Ceramics I Curriculum
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Ceramics I Curriculum

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Curriculum for Ceramics I at Victor Senior High School.

Curriculum for Ceramics I at Victor Senior High School.

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Ceramics I Curriculum Ceramics I Curriculum Document Transcript

  • Ceramics  I  Curriculum   Victor  Central  Schools         Acknowledgements    Shawn  Duckworth       Senior  High  Art  Teacher  Marysue  Hartz-­‐Holtz       Senior  High  Art  Teacher                                                                          
  • New  York  State  Learning  Standards  for  the  Visual  Arts   (Note:  performance  indicators  for  9-­‐12  grade  level  only,  see  “NYS  Standards  Art.doc”  in   Staff  Shared  à  Art  Department  Folder)    Standard  1:  Creating,  Performing  and  Participating  in  the  Arts  Students  will  actively  engage  in  the  processes  that  constitute  creation  and  performance  in  the  arts  (dance,  music,  theatre,  and  visual  arts)  and  participate  in  various  roles  in  the  arts.    Commencement  Performance  Indicators:   • create  a  collection  of  art  work,  in  a  variety  of  mediums,  based  on  instructional   assignments  and  individual  and  collective  experiences  to  explore  perceptions,  ideas,   and  viewpoints     • create  art  works  in  which  they  use  and  evaluate  different  kinds  of  mediums,   subjects,  themes,  symbols,  metaphors,  and  images     • demonstrate  an  increasing  level  of  competence  in  using  the  elements  and  principles   of  art  to  create  art  works  for  public  exhibition   • reflect  on  their  developing  work  to  determine  the  effectiveness  of  selected  mediums   and  techniques  for  conveying  meaning  and  adjust  their  decisions  accordingly      Standard  2:  Knowing  and  Using  Arts  Materials  and  Resources  Students  will  be  knowledgeable  about  and  make  use  of  the  materials  and  resources  available  for  participation  in  the  arts  in  various  roles.    Commencement  Performance  Indicators:   • select  and  use  mediums  and  processes  that  communicate  intended  meaning  in  their   art  works,  and  exhibit  competence  in  at  least  two  mediums   • use  the  computer  and  electronic  media  to  express  their  visual  ideas  and   demonstrate  a  variety  of  approaches  to  artistic  creation     • interact  with  professional  artists  and  participate  in  school-­‐  and  community-­‐ sponsored  programs  by  art  organizations  and  cultural  institutions     • understand  a  broad  range  of  vocations/avocations  in  the  field  of  visual  arts,   including  those  involved  with  creating,  performing,  exhibiting,  and  promoting  art        Standard  3:  Responding  to  and  Analyzing  Works  of  Art  Students  will  respond  critically  to  a  variety  of  works  in  the  arts,  connecting  the  individual  work  to  other  works  and  to  other  aspects  of  human  endeavor  and  thought.    Commencement  Performance  Indicators:   • use  the  language  of  art  criticism  by  reading  and  discussing  critical  reviews  in   newspapers  and  journals  and  by  writing  their  own  critical  responses  to  works  of  art   (either  their  own  or  those  of  others)     • explain  the  visual  and  other  sensory  qualities  in  art  and  nature  and  their  relation  to   the  social  environment  
  • • analyze  and  interpret  the  ways  in  which  political,  cultural,  social,  religious,  and   psychological  concepts  and  themes  have  been  explored  in  visual  art     • develop  connections  between  the  ways  ideas,  themes,  and  concepts  are  expressed   through  the  visual  arts  and  other  disciplines  in  everyday  life        Standard  4:  Understanding  the  Cultural  Dimensions  and  Contributions  of  the  Arts  Students  will  develop  an  understanding  of  the  personal  and  cultural  forces  that  shape  artistic  communication  and  how  the  arts  in  turn  shape  the  diverse  cultures  of  past  and  present  society.    Commencement  Performance  Indicators:   • analyze  works  of  art  from  diverse  world  cultures  and  discuss  the  ideas,  issues,  and   events  of  the  culture  that  these  works  convey     • examine  works  of  art  and  artifacts  from  United  States  cultures  and  place  them   within  a  cultural  and  historical  context     • create  art  works  that  reflect  a  variety  of  cultural  influences                                                        
  • Victor  Central  School  District   K-­‐12   Commencement  Outcomes   World-­‐Ready  Graduates    Effective  Communicators  Students  will:   • Read,  write,  listen  and  speak  purposefully  and  critically  in  a  variety  of  situations.   • Communicate  in  multiple  ways,  including  through  the  arts.   • Understand  and  perform  in  a  variety  of  group  settings  and  diverse  populations.   • Work  collaboratively  as  an  effective  member  of  a  team.    Quality  Producers  Students  will:   • Produce  relevant,  innovative,  high  quality  products  that  reflect  originality  and   excellence.   • Prioritize,  plan,  and  manage  for  optimum  results.    Complex  Thinkers  Students  will:   • Identify  problems  and  use  effective  strategies  to  reach  solutions.   • Use  critical  and  creative  thinking  strategies  and  skills  in  a  variety  of  situations.   • Take  risks  when  tackling  challenging  problems.    Life-­‐Long  Learners  Students  will:   • Develop  and  apply  effective  study  skills.   • Use  state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art  technology  communications  networks  to  access,  manage,   integrate,  evaluate,  and  create  information  in  order  to  function  in  a  global  society.   • Modify  and/or  influence  thinking,  attitudes  and/or  behaviors  to  function  in  a  multi-­‐ cultural  society.   • Be  driven  by  curiosity  and  a  desire  to  know.                          
  • Essential  Understandings  and  Benchmarks  for  Art  9-­‐12:   Regardless  of  the  course,  these  are  all  encompassing  at  the  9  –  12  Levels        Essential  Understandings:   • Art  is  a  vehicle  for  communicating  an  idea.   • Assessment  in  the  visual  arts  needs  to  be  an  objective  process  despite  its  subjective   nature.   • The  end  product  is  created  with  craftsmanship  in  mind  in  order  to  create  a   professional  product,  whether  aesthetic  or  utilitarian.   • Artwork  is  created  today  as  a  result  of  the  work  that  was  created  in  the  past.      Benchmark  1:  The  Elements  of  Art  Line,  Shape,  Color,  Value,  Texture,  Space,  &  Form  The  Students  Will:   • Recognize  the  elements  within  a  work  of  art   • Apply  the  elements  as  a  tool  for  creating  a  work  of  art  with  the  intention  of   strengthening  their  work   • Describe  the  use  of  each  specific  element  within  the  context  of  a  work  of  art    Benchmark  2:  The  Principles  of  Design  Balance,  emphasis,  variety,  movement,  proportion,  contrast,  unity,  rhythm,  pattern,  repetition,  &  harmony  The  Students  Will:   • Recognize  the  principles  of  design  within  a  work  of  art   • Apply  the  principles  of  design  as  a  tool  for  creating  a  work  of  art  with  the  intention   of  strengthening  their  work   • Understand  the  concept  of  a  principle  and  how  it  differs  from  an  element    Benchmark  3:  Color  Competency  12  Step  Color  Wheel,  Additive  (RGB)  Color  Wheel,  Subtractive  (CMYK)  Color  Wheel,  Tints,  Shades,  Tones,  &  Color  Schemes:  Monochromatic,  Analogous,  Complimentary,  Triadic,  Warm,  and  Cool  The  Student  Will:   • Be  able  to  identify  the  12  step,  additive,  and  subtractive  color  wheels  within  their   appropriate  contexts   • Manipulate  color  through  the  use  of  various  artistic  media     • Expand  their  knowledge  of  color  beyond  the  color  wheel  through  understanding   tints,  shades,  and  tones   • Learn  a  variety  of  techniques  for  mixing,  blending,  and  layering  colors   • Know  the  components  of  color:  hue,  value,  and  intensity   • Understand  that  color  can  impact  the  mood  and  meaning  of  a  work  of  art   • Know  and  be  able  to  apply  six  common  color  schemes:  Monochromatic,  Analogous,   Complimentary,  Triadic,  Warm,  and  Cool  
  •  Benchmark  4:  The  Creative  Process  Brainstorming,  Concept  Mapping,  Thumbnail  Sketching,  In-­‐Process  Critiques,  Diversity  in  Potential  Outcomes,  Critical  Thinking  &  Creative  Problem  Solving  The  Student  Will:   • Learn  strategies  for  critical  thinking  and  creative  problem  solving   • Understand  that  creating  a  work  of  art  is  a  process  that  requires  the  development  of   an  idea  and  the  revisions  of  that  idea  that  lead  to  the  creation  of  a  visual  piece     • Learn  how  to  generate  ideas  through  techniques  such  as  brainstorming,  concept   mapping,  and  thumbnail  sketching   • Understand  that  a  work  of  art  is  a  problem  that  can  result  in  an  endless  amount  of   possible  outcomes    Benchmark  5:  Critiquing  Compare  and  contrast,  reflection,  and  constructive  criticism    The  Student  Will:   • Analyze  artwork  using  the  language  of  visual  art  including  vocabulary  terms,  the   elements  of  art,  and  principles  of  design   • Have  the  confidence  to  make  informed,  objective  statements  about  their  own  work   and  the  work  of  their  peers   • Reflect  on  the  processes  and  products  created  as  a  form  of  self  assessment    Benchmark  6:  Quality,  Craftsmanship,  and  Care  for  Materials  Preparation,  Art  Process,  Presentation,  Organization,  Cleanup    The  Student  Will:   • Demonstrate  respect  for  classroom  materials  in  order  to  maintain  the   organizational  structure  of  the  physical  environment   • Understand  that  creating  a  quality  product  requires  time,  effort,  and  patience   throughout  the  creative  process   • Recognize  that  developing  an  investment  in  their  work  while  avoiding  careless   mistakes  is  integral  to  the  creation  of  a  quality  product    Benchmark  7:  Art  Criticism  and  Aesthetics  Feldman’s  Model  for  Art  Criticism,  Formalism,  Expressionism,  Imitationalism,  &  Functionalism  The  Student  Will:   • Learn  how  to  formally  analyze  a  work  of  art   • Describe  specific  qualities  of  a  work  of  art  based  on  Feldman’s  Model  of  Art   Criticism   • Recognize  the  key  aesthetic  characteristics  of  Formalism,  Expressionism,   Imitationalism,  &  Functionalism    Benchmark  8:  Media  Literacy  Computer  Usage  Goals,  and  Introductory  Media  Experience  Expectations  The  Students  Will:  
  • • Develop  a  basic  skill  set  using  the  following  digital  media  formats:  computers,  digital   cameras,  scanners,  and  a  drawing  tablets  in  conjunction  with  an  industry-­‐standard   software  format   • Be  exposed  to  a  variety  of  visual  arts  media      Benchmark  9:  Art  History  Breadth  in  Art  History  Timeline,  Depth  in  Modern  Art  (Since  Impressionism)  The  Students  Will:   • Understand  the  visual  arts  in  relation  to  history  and  cultures   • Analyze  common  characteristics  of  works  of  art  and  artifacts  across  time  periods   and  among  cultural  groups  to  identify  influences   • Identify  the  characteristics  of  the  major  art  movements  since  the  invention  of   photography   • Create  works  of  art  that  incorporate  art  history  into  their  own  creative  processes   • Appreciate  the  rich  history  of  art,  its  evolution  throughout  time,  and  how  it   continues  to  impact  the  art  they  create  today   • Recognize  specific  Modern  Art  Movements                                              
  • Philosophy  of  Art  Education   Victor  Central  School  District      Art  is  a  language  that  allows  the  student  to  express  individuality  and  communicate  ideas  about  self  and  the  world  through  the  use  of  visual  symbols  and  images.  The  need  to  create  has  been  an  essential  part  of  human  nature  since  the  beginning  of  times.  It  enriches  the  human  experience  on  many  levels  (functional,  decorative  and  spiritual),  and  can  serve  as  a  format  for  historical  documentation  and  social  commentary.      Art  is  a  natural  vehicle  for  nurturing  problem  solving,  decision-­‐making  and  self-­‐evaluation  opportunities  along  with  other  higher  order  thinking  skills.  Art  education  seeks  to  develop  creative,  sensitive  and  artistically  literate  individuals  who  may  grow  emotionally,  aesthetically  and  intellectually  through  active  expression  or  reflective  appreciation  of  the  arts.    The  study  of  art  from  other  cultures  heightens  the  student’s  aesthetic  awareness,  sensitivity  and  respect  for  other  views,  values,  and  traditions  as  well  as  their  own.  Study  of  the  visual  arts  provides  students  with  the  opportunity  to  develop  a  critical  and  intensely  personal  view  of  them  in  relation  to  the  world.  As  an  integral  part  of  the  life-­‐long  learning  process  that  extends  beyond  the  classroom,  art  connects  with  the  other  disciplines  to  create  a  collective  experience.    Experiences  in  art  help  to  educate  the  while  child  while  nurturing  the  individual  strengths  of  each  student.  Learning  cooperatively  in  a  common  environment  encourages  growth  of  self-­‐esteem  and  self-­‐confidence.  Development  of  sensitivity  to  the  needs  and  feelings  of  others  balances  with  responsibility  for  one’  s  own  personal  well  being  in  the  art  room.  Students  learn  tolerance  for  one  another  and  an  ability  to  consider  taking  new  points  of  view.  New  challenges  in  the  art  room  support  the  skill  of  risk-­‐taking,  which  leads  to  a  lifetime  of  successful  personal  and  professional  growth.                                    
  • Ceramics  I  Units     1st  Marking  Period:  Weeks  1-­‐10   Unit  #  1  –  Introduction  to  Ceramics  (2  weeks)   Unit  #  2  –  Handbuilding  –  Pinch  Construction  (4  weeks)   Unit  #  3  –  Handbuilding  –  Coil  Construction  (4  weeks)     2nd  Marking  Period:  Weeks  11-­‐20   Unit  #  4  –  Handbuilding  –  Slab  Construction  (4  weeks)   Unit  #  5  –  Final  Project  and  Assessment  (6  weeks)         Ceramics  I  Timeline   (1/2  Year  course  meeting  2-­‐class  blocks  every  4  days)     1st  Marking  Period       Introduction  to         Ceramics   Handbuilding  –  Pinch  Construction   Handbuilding  –  Coil  Construction                       2nd  Marking  Period         Handbuilding  –  Slab  Consruction   Final  Project  and  Assessment                                        
  • Ceramics  I  –  Unit  #1   Introduction  to  Ceramics  (2  weeks)    NYS  Learning  Standards  for  the  Arts:  2  and  3    VCS  Commencement  Standards:  Effective  Communicators  and  Complex  Thinkers    Essential  Understandings:     1. Preparation,  maintenance,  and  care  of  materials  and  tools  for  proper  use  is  an   important  aspect  of  ceramic  arts.   2. Ceramics  has  evolved  through  time.     3. Current  ceramic  artwork  and  careers  are  a  result  of  what  was  created  and   developed  in  the  past.     4. Organization,  planning  and  documenting  is  critical  to  the  process  of  creating   artwork.    Terminal  Objectives:  The  Students  Will:   1. Be  able  to  demonstrate  and  use  their  understanding  of  clay  care  and  maintenance   by  properly  handling  clay,  cleaning  tools  and  workspace,  and  storing  raw  clay.   2. Be  introduced  to  the  history  of  ceramics.   3. Understand  the  significance  of  ceramics  as  an  art  form  and  career  in  the  arts.   4. Create  a  working  organizer  to  brainstorm,  plan  and  document  processes  for  the   course.    Task  Analysis:  The  Students  Will:   • Examine  a  slideshow  presentation  of  an  overview  of  ceramic  examples  including   timelines  and  artist  bio/information.   • Review  and  complete  a  vocabulary  handout  that  includes:  ceramics,  pottery,   armature,  slake,  recondition,  and  tools  (fettling  knife,  needle  tool,  rib,  paddle,  clay   cutter,  sponge,  loop,  bat).   • Explore  and  examine  the  properties  of  clay,  working  with  clay,  ceramic  tools,  and   their  proper  use.     • Gain  an  understanding  of  the  proper  storage  of  raw  clay.   • Learn  about  ceramics  safety  in  addition  to  essential  cleaning  procedures  of  the   ceramics  studio,  materials  and  tools.       • Develop  an  awareness  for  common  assessment,  craftsmanship,  and  work  ethic   expectations  both  inside  and  outside  of  the  classroom.   • Create  a  graphic  organizer  and  course  binder  for  working  with  a  sketchbook  to   brainstorm,  plan,  and  document  processes.      Relevant  Activities:   1. Develop  a  course  introduction  presentation  and  handout  outlining  ceramics   examples,  properties,  and  types  of  clay.  
  • 2. Complete  a  vocabulary  sheet  based  on  introductory  ceramics  terms.   3. Recondition  clay  into  a  workable  state  and  then  store  for  future  use.   4. Demonstrate  and  practice  proper  handling  and  cleanup  procedures  of  clay,  tools,   workspace  and  selves.     5. Develop  presentation  and  handouts  based  on  critical  vocabulary,  tools,   maintenance,  and  safety  for  the  ceramics  studio.     6. Create  graphic  organizer/binder  for  brainstorming,  idea  development,  planning,   and  process  documentation.        Relevant  Resources:   • Book:  Handbuilt  Pottery  Techniques  Revealed  by  Jacqui  Atkin,  2004   • Book:  Experience  Clay  by  Maureen  Mackey,  2003                                                                  
  • Ceramics  I  –  Unit  #2   Handbuilding  –  Pinch  Construction  (4  weeks)    NYS  Learning  Standards  for  the  Arts:  1,  2  and  3    VCS  Commencement  Standards:  Effective  Communicators,  Quality  Producers,  Complex  Thinkers  and  Life-­‐Long  Learners    Essential  Understandings:     1. Various  forms  of  construction  methods  in  Ceramics  –  focus  on  pinch  construction  as   a  method  that  can  be  applied  to  clay  product  creation.     2. Historic  through  contemporary  applications  of  pinch  technique.   3. Preparation,  maintenance,  and  care  of  materials  and  tools  for  proper  in-­‐process  use   as  well  as  care  and  treatments  at  the  completion  of  each  day  and  project.    Terminal  Objectives:  The  Students  Will:   1. Be  able  to  demonstrate  their  understanding  of  pinch  technique  by  creating  several   pinch-­‐constructed  forms.     2. Be  able  to  identify,  understand  and  then  relate  techniques  seen  in  examples  into   their  own  final  pinch  forms.     3. Be  able  to  demonstrate  and  use  their  understanding  of  clay  care  and  maintenance   by  properly  handling,  cleaning  and  storing  raw  clay,  tools,  in-­‐process  creations,  and   final  products.    Task  Analysis:  The  Students  Will:   • Examine  a  presentation  of  ceramic  pinch  construction  examples.   • Review  and  complete  a  vocabulary  handout  that  includes:  wedging,  pinch   construction,  slip  and  score,  texture,  greenware,  leatherhard,  bisqueware,  plasticity,   kiln,  firing,  and  sculptural  –  additive  and  subtractive.     • Explore  the  process  and  techniques  of  ceramic  pinch  construction  by  creating   several  forms  implementing  these  techniques,  i.e  slip/score  and  adding  holes  for  air   escape  during  firing.     • Gain  an  understanding  of  the  proper  storage  of  in-­‐progress  projects.   • Implement  the  steps  for  designing  and  planning  a  pinch-­‐constructed  form  through   brainstorming,  conceptual  research,  and  sketching.     • Demonstrate  their  understanding  and  ability  to  collect  visual  information  and   references  from  their  surroundings,  and  then  successfully  apply  use  of  imagery  into   their  final  artwork.     • Combine  design  and  exploration  experiences  and  exposures  to  create  a  final  pinch   constructed  form.     • Gain  further  understanding  of  the  firing  process  through  review  and  demonstration.     • Explore  finishing  options  on  bisqueware,  such  as,  acrylics,  watercolor  washes,  etc.    
  • • Understand  that  a  well-­‐planned  design  concept  is  essential  to  creating  a  successful   ceramics  end  product.     • Reflect  on  the  development  of  the  creative  process.   • Develop  an  awareness  for  common  assessment,  craftsmanship,  and  work  ethic   expectations  both  inside  and  outside  of  the  classroom.   • Determine  positive  habits  of  creating  and  working  with  a  sketchbook  for   brainstorming,  planning,  and  process  documentation.   • Assess  and  reflect  upon  their  work  and  the  work  of  their  peers  through  class   critiques  and  aesthetic  discussions  based  on  the  formal  qualities  of  their  artwork.    Relevant  Activities:   1. Develop  a  presentation  and  assignment  handout  outlining  conceptual  project  theme,   requirements  and  expectations.   2. Practice  using  low  fire  Cone  06  clay  to  create  several  pinch  pots,  slip  and  score  2   pinch  pots  together  to  create  hollow  globe,  reshape  globe  into  several  alternate   forms,  and  poke  holes  into  clay  to  prevent  explosion.     3. Check  for  understanding  of  expectations  and  techniques  through  class  discussions   and  sharing.   4. Create  visual  organizer  for  brainstorming,  idea  development  and  planning  specific   to  a  pinch  constructed  project.   5. Develop  a  culminating  project  based  on  pinch  construction:   a. Hybrid  sculpture  of  produce  and  animal   b. Functional  bowl  set   c. Rattle,  whistle,  or  other  musical  instrument   d. Elongated  vases   e. Zoomorphic  tripod  vessel   6. Review  and  demonstrate  steps  and  vocabulary  for  proper  kiln  firing.     7. Demonstration  of  finishing  technique  specific  to  this  project.     8. Culminate  in  class  critique,  where  teacher  and  students  reflect  on  strong  points,   dynamic  qualities,  and  offer  constructive  criticism  including  suggestions  for   improvements.      Relevant  Resources:   • Book:  Handbuilt  Pottery  Techniques  Revealed  by  Jacqui  Atkin,  2004   • Book:  Experience  Clay  by  Maureen  Mackey,  2003                      
  • Ceramics  I  –  Unit  #3   Handbuilding  –  Coil  Construction  (4  weeks)    NYS  Learning  Standards  for  the  Arts:  1,  2,  3  and  4    VCS  Commencement  Standards:  Effective  Communicators,  Quality  Producers,  Complex  Thinkers  and  Life-­‐Long  Learners    Essential  Understandings:     1. Various  forms  of  construction  methods  in  Ceramics  –  focus  on  coil  construction  as  a   method  that  can  be  applied  to  clay  product  creation.     2. Historic  through  contemporary  applications  of  coil  technique.   3. Understanding  that  utilitarian  ceramic  forms  created  throughout  history  have  an   impact  on  the  work  that  is  created  today.   4. Preparation,  maintenance,  and  care  of  materials  and  tools  for  proper  in-­‐process  use   as  well  as  care  and  treatments  at  the  completion  of  each  day  and  project.    Terminal  Objectives:  The  Students  Will:   1. Be  able  to  demonstrate  their  understanding  of  coil  technique  by  creating  multiple   coil-­‐constructed  forms.     2. Be  able  to  identify,  understand  and  then  relate  techniques  seen  in  examples  into   their  own  final  coil  forms.     3. Examine  utilitarian  ceramic  work  from  a  variety  of  different  cultures  and  apply   concepts  to  their  own  work.   4. Be  able  to  demonstrate  and  use  their  understanding  of  clay  care  and  maintenance   by  properly  handling,  cleaning  and  storing  raw  clay,  tools,  in-­‐process  creations,  and   final  products.    Task  Analysis:  The  Students  Will:   • Examine  a  presentation  of  ceramic  coil  construction  examples  in  historical  and   cultural  contexts.   • Review  and  complete  a  vocabulary  handout  that  includes:  coil,  glaze,  sgraffito,  slip   trailing,  incising,  functional/utilitarian,  aesthetic   • Explore  the  process  and  techniques  of  ceramic  coil  construction  by  creating  a  coil   mug  with  handle.     • Explore  the  finishing  process  and  techniques  of  sgrafitto  and  slip  trailing  on   leatherhard  mug.     • Gain  an  understanding  of  the  proper  storage  of  in-­‐progress  and  final  projects.   • Implement  the  steps  for  designing  and  planning  a  coil-­‐constructed  form  with  a   cultural  influence  through  brainstorming,  conceptual  research,  and  sketching.     • Demonstrate  their  understanding  and  ability  to  research  cultural  utilitarian  pottery   and  its  impact  on  form,  function  and  design.  
  • • Collect  visual  information  and  references  from  their  cultural  influence,  and  then   successfully  apply  use  of  research  and  imagery  into  their  final  artwork.     • Combine  design  and  exploration  experiences  and  exposures  to  create  a  final  coil   constructed  form  implementing  the  sgraffito  technique.     • Explore  the  possibility  of  creating  a  template  to  assist  with  form  consistency  and   symmetry.   • Gain  further  understanding  of  the  firing  process  through  review  and  demonstration,   where  students  help  load  and  unload  kiln.   • Explore  glaze  finishing  options  on  bisqueware.     • Understand  that  a  well-­‐planned  design  concept  is  essential  to  creating  a  successful   ceramics  end  product.     • Reflect  on  the  development  of  the  creative  process.   • Develop  an  awareness  for  common  assessment,  craftsmanship,  and  work  ethic   expectations  both  inside  and  outside  of  the  classroom.   • Determine  positive  habits  of  creating  and  working  with  a  sketchbook  for   brainstorming,  planning,  and  process  documentation.   • Assess  and  reflect  upon  their  work  and  the  work  of  their  peers  through  class   critiques  and  aesthetic  discussions  based  on  the  formal  qualities  of  their  artwork.    Relevant  Activities:   1. Develop  a  presentation  and  assignment  handout  outlining  a  culturally  influenced   project  theme,  requirements  and  expectations.   2. Practice  using  red  low  fire  Cone  06  clay  to  create  a  small  practice  coil  vessel  with   handle.   3. Demonstrate  and  experiment  with  white  clay  sgraffito  and  slip  trail  design   techniques  on  leatherhard  red  clay  practice  vessel.   4. Check  for  understanding  of  expectations  and  techniques  through  class  discussions   and  sharing.   5. Create  visual  organizer  and  references  for  cultural  research,  brainstorming,  idea   development  and  planning  specific  to  a  coil  constructed  project.   6. Develop  a  culminating  project  based  on  coil  construction  with  a  cultural  connection:   a. Greek  Story  Pot  Vessel   b. Japanese  Lanterns  or  Luminaries   c. Native  American  Mimbres   d. Aboriginal  Vases  or  Bowls   7. Review  and  practice  steps  and  vocabulary  for  proper  kiln  bisque  firing.     8. Demonstration  of  finishing  technique  specific  to  this  project,  i.e  sgraffito  and  glaze   application.   9. Review  and  demonstrate  steps  and  vocabulary  for  proper  glaze  firing.     10. Culminate  in  class  critique,  where  teacher  and  students  reflect  on  strong  points,   dynamic  qualities,  and  offer  constructive  criticism  including  suggestions  for   improvements.      Relevant  Resources:   • Book:  Handbuilt  Pottery  Techniques  Revealed  by  Jacqui  Atkin,  2004  
  • • Book:  Experience  Clay  by  Maureen  Mackey,  2003   • Greek  Pottery:   o http://www.ancientgreece.co.uk/dailylife/explore/exp_set.html   o http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/greekartarchaeology/tp/GreekPottery.htm   o http://mkatz.web.wesleyan.edu/vases/vase_shapes.html                                                                                    
  • Ceramics  I  –  Unit  #4   Handbuilding  –  Slab  Construction  (4  weeks)    NYS  Learning  Standards  for  the  Arts:  1,  2,  and  3    VCS  Commencement  Standards:  Effective  Communicators,  Quality  Producers,  Complex  Thinkers  and  Life-­‐Long  Learners    Essential  Understandings:     1. Various  forms  of  construction  methods  in  Ceramics  –  focus  on  slab  construction  as  a   method  that  can  be  applied  to  clay  product  creation.     2. Historic  through  contemporary  applications  of  slab  technique.   3. Preparation,  maintenance,  and  care  of  materials  and  tools  for  proper  in-­‐process  use   as  well  as  care  and  treatments  at  the  completion  of  each  day  and  project.    Terminal  Objectives:  The  Students  Will:   1. Be  able  to  demonstrate  their  understanding  of  slab  technique  by  creating  multiple   slab-­‐constructed  forms.     2. Be  able  to  identify,  understand  and  then  relate  techniques  seen  in  examples  into   their  own  final  slab  forms.     3. Be  able  to  demonstrate  and  use  their  understanding  of  clay  care  and  maintenance   by  properly  handling,  cleaning  and  storing  raw  clay,  tools,  in-­‐process  creations,  and   final  products.    Task  Analysis:  The  Students  Will:   • Examine  a  presentation  of  ceramic  slab  construction  examples.   • Review  and  complete  a  vocabulary  handout  that  includes:  slab,  glaze,  and   underglaze.   • Demonstrate  and  practice  rolling  slab  tiles  and  adding  a  variety  of  textures  to  be   used  for  glaze  reference  and  experimentation.   • Explore  the  process  and  techniques  of  ceramic  slab  construction  by  creating  a   practice  cube,  cutting  a  lid,  adding  handles,  feet  or  other  embellishments.     • Explore  glaze  and  underglaze  finishing  process  and  techniques  on  bisque  fired  slab   tile  made  previously.     • Gain  an  understanding  of  the  proper  storage  of  in-­‐progress  and  final  projects.   • Implement  the  steps  for  designing  and  planning  a  slab-­‐constructed  form  through   brainstorming,  conceptual  research,  and  sketching.     • Demonstrate  their  understanding  and  ability  to  collect  visual  information  and   references,  and  then  successfully  apply  use  of  research  and  imagery  into  their  final   artwork.     • Combine  design  and  exploration  experiences  and  exposures  to  create  a  final  slab   constructed  form.    
  • • Explore  the  possibility  of  creating  a  3D  template  to  disassemble  and  use  as  a  project   pattern.   • Gain  further  understanding  of  the  firing  process  through  review  and  demonstration,   where  students  help  load  and  unload  kiln.   • Explore  glaze  and  underglaze  finishing  options  on  bisqueware  based  on  previous   experimentation.   • Understand  that  a  well-­‐planned  design  concept  is  essential  to  creating  a  successful   ceramics  end  product.     • Reflect  on  the  development  of  the  creative  process.   • Develop  an  awareness  for  common  assessment,  craftsmanship,  and  work  ethic   expectations  both  inside  and  outside  of  the  classroom.   • Determine  positive  habits  of  creating  and  working  with  a  sketchbook  for   brainstorming,  planning,  and  process  documentation.   • Assess  and  reflect  upon  their  work  and  the  work  of  their  peers  through  class   critiques  and  aesthetic  discussions  based  on  the  formal  qualities  of  their  artwork.    Relevant  Activities:   1. Develop  a  presentation  and  assignment  handout  outlining  a  conceptually  based   project  theme,  requirements  and  expectations.   2. Practice  using  low  fire  Cone  06  clay  to  create  a  small  practice  slab  hollow  cube.   3. Demonstrate  and  practice  cutting  a  lid  and  adding  a  handle  or  other  embellishments   when  cube  is  leatherhard.   4. Check  for  understanding  of  expectations  and  techniques  through  class  discussions   and  sharing.   5. Create  visual  organizer  and  references  for  brainstorming,  idea  development  and   planning  specific  to  a  slab  constructed  container.   6. Develop  a  culminating  slab  constructed  container  project  with  a  conceptual  and/or   personal  design  focus:   a. Joseph  Cornell  Box   b. Dream  House  or  Bird  House   c. “Contain  Your  Fears”   d. Personal  Definition  or  Symbolic  Box   7. Review  and  practice  vocabulary  and  steps  for  proper  kiln  bisque  firing.     8. Application  of  glaze  and  underglaze  finishing  techniques  and  applications.   9. Review  and  demonstrate  vocabulary  and  steps  proper  glaze  firing.     10. Culminate  in  class  critique,  where  teacher  and  students  reflect  on  strong  points,   dynamic  qualities,  and  offer  constructive  criticism  including  suggestions  for   improvements.      Relevant  Resources:   • Book:  Handbuilt  Pottery  Techniques  Revealed  by  Jacqui  Atkin,  2004   • Book:  Experience  Clay  by  Maureen  Mackey,  2003          
  • Ceramics  I  –  Unit  #5   Final  Project  and  Assessment  (6  weeks)    NYS  Learning  Standards  for  the  Arts:  1,  2,  3  and  4    VCS  Commencement  Standards:  Effective  Communicators,  Quality  Producers,  Complex  Thinkers  and  Life-­‐Long  Learners    Essential  Understandings:     1. Various  forms  of  construction  methods  in  Ceramics  –  focus  on  multiple  methods   within  final  work  of  ceramic  art.     2. Historic  through  contemporary  applications  of  ceramic  handbuilding  techniques.   3. Preparation,  maintenance,  and  care  of  materials  and  tools  for  proper  in-­‐process  use   as  well  as  care  and  treatments  at  the  completion  of  each  day  and  project.    Terminal  Objectives:  The  Students  Will:   1. Be  able  to  demonstrate  their  understanding  of  all  handbuilding  and  finishing   processes  by  creating  a  final  product  using  multiple  techniques.     2. Be  able  to  identify,  understand  and  then  relate  techniques  seen  in  examples  into   their  own  final  handbuilt  forms.     3. Be  able  to  demonstrate  and  use  their  understanding  of  clay  care  and  maintenance   by  properly  handling,  cleaning  and  storing  raw  clay,  tools,  in-­‐process  creations,  and   final  products.    Task  Analysis:  The  Students  Will:   • Examine  a  presentation  of  ceramic  construction  examples  that  incorporates   multiple  handbuilding  techniques.   • Review  and  complete  course  vocabulary  handout.   • Implement  the  steps  for  designing  and  planning  a  ceramic  project  using  multiple   handbuilding  concepts  covered  in  Units  2-­‐4.   • Demonstrate  their  understanding  and  ability  to  collect  visual  information  and   references,  and  then  successfully  apply  use  of  research  and  imagery  into  their  final   artwork.     • Combine  design  and  exploration  experiences  and  exposures  to  create  a  final   handbuilt  ceramic  project.     • Demonstrate  and  apply  understanding  of  the  firing  process.   • Demonstrate  and  apply  understanding  of  finishing  options.   • Understand  that  a  well-­‐planned  design  concept  is  essential  to  creating  a  successful   ceramics  end  product.     • Be  assessed  on  their  comprehension  and  application  of  ceramic  concepts,   vocabulary,  techniques  and  processes  covered  throughout  the  course  in  written   form.     • Reflect  on  the  development  of  the  creative  process.  
  • • Develop  an  awareness  for  common  assessment,  craftsmanship,  and  work  ethic   expectations  both  inside  and  outside  of  the  classroom.   • Determine  positive  habits  of  creating  and  working  with  a  sketchbook  for   brainstorming,  planning,  and  process  documentation.   • Assess  and  reflect  upon  their  work  and  the  work  of  their  peers  through  class   critiques  and  aesthetic  discussions  based  on  the  formal  qualities  of  their  artwork.    Relevant  Activities:   1. Develop  a  presentation  and  assignment  handout  outlining  a  conceptually  based   project  theme,  requirements  and  expectations  that  implements  multiple   handbuilding  techniques.   2. Check  for  understanding  of  expectations  and  techniques  through  class  discussions   and  sharing.   3. Create  visual  organizer  and  references  for  brainstorming,  idea  development  and   planning  specific  to  a  final  project.   4. Develop  a  culminating  final  project  with  a  conceptual  theme:   a. Functional  “Set  of…”     b. Place  setting  for  a  historical  or  popular  figure   c. Sculptural  cake  for  historic  or  popular  figure   5. Review,  implement  and  assess  for  understanding  processes  and  vocabulary  covered   throughout  the  course.   6. Culminate  in  class  critique,  where  teacher  and  students  reflect  on  strong  points,   dynamic  qualities,  and  offer  constructive  criticism  including  suggestions  for   improvements.      Relevant  Resources:   • Book:  Handbuilt  Pottery  Techniques  Revealed  by  Jacqui  Atkin,  2004   • Book:  Experience  Clay  by  Maureen  Mackey,  2003