• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Value Drawings
 

Value Drawings

on

  • 1,013 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,013
Views on SlideShare
694
Embed Views
319

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
37
Comments
0

5 Embeds 319

http://coleccionvelazquez.wordpress.com 219
http://duckworthstudioart.blogspot.com 90
http://www.google.es 7
http://duckworthstudioart.blogspot.kr 2
http://duckworthstudioart.blogspot.ca 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • {"2":"Value is a range from highlight (the brightest highlight being white) to shadow (the darkest being black) and all of the tones in between. The 3 tones to know are white (highlight) middle grey, and black (shadow).\n"}

Value Drawings Value Drawings Presentation Transcript

  • Highlight: Lightest light = white Shadow: Darkest dark = black Mid-tones: All the grays in between
  • The aim of realist value drawing is to accurately illustrate the form or 3D quality of objects using highlights, midtones and shadows
  • We can use value to make a 2D drawing look 3D. For example, we can make this circle look like a sphere by using a range of value to give the illusion of form.
  • Outlines only define visible edges and don't tell us anything about light and dark. Linear drawing and value drawing are two different systems of representation.
  • Cube made using only value ⏎ ⏎ Cube made using both outline and value Eliminating outlines and using value only accurately describes an object’s appearance
  • A good way to begin using value in a drawing is to assign each shape in the drawing a different value. Notice the different shapes of value in this ink wash drawing.
  • Notice that the pumpkin is defined only by light and dark, not by outline. By filling in the background with value, the light edge of the pumpkin is visible. Most successful value drawings use light and dark throughout the entire composition.
  • Value drawing is like painting in graphite or charcoal. The process is different than using a brush – you need to think in terms of AREAS as opposed to lines. Shade the darks, observing the shape and value while being careful to shade up to the edge of adjoining light areas. The realism seen in some images takes a very high degree of detail, where the tonal values are closely observed and finely drawn.
  • When creating a value drawing, you need to shift out of linedrawing mode. The best way to do this is to forbid yourself to draw a line, and focus on areas of value. You may use the lightest of lines to get down the basic shapes. From there, build up the shading. Often the outline will be at the join between two different values, and is created by the contrast between the light and dark area.
  • Contrast! Remember the lines between values? Well, those hard lines form contrast. High contrast is when subjects are illuminated by a bright light source and cast dark shadows. Light and dark values will be next to each other. In the value chart, you would be skipping a value or two (or more!).
  • Low contrast uses values that are next to each other on the value chart. With low contrast, values close together will define the bulk of the subject. You could selectively highlight or accentuate portions with lights or darks.
  • A bit about your drawing pencils… Graded on the European system using a continuum from "H" (for hardness) to "B" (for blackness), as well as "F", a letter arbitrarily chosen to indicate midway between HB and H. The standard writing pencil is graded HB.
  • Name: ____________________________ Studio Art Value HW
  • Practice Value Drawings
  • Practice Value Drawings In your sketchbook, you will draw each of the forms for 5-10 minutes. Remember to LOOK at what you are drawing – don’t draw what you think, draw what you SEE!!! Your sketchbook will be checked at the end of class.
  • Different Ways to Create Value Now you’ll practice these on some Art Cards.
  • Stippling Stippling is actually lots of little dots. Practice making dots of different sizes with your pen or marker. Make some dots pressing lightly. Try some pressing firmly. Press quickly and then hold the tip on the paper for a second or two to see what happens, Experiment and see how many different dots your marker or pen can make. Practice making many dots close together to make dark areas. Then make dots lighter and less dense as you move towards light.
  • Stippling Transform shapes to forms… Now draw a circle with your pencil. Circles look flat. Make it look like a 3D sphere by stippling with your marker from darkest to lightest. You might want to find a ball and shine a light on it to see how the light falls on a sphere. Try squinting your eyes – it helps to see the 3D form emerge as you stipple. Try making other forms too!
  • Hatching Hatching is actually lots of little lines. Practice making lines of different weights and lengths with your markers. Make some lines drawing lightly. Try drawing firmly. Draw some quickly and then hold the tip on the paper and draw slowly. Experiment and see how many different hatching lines your marker can make. Practice making darker lines close together to make the dark areas. Now make fewer, lighter lines as you move towards the light.
  • Hatching Transform shapes to forms… Now draw a cylinder with your pencil. Make it look really 3D by drawing hatching lines from darkest to lightest. It helps to have the hatching lines bend around the form or stay straight in the flat areas. You may want to find a can or other cylinder and shine a light on it to see how the light falls. Try making other forms too!
  • Crosshatching Crosshatching is lots of little lines that cross. It is very similar to hatching – except the lines crisscross. Practice making crosshatching lines of different sizes with your markers. Makes some lines drawing lightly. Try drawing firmly. Draw some quickly and then draw slowly. Experiment and see how many different crosshatching lines your marker can make. Practice making many crosshatching lines close together to make dark areas. Then make lighter, less dense crosshatching lines as you move towards the light.
  • Crosshatching Transform shapes to forms… Draw a cube with your pencil. Make it looks more 3D by crosshatching from the darkest area to the lightest. It helps to have the crosshatching lines bend around the form or stay straight in flat areas. You may want to find a cube form and shine a light on it to see how the light and shadows look. Try making other forms too!
  • P rinciples of P asta
  • P rinciples of P asta This project will test your knowledge and application of the elements or art and principles of design. Specifically, you will be working with the art element of value and a principle of your choice to create a value drawing of a pasta sculpture that you will be creating.
  • W hat You W Do ill On a 3” x4” card you will create an interesting composition/sculpture using only the provided pasta… Clearly demonstrate at least ONE Principle of Design Consider multiple solutions and choose best one Consider how you overlap shapes, the negative space created, and shadows Do not be afraid to switch your ideas or change pasta shapes the more you plan and experiment the better outcome you will have! • • • •
  • W hat You W Do ill Once you have a final arrangement and composition with the pasta, you will glue the pieces onto the card to create a permanent sculpture. NOT : you should take a photo of your final composition plan before you E disassemble in order to glue it down and not forget your design. The sculpture will then spray painted white. A viewfinder will be used focus on a final that you will 9” x12” paper value. be to composition then draw on using a full range a
  • PASTA Value Drawings
  • Questions?