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    • project documenta design process & tion by Shashidhar mangu
    • NID’s R&D Campus at Bangalore was set up as a joint initiative of and funding from the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP), Ministry of Commerce and Industry and the Ministry of Information Technology, Government of India and was inaugurated in March 2006. R&D Campus commenced two research intensive PG Pro- grammes namely Design for Retail Experience and Design for Digital Experience, from the academic year 2007-2008. From the academic year 2008-2009, the Campus has also commenced one more research intensive PG Programme, namely Information and Interface Design. The R&D Campus addresses the immediate need for an exclusive Design Research centre in the country, by fostering the creative design spirit and sight- ing new opportunities and frontiers through NID’s design acumen nurtured through teaching-learning process. National Institute of Design, Bangalore About Design For Retail Experience The increasingly competitive market has transformed shopping from just purchasing products to an experience and an activity in itself. The programme has an integrated approach to designing products, systems and spaces for enriched consumer experi- ences. Students have inputs on visual merchandising, trends, materials, technology and techniques. The programme offers a challenge to redefine boundaries, understand consumer lifestyles and aspirations in order to visualise and create new concepts for an outstanding shopping experience.
    • Eventually everything connects. People, ideas, objects. The qual- ity of the connections is the key to quality per se. -Charles Eames NID’s Design Philosophy Design is the professional capability of creating and developing concepts and realizing them into products and systems for the mutual benefit of both user and manufacturer. The design of ob- jects, services and systems require the synthesis and knowledge of a variety of disciplines. Design thinking brings together the finest sensibilities of the arts with the logic of science in an innova- tive framework. While learning a craft brings students close to materials and material culture, a design attitude and methodology helps them realize larger patterns and connections in the fabric of society. 03
    • Contents Project Introduction Understanding Project Synopsis & Brief customer engagement & omni channel retailing in-store digital solutions how brands are using in- store digital solutions... history of modern american retail 06 14 16 16 12 1 2 Primary research Final Design Concept Bibliography AppendixArriving at design directions Secondary research customer journey map: findings mapping persuasion mapping parameters on intervention areas questionnaire responses persuasion in design bj fogg’s behaviour model customer journey: intervention mapping customer journey map: attitudes & activities proposed model detailed model scenario solution artefacts primary solution mapping design directions persuasive design principles 27 4230 39 40 32 24 77 78 54 58 59 48 49 37 3 6 7 85 4
    • Project IntroductionProject Synopsis Project Brief 07
    • Next generation technologies like mobile, social, cloud, ana- lytics are changing the way people interact with organisa- tions, their social networks, applications & the way they cre- ate & consume information. These technologies have also impacted how applications are being developed, delivered & consumed across various devices, channels & contexts. These paradigm shifts call for a rethinking on how User Experiences are crafted into the applications with emphasis on the con- text, portability, integration, mobility & connectedness. The diploma project will be focused on identifying UX para- digms, scenarios and designing methodologies for next gen- eration applications cutting across web, mobile, social, ana- lytics for an American Retailer. Design Mobility & Digital applications for an American Departmental store to enhance customer engagement & in-store experience for the customers on interactive platforms Synopsis Brief Key words Customer Engagement In-Store Experience 09
    • Disclaimer: Though this project was for an American client, no research was conducted directly in America. Online surveys were conducted to capture American consumer insights. This project aims at creating generic model that can be applied anywhere based on common insights derived from American & Indian audience.
    • Understanding A brief look at the aspects surrounding the design brief & also a few desktop Case studies of some of the brands which are leveraging technology to enhance customers experience. Key words In-Store digital Solutions Case Studies Customer Engagement 11
    • Background: History of Modern American Retail 1900-1945 1945-1975 At the turn of the century, retailing was mainly dominated by mail-order merchants who of- fered a broad assortment of just about everything available on the market. Baby boomers drive post-war growth As WWII came to an end and soldiers returned home, the world entered a period of rebuilding and growth that impacted consumers needs for everything. Births took off, creating a “boom”. The so-called “baby boomers,” children who were born between 1946 and 1964, were 79 million strong. As consumer demand accelerated, retailers responded. They followed consumers to new sub- urbs being developed along major new interstate highways and built large shopping centres which became the new destinations for retailing. Prolific mall development catapulted many of retailers, such as Gap, Inc. (The Gap) and Limited Stores, LLC (The Limited), to national prominence. Market leaders included Sears, Roebuck and Co., Montgomery Ward, Inc. and J.C. Penney Company, Inc., all of whom published immense “books” became staples in every household in America. Modern retailing emerges Retail 2020: Reinventing retailing— once again A joint project between IBM and New York University Stern School of Business 12
    • 1975-2000 2000-present Mass market fragments Consumers take increasing control As baby boomers moved into their 30s and 40s and their incomes soared, they continued to spend on themselves and on their growing families. The Vietnam War, women’s rights move- ments, civil rights movements and rock and roll music all came together to create a new aware- ness among boomers that they controlled the future. With a huge advantage in terms of selection, convenience and pricing, and with the ability to provide expert information and product comparisons instantaneously, the Internet has quickly become a very serious shopping alternative to traditional “Brick and mortar” retailers. Amazon.com, Inc., launched in 1995, has quickly become a broad marketplace for many catego- ries of merchandise by offering unmatched selection, customised offers, high product availabil- ity, low-cost delivery, simple checkout and excellent pricing. With the Increasing Competition & Rise of Demanding Consumer the retailers are being forced to align their offering and strategies to the consumers needs. Speciality stores thrived. Even discounters became specialised. Category killers grew aggres- sively in the 1970s and 1980s into many product segments, including sporting goods, electron- ics, office supplies, home furnishings, books etc. Walmart emerged as a clear market leader in this period and forced many traditional discount- ers out of business as their supply chain efficiencies and sophisticated use of IT provided them with an undisputed price leadership position. Among the top 100 discounters that operated in 1976, only 24 remained in business by 1992. Toward the end of this period enabled by the launch of the “World Wide Web” in 1991, online retailing, or “e-commerce” as it was labelled, began to show up in the marketplace. 13
    • Customer Engagement Some pointers for better understanding... Omni channel retailing How customer engagement is Measured? Customer engagement is the constant interaction created by a brand or a company with its cus- tomers and also between its customers. Engagement can either be online or offline and could be initiated through various means depending on the platform i.e. online or offline. The various strategies through which the brand can engage its customers are Loyalty Programmes, In-Store events, online forums, blogs, social media etc to name a few. The top business goals of Customer Engagement are to Improve Customer perception, knowing the customer better, drive higher cus- tomer loyalty and increase sales. Omni Channel retailing is very similar to multi- channel retailing but aims at offers the always connected consumer the same brand experience across different channels i.e. mobile, web, brick- and-mortar, television, radio, direct mail, catalogue etc. The bricks-and-mortar stores become an extension of the supply chain in which purchases may be made in the store, but are researched through other “channels” of communication. According to Forrester Research the four dimensions of Customer engagement measurement are: Involvement — The presence of a person at the various brand touch points. Involvement met- rics include a count of visits to physical stores, trade show booths, call centres, and the company’s Web site. Interaction — The actions people take while present at key touch points. Examples of interac- tion include testing out merchandise in a store, conversing with employees, reading content on a Web site, taking a sales call, conducting a trial, watching a demo, and completing transactions. Intimacy — The affection or aversion a person holds for a brand. Intimacy metrics include overall brand affinity, brand perception, customer references given, and attitudes expressed by customers when talking about the brand to others. Influence — The likelihood a person will advocate on behalf of the brand. Influence metrics in- clude likelihood to recommend as well as actual recommendations to friends, family, colleagues, peers, and others. “By 2014, nearly everyone in the US will have access to a smartphone connected to the internet. Today the Consumer is in control and not the other way around. They decide when, where & how to shop and also influence others shopping decisions.” -retailcustomerexperience.com 14
    • “The top business goals of Customer Engagement are to Improve Customer perception, knowing the customer better, drive higher customer loyalty and increase sales.”
    • In-store digital solutions Interactive Kiosks The most popular kiosks are the ATM’s. Other Kiosks are Ticketing kiosks, Vending machines etc. In Retail Interactive kiosks help the customers access necessary information such as providing floor maps, browse retailer website, compare products, product demonstrations etc. Interactive kiosks could be deployed to accomplish one task or a multiple tasks or query’s. The types of applications that multi- function kiosks can support are limitless and are defined by each retailer’s customer demographics, merchandising offerings and pain points. Kiosks are majorly used as self-service tools. Digital Signage Digital signage’s are electronic displays deployed at various places aimed at delivering targeted con- tent depending on the people who arrive there. Digital signage can be updated as per the retailers need and saves the printing costs associated with static signs. The dynamic nature of digital signage also helps in grabbing customer’s attention. Various forms of digital signage are Customised Shelf talkers, Digital Menu boards, Digital Window displays, Interactive merchandising etc. Tablet Devices Tablet devices help in offering more personalised service. Automobile showrooms are using tablets to help customers in their car customisation process. In hospitality business hotels like the Four Seasons and J.W. Marriott are testing the use of in-room tablets. Tablets in hotels offer the opportunity for easier check-in, customised service through the use of guest profiles, and a menu of concierge ser- vices with easy connectivity. They can even act as multi-purpose control panels for in-room devices. In Restaurants Tablets provide the flexibility of digital menus, self-service ordering, and access to food ingredient lists and calorie counts. They offer opportunities for increasing engagement through promo- tions and social media. Tablets can be used by both customers and in-store personnel. For customers, the tablet serves as an extension of the website and as a comparison shopper. For the salesperson, tab- lets can be a powerful customer service tool. If a retailer develops a specific tablet application, it can provide more information than simple access to the website. A tablet application can integrate with inventory management, connect the salesperson with similar stores across the country and acts as POS. Deployers of tablets may need a customised solution for display to adapt to the context of its use. 16
    • How brands are using in-store digital solutions... Kraft foods Kraft Foods Group Inc. is an American grocery manufacturing and processing conglomerate. Kraft foods found out that an average shopper has a paltry 10 recipes in his or her average meal-time rotation: Spaghetti, pizza, hamburgers, chicken, etc. They also found that 70% of shoppers enter the store without a clue as to what to serve that night for dinner. So they devised the Kraft foods Meal plan- ning in-store kiosk which aims at expanding an average shopper’s meal recipe choices. When a shopper stands in front of the kiosk, a camera equipped with Anonymous Video analytics soft- ware zooms in on his or her face to determine the shopper’s age and gender. The kiosk then suggests Kraft products it thinks the shopper will enjoy. The Kraft Meal Planning Solution, created in conjunction with Intel, lets users customise their experience based on their reason for the shopping trip. NASCAR The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) sanctions and governs multiple auto racing sports events. NASCAR fans are some of the most passionate in the world. With the increas- ing on venue usage of smart phones at the event and even at home NASCAR wants to extend its race watching experience without diluting the real world experience. NASCAR plans to deliver customised and personalised information of favourite drivers, their current race analytics, real time information about their cars etc. 17
    • How brands are using in-store digital solutions... Sephora Sephora is a French brand and chain of cosmetics stores founded in Paris in 1970. Featuring more than 100 brands, along with its own private label, Sephora offers beauty products including makeup, skincare, body, fragrance, colour, and haircare. Sephora’s in-store Scentsa touchscreen kiosk lets visitors explore fragrances through multiple paths, such as by brand or by fragrance note. The responsive touchscreen offers shoppers helpful product information. When a shopper finds something of his/her interest it allows them to email or scan the QR code to pull up the product on their phone. Sephora Skincare iQ helps customers choose skincare products that match their skin type. Whether it’s wrinkles, dark spots, visible pores, or any other concern, Skincare iQ finds the top-performing products available at Sephora to address skin needs. It also solves the daunting task of selecting the right founda- tion for a given skin colour. The device is used to scan the skin and syncs the data wirelessly with an ipad. Based on that data the system recommends the best suited foundation from thousands of options. “Seva Beauty a salon located in Walmart stores offers a full range of services, in- cluding manicures, pedicures and eyebrow threading. Each Seva Beauty location has at least one iPad, used for check-in and check- out. A secondary iPad also is used as a POS system. The iPads encourage up-selling my promoting daily specials when the customers check-in.” 18
    • “Luxury brands have always understood that, more than just the product, their customers are buying ser- vice, membership of an exclusive club and a shared philosophy.” -Insights 2013: Redefining experiences through connected thinking by Sapientnitro
    • Primary Research Primary research was carried out in the form of mapping the Customer journeys & conducting On- line & Offline Questionnaires. Online Questionnaires were answered by 15 American & Europeans put together and a few NRI’s. Offline Questionnaires were conducted in uptown Koramangala and Platinum City Township, which are home to upper middle class-wealthy demographics. A total of 60 interviews were done through questionnaires. Through Secondary research insights & directions were derived from research papers. Key words Journey Maps Questionnaires User Shadowing 21
    • procedure: Collating observational data from user shadowing & contextual enquiry. Customer Journey Mapping 23
    • DISCOVERY STAGE PRE-BUYING PHASE CUSTOMERJOURNEY:ACTIVITIES&ATTITUDES Product discovery through various channels. Product information & research gathering through different channels Consumer questions relating to products. Key words:Key words: Product could be discovered through various channels. In most cases an impulse to buy is triggered if the consumer finds the product irresistible. In other cases there is a genuine need of the product. This stage is mainly dominated by information gathering by the consumers. This is either done In-Store or Online. For categories like grocery there isn’t much pre-shopping research. Where as for electronics or for products there is substantial investment, consumers spend good amount of time in research before they arrive at a decision. A look at how the consumer gathers information. Billboards Internet In-Store Search engine, Forums, Websites, User Reviews, Expert reviews, Video Reviews What are my needs? Do I really need this product? How is this model different from the other? Confusion, Genuinity of information, Trust, Product ExperienceNeed Creation, Branding Is it worth the money i spend? Which products best serves my needs? Consultation with family & friends, Co-browsing with friends, general discussions etc. Visit the store for product experience, Seek the help of store associates. Retailer websites do self-promotion. So not-trustworthy Not everyone knows about every product. Sometimes not sure of sales associates knowledge of products. Not really of great use. Can not experience the products physically Uncertain information. Can touch & feel the products. Product comparison is easyOnline reviews are unbiased Fair feedback. Trustworthy Not easy to find sales associates at times Good to ledge complaints Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Retailer helpline, Fix demo on request TV ads Peers Peers Telephone Social Media & Internet Newspaper Store visits NegativeReaction/Perception PositiveReaction/Perception 24
    • IN-STORE POST-SHOPPING Key words: Key words: Investment heavy productsGrocery & immediate needs In this phase the decision to buy is more or less done. But there are still some consultations with the store associates before the consumer takes the final call. This holds specially true for electronic goods. Grocery shopping is more of a clear mission based shopping. A look at what happens when the consumer is at the store In most cases the relation between the retailer and the customer seems to endafter the purchase. But its very crucial to address customers needs post- purchase. A look at post-purchase scenario. Documents Review Post Purchase Service Bills, Warranty cards, User manuals, Coupons etc. Review product or retailer service May or may not carry shopping lists While enquiring about the products While attending to consumer query’s A little bit of final information gathering is done before going ahead to buy the product. A lot of store associate interaction happens at this stage. Payment & loyalty Arrives at the store. Parks the vehicle Enters the store Constantly uses the mobile to attend calls, use shopping apps etc 1 1 2 2 3 Lists, Loyalty cards, Product information, Offers, Genuine information, Confidence Positive or Negative Reviews, Refer, Product management There are too many documents Can I contact the dept.store in case of damage? Might need help in product assembly. Might not need warranty cards in near future. Finding the product model no is tough. Its hidden somewhere. Store warranty cards even after expiry. Is my warranty still valid? Finds it difficult to find parking slots at times Use manuals are not useful for more than few times Who exactly do i contact? May or may not refer the retailer/product to a friend. Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Lists Signage Product Selection Customer & Store associate interaction Consumer Product Selection Check-out I can remember them Is the information pro- vided by store associate genuine. Finds customer infor- mation depending on product type I Might not know all product information Be up to date with changing technology Signage is not accurate Mostly use the regularly used brands Check out is tedious when there are long ques. Helps me not miss the products i have to shop Is he trained enough? I should check from other stores as well. Helps me partially. No Offers on products of my interest Loyalty cards do not yield any benefits. Searching for signage itself is a problem Check for similar products on offer. Loyalty cards is a waste of time Use loyalty cards only when large sum is spent Consumer attitudes: Attitudes: Attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Store associate PeersSocial Media & Internet Channels 25
    • Customer journey maps made it easy in terms of getting into the mind of the shopper and understanding what is preventing them to perform certain tasks and also what are the issues they face in a physical store. A few ques- tions were asked to the users both during and after the shopping depending on the context. Questions were not asked at places where it was felt that the outcome would be influenced by the presence of the third party. Customer journey maps gave a direction in terms of preparing the Questionnaires to garner more insights and to also to validate the existing ones.
    • customer journey map : findings Some good insights were drawn through analysis of the customer tasks throughout customer journey mapping. They are: -In the early stages of deciding or pre-shopping process customers found it difficult to decide which is the product that fulfills their needs. Even though they depended heavily on online reviews sometimes they were disappointed with the product purchase later. -Customers who went to experience the products in the store before making a final decision didn’t have a healthy trust over the salesmen. Customers sometimes couldn’t get the information they have asked for from the salesperson. This made the customers skeptical about the information offered by the salesperson. Sometimes they felt the salesperson was not trained enough. The sales person too sometimes felt bad when couldn’t address the customer queries. -Post purchase customers really felt it difficult to main a record of old purchases, bills, and more importantly the warranty cards and related data. They felt it really gruesome to find out the product model numbers in times of any service enquiry with the retailer or concerned service providers since most of the time model numbers are on the rear side and its difficult to find it out in cases of heavy products or installed ones. -Some found it difficult to analyse their spending patterns. 27
    • Customer journey map : Findings In a supermarket it was observed that people were moving all over the place in search of products or when they felt they had forgotten something to pick up in a particular section before moving on to the next one. And one more major obser- vation was that many people even though had loyalty cards didn’t really use them because of few reasons: -They didn’t know how they use the points they accumulate through loyalty cards -They didn’t know how many points they had in their account. In a way they didn’t know where to check the points in their account. -Other major observation was that different members from a family went to buy at the store on various occasions and it was not necessary all of them had the loyalty card or there was only one card for the house. -People felt that they wouldn’t benefit if they bought few products. They felt that buying good amount of buying only gained them points. Incidentally most of them would buy something every now and then in 2 or 3 days. -Interestingly people felt lazy to take out the card to swipe. They felt it was ok not to swipe. 28
    • Improving Product selection process. Especially when it comes to electronics. Trust issues between customer & store associates. Motivating Consumers to use Loyalty card regularly. Helping consumers to plan their store visit in a better way. Helping consumers to navigate in a store better. Help consumers in product management post-purchase. 3 4 5 6 2 1 POTENTIAL AREAS THAT NEEDED ATTENTION: 29
    • Questionnaires* were prepared to find out two major things: -Hindrances during a decision making pro- cess during shopping. -Shopping experiences they enjoyed the most. Questionnaire Responses “Wanted to buy an expensive SLR camera - Did the homework, knew what I wanted. The knowledge of the salesman blew me away. He was very helpful, convinced me to buy a better lens, never pushed me to buy filters, offered free tutorial classes, price was as good as the mail order purchase and never forced me to buy the product. I went back after a week to buy the camera I wanted.” “I have different criteria for different types of products- some food products are based on quality, others on cost. Electronics are generally to fill a specific need and brand loyalty. Clothing is price, need and style.” “When there are multiple products which have a difference of one or two fea- tures and the price differs a lot. Example: Galaxy S4 & S3.” 30 *Complete Questionnaire in appendix
    • 31 “I always enjoy going to Target, no store in Europe matches that experiences for me. The stores are always clean, they have almost no smells in them, things are easy to find, and they have hip and young products as well as everyday items. They are inexpensive but not cheap meaning there products are of de- cent quality. (Unlike Walmart) There hours are also nice, they are open early and close late.” “My purchase at a departmental store was most memorable. I have been there for a pair of shoes. I was a bit confused about the model and brand. But Nike store in Hyundai Department store, Seoul - made my decision clear with great demonstration and clear display of products. They work as an academic centre, where they educate us about the product usability. They gave me chance to experience more than 6 different categories, where I learned the design intrica- cies. Finally I bought 2 pairs of shoes.” “I am hindered when there are too many options and not enough information for me to make an informed decision.” major findings from the questionnaires were: —People wanted discounts on the products they liked. In a way they didn’t really care about discount on other products. One shopper in the store even found it intrusive to their in store activity. People felt well informed staff had resulted in better shopping experiences apart form good ambience & being pampered. —One of the key finding was that many people do not understand key technical infor- mation relating to electronic goods which hinders their decision making. Specific needs and understandable technical information play a major role in decision making. —People felt it was difficult for them make decisions when they have too many choices. This was very much aligned with views of Barry Schwartz & Sheena Iyengar. Barry Schwartz is a psychologist and author of ‘The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less’ and a TED speaker on the same topic Sheena Iyengar is the author of ‘The Art of Choosing’ and a TED speaker on the same topic
    • DISCOVERY STAGE PRE-BUYING PHASE MAPPINGPOSSIBLEINTERVENTIONAREASONCJMAP Product information & research gathering through different channels Consumer questions relating to products. Key words:Key words: Product could be discovered through various channels. In most cases an impulse to buy is triggered if the consumer finds the product irresistible. In other cases there is a genuine need of the product. This stage is mainly dominated by information gathering by the consumers. This is either done In-Store or Online. For categories like grocery there isn’t much pre-shopping research. Where as for electronics or for products there is substantial investment, consumers spend good amount of time in research before they arrive at a decision. A look at how the consumer gathers information. Billboards Internet In-Store Search engine, Forums, Websites, User Reviews, Expert reviews, Video Reviews What are my needs? Do I really need this product? How is this model different from the other? Confusion, Genuinity of information, Trust, Product ExperienceNeed Creation, Branding Is it worth the money i spend? Which products best serves my needs? Consultation with family & friends, Co-browsing with friends, general discussions etc. Visit the store for product experience, Seek the help of store associates. Retailer websites do self-promotion. So not-trustworthy Not everyone knows about every product. Sometimes not sure of sales associates knowledge of products. Not really of great use. Can not experience the products physically Uncertain information. Can touch & feel the products. Product comparison is easyOnline reviews are unbiased Fair feedback. Trustworthy Not easy to find sales associates at times Good to ledge complaints Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Retailer helpline, Fix demo on request TV ads Peers Peers Telephone Social Media & Internet Newspaper Store visits Product discovery through various channels. new or related product allerts guidelines for product selection search products by preferences kiosks for product search by needs & preferences clear information of product abilities STAGE1:ACTIVITIES&ATTITUDES 32
    • 33 IN-STORE POST-SHOPPING Key words: Key words: Investment heavy productsGrocery & immediate needs In most cases the relation between the retailer and the customer seems to endafter the purchase. But its very crucial to address customers needs post- purchase. A look at post-purchase scenario. Documents Review Post Purchase Service Bills, Warranty cards, User manuals, Coupons etc. Review product or retailer service May or may not carry shopping lists While enquiring about the products While attending to consumer query’s A little bit of final information gathering is done before going ahead to buy the product. A lot of store associate interaction happens at this stage. Payment & loyalty Arrives at the store. Parks the vehicle Enters the store Constantly uses the mobile to attend calls, use shopping apps etc 1 1 2 2 3 Lists, Loyalty cards, Product information, Offers, Genuine information, Confidence Positive or Negative Reviews, Refer, Product management There are too many documents Can I contact the dept.store in case of damage? Might need help in product assembly. Might not need warranty cards in near future. Finding the product model no is tough. Its hidden somewhere. Store warranty cards even after expiry. Is my warranty still valid? Finds it difficult to find parking slots at times Use manuals are not useful for more than few times Who exactly do i contact? May or may not refer the retailer/product to a friend. Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Lists Signage Product Selection Customer & Store associate interaction Consumer Product Selection Check-out I can remember them Is the information pro- vided by store associate genuine. Finds customer infor- mation depending on product type I Might not know all product information Be up to date with changing technology Signage is not accurate Mostly use the regularly used brands Check out is tedious when there are long ques. Helps me not miss the products i have to shop Is he trained enough? I should check from other stores as well. Helps me partially. No Offers on products of my interest Loyalty cards do not yield any benefits. Searching for signage itself is a problem Check for similar products on offer. Loyalty cards is a waste of time Use loyalty cards only when large sum is spent Consumer attitudes: Attitudes: Attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Store associate PeersSocial Media & Internet Channels In this phase the decision to buy is more or less done. But there are still some consultations with the store associates before the consumer takes the final call. This holds specially true for electronic goods. Grocery shopping is more of a clear mission based shopping. A look at what happens when the consumer is at the store welcome messages on entry co-browse with store associate fix appointments for product demos warranty expiry alerts product usage videos equip with tablet for product search as per con- sumer preferences live feeds of in store sales one point access to all documents track post shop- ping experience easy loyalty card usage & points redemption
    • “What makes people passionate, pure and simple, is great experiences. If they have great experience with your product and they have great experiences with your service, they’re going to be passionate about your brand, they’re going to be committed to it. That’s how you build that kind of commitment.” – Jesse James Garrett
    • Secondary ResearchExploring pertinent & appropriate models of customer engagement: Today’s easy access to information and too much social influences makes it difficult for brands to persuade them. It wouldn’t be wrong to say that today’s customers are highly apprehensive about the information that brands push on to various media. They find it too intrusive. Customers are naturally inclined towards those brands which offer solutions to their real life situations. Simply coming up with a service doesn’t mean that the customers will accept or adapt it. To engage the customer’s brands need to address their needs and goals. But how do they do it? So, Secondary research was done on different persuasion and engagement models. Key words Persuasion Behaviour Motivation Engagement 35
    • Designing for persuasion means not merely creating usable solutions but actually designing solutions to help consumers in accomplishing tasks and gaining custom- ers trust. Business goals are achieved once a desired task in accomplished by the customer or the user. Customers need to be emotionally assured that they are heading in the right direction. Brands should help customers make informed choices. Making things easy, relevant, and trustworthy by building persuasive features into the interface helps to achieve desired user behaviours—ones that align with the product’s business objectives. DESIGN FOR PERSUASION36
    • 37 Based on an understanding of the context, content, users & system features can be built that guide the user and motivate him to a better use of the system facilities. by Marianne Lykke Tailoring, Reduction, and Tunnelling may ease complex query formulation through sim- plifying the user-system interaction. Princi- ples of suggestion, surveillance and monitor- ing may be used to inform and encourage the user to take advance of system features. PERSUASIVE DESIGN PRINCIPLES Reduction Making actions or information a simple as possible. The strategy of Reduction is a means to ease user action by automation. Tailoring Customizing actions or information to user needs and characteristics Conditioning Shaping behaviour by rewarding a certain behaviour Tunneling Leading users through a predetermined se- quence of actions or events Suggestions Suggesting a certain action or behaviour at the most opportune moment. Surveillance Monitoring the behaviour of another to modify behaviour in a specific way Self monitoring Monitoring behaviour in order to modify actions or behaviour to achieve a predeter- mined goal or outcome Marianne Lykke, Associate professor, PhD, (Information Interaction and Architecture, Royal School of Library and Information Science, Denmark)
    • Concept that focuses on how a struc- ture or system, as viewed by the users, meets their needs and requirements. BEHAVIOUR DESIGN 38
    • 39 Depending on the business goals and customers characteristics, the barriers and triggers to de- sired user behaviours will vary. Any one of six universal principles of social influence can act as a catalyst to trigger an emotional response: In addition to the principles of social influence, there are psychological principles designers can leverage to increase engagement and help people to make informed choices. Making things easy, relevant, and trustworthy by building persuasive features into the interface helps elicit desired user behaviours—ones that align with the product’s business objectives. by Elisa del Galdo PERSUASION IN DESIGN Reciprocation We feel obliged to return favours. Liking The more we like people, the more we want to say yes to them. Authority We look to experts. Social Proof We look to others to guide our behaviour. Commitment/Consistency We want to act consistently with our com- mitments and values. Scarcity The less available a resource, the more we want it. The Power of Free We are prone to go for free things, even if they come at a price later. Susceptible Moments Opportunities to cross- and up-sell must be timely so that they are delivered at the point at which people are most receptive. Saving for Tomorrow People are much more likely to make a commitment to spend money in the future than to spend it today. Positive Reinforcement Letting customers know when they are doing well will keep them engaged. Loss Aversion People do not like to lose things once they have them, so alerting customers when they are about to lose out on something is an opportunity to maintain engagement. Completeness By nature, we feel the need to fill in gaps. Elisa del Galdo is Director of UX at Flow Interactive, specialists in User-Centered De- sign and user experience. She holds a BS in Biology and an MS in Industrial Engineering and has over 20 years’ experience in HCI.
    • Motivation, Ability and triggers form the basis of the Fogg’s behaviour model. By understanding what’s preventing target behaviour and applying the parameters of motivation, ability and triggers the desired behaviours can be achieved. A peek into Fogg’s model: by DR.BJ FOGG BJ FOGG’S BEHAVIOUR MODEL 1. Motivation Motivation: It consists of three dimensions: -Pleasure/Pain -Hope/Fear -Social Acceptance/Rejection Pleasure/Pain Pleasure/pain is a primitive response, and it functions adaptively in activities related to self-preservation and propagation of our genes. Pleasure and pain are powerful moti- vators. To boost levels of motivation pleasure and pain can be embodied. This motivator type may not be the ideal approach, especial- ly pain, but a thorough review of motivation means at least acknowledging these options. Hope/Fear This dimension is characterized by anticipa- tion of an outcome. Hope is the anticipation of something good happening. Fear is the anticipation of something bad, often the anticipation of loss. For example, people are motivated by hope when then joining a dating web site. They are motivated by fear when they update settings in virus software. Social Acceptance /Rejection People always want to make their mark socially. They want to be socially accepted. People are motivated to do things that win them social acceptance. Perhaps even more dramatically, people are motivated to avoid being socially rejected. And perhaps this is the success between most of the social networking sites. 40 Hope/Fear This dimension is characterized by anticipa- tion of an outcome. Hope is the anticipation of something good happening. Fear is the anticipation of something bad, often the anticipation of loss. For example, people are motivated by hope when then joining a dating web site. They are motivated by fear when they update settings in virus software. Social Acceptance /Rejection People always want to make their mark socially. They want to be socially accepted. People are motivated to do things that win them social acceptance. Perhaps even more dramatically, people are motivated to avoid being socially rejected. And perhaps this is the success between most of the social networking sites. Hope/Fear This dimension is characterized by anticipa- tion of an outcome. Hope is the anticipation of something good happening. Fear is the anticipation of something bad, often the anticipation of loss. For example, people are motivated by hope when then joining a dating web site. They are motivated by fear when they update settings in virus software. Social Acceptance /Rejection People always want to make their mark socially. They want to be socially accepted. People are motivated to do things that win them social acceptance. Perhaps even more dramatically, people are motivated to avoid being socially rejected. And perhaps this is the success between most of the social networking sites.
    • 41 3.Trigger A trigger is something that tells people to perform a behaviour now. It is a ‘call-to- action’. Triggers can make the user act on impulse. There are three types of triggers: sparks, facilitators, and signals. Spark A spark is a motivation element used when a user lacks motivation to perform target behaviour. Facilitator It is an element used when a user is moti- vated but lacks the ability to perform target behaviour. Facilitator makes the target behav- iour easy or simple for the user to perform. Triggers Triggers Behaviour=Motivation+Ability+Trigger AbilityHard to do Easy to do Fail here succeed here at the same time Low Motivation High Motivation Motivation Social Acceptance /Rejection People always want to make their mark so- cially. They want to be socially accepted. Peo- ple are motivated to do things that win them social acceptance. Perhaps even more dra- matically, people are motivated to avoid being socially rejected. And perhaps this is the suc- cess between most of the social networking sites. 2.Ability It is the user trained enough or knowledgeable enough to accomplish a desired task? The users should be capable of achieve of a target behaviour. There are two ways to go about it. One is to make tasks easy for the user to perform or train them which is a tougher part since People are generally resistant to teaching and training because it requires effort. This clashes with the natu- ral wiring of human adults: We are fundamentally lazy. So we have to basically make it simple and east for the users to achieve the target behaviours. The different dimensions of simplicity are: Time, Money, Physical effort, Brain Cycles, Social Deviance & Non-Routine. Each person has a different simplicity profile. Some people have more time, some people have more money, and some people can invest brain cycles, while others cannot. These factors vary by the individual, but they also vary by the context. BJ Fogg is a professor and founder of the “Persuasive technology lab” at the Stanford University.
    • DISCOVERY STAGE PRE-BUYING PHASE MAPPINGPERSUASIONPARAMETERSONINTERVENTIONAREAS Product information & research gathering through different channels Consumer questions relating to products. Key words:Key words: Product could be discovered through various channels. In most cases an impulse to buy is triggered if the consumer finds the product irresistible. In other cases there is a genuine need of the product. This stage is mainly dominated by information gathering by the consumers. This is either done In-Store or Online. For categories like grocery there isn’t much pre-shopping research. Where as for electronics or for products there is substantial investment, consumers spend good amount of time in research before they arrive at a decision. A look at how the consumer gathers information. Billboards Internet In-Store Search engine, Forums, Websites, User Reviews, Expert reviews, Video Reviews What are my needs? Do I really need this product? How is this model different from the other? Confusion, Genuinity of information, Trust, Product ExperienceNeed Creation, Branding Is it worth the money i spend? Which products best serves my needs? Consultation with family & friends, Co-browsing with friends, general discussions etc. Visit the store for product experience, Seek the help of store associates. Retailer websites do self-promotion. So not-trustworthy Not everyone knows about every product. Sometimes not sure of sales associates knowledge of products. Not really of great use. Can not experience the products physically Uncertain information. Can touch & feel the products. Product comparison is easyOnline reviews are unbiased Fair feedback. Trustworthy Not easy to find sales associates at times Good to ledge complaints Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Consumer Perceptions: Retailer helpline, Fix demo on request TV ads Peers Peers Telephone Social Media & Internet Newspaper Store visits Product discovery through various channels. new or related product alerts guidelines for product selection search products by preferences kiosks for product search by needs & preferences clear information of product abilities Triggers Susceptible Moments Tailoring Reduction Tailoring STAGE2:INTERVENTIONAREASSTAGE1:ACTIVITIES&ATTITUDES 42
    • 43 IN-STORE POST-SHOPPING Key words: Key words: Investment heavy productsGroccery & immediate needs In most cases the relation between the retailer and the customer seems to endafter the purchase. But its very crucial to address customers needs post- purchase. A look at post-purchase scenario. Documents Review Post Purchase Service Bills, Warranty cards, User manuals, Coupons etc. Review product or retailer service May or may not carry shopping lists While enquiring about the products While attending to consumer query’s A little bit of final information gathering is done before going ahead to buy the product. A lot of store associate interaction happens at this stage. Payment & loyalty Arrives at the store. Parks the vehicle Enters the store Constantly uses the mobile to attend calls, use shopping apps etc 1 1 2 2 3 Lists, Loyalty cards, Product information, Offers, Genuine information, Confidence Positive or Negative Reviews, Refer, Product management There are too many documents Can I contact the dept.store in case of damage? Might need help in product assembly. Might not need warranty cards in near future. Finding the product model no is tough. Its hidden somewhere. Store warranty cards even after expiry. Is my warranty still valid? Finds it difficult to find parking slots at times Use manuals are not useful for more than few times Who exactly do i contact? May or may not refer the retailer/product to a friend. Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Lists Signage Product Selection Customer & Store associate interaction Consumer Product Selection Check-out I can remember them Is the information pro- vided by store associate genuine. Finds customer infor- mation depending on product type I Might not know all product information Be up to date with changing technology Signage is not accurate Mostly use the regularly used brands Check out is tedious when there are long ques. Helps me not miss the products i have to shop Is he trained enough? I should check from other stores as well. Helps me partially. No Offers on products of my interest Loyalty cards do not yield any benefits. Searching for signage itself is a problem Check for similar products on offer. Loyalty cards is a waste of time Use loyalty cards only when large sum is spent Consumer attitudes: Attitudes: Attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Consumer attitudes: Store associate PeersSocial Media & Internet Channels In this phase the decision to buy is more or less done. But there are still some consultations with the store associates before the consumer takes the final call. This holds specially true for electronic goods. Grocery shopping is more of a clear mission based shopping. A look at what happens when the consumer is at the store welcome messages on entry co-browse with store associate fix appointments for product demos warranty expiry alerts product usage videos equip with tablet for product search as per con- sumer preferences live feeds of in store sales one point access to all documents track post shop- ping experience easy loyalty card usage & points redemption Ability Completeness Completeness Positive Reinforcement Positive Reinforcement Positive Reinforcement Authority Trigger Social Proof
    • “The details are not the details. They make the design” - Charles Eames
    • Though there are negative aspects in the current systems that need attention, the way they need to addressed turns out to be critical. It is believed that the solution to be thought about should aim at providing a better experience and not just address entities that would be independent of each other. Meaning, an ecosystem of offerings should be thought about that would motivate the con- sumer by instilling trust and also serve the retailers business goals. Key words Persuasion Engagement Business goals Motivation Better Experience Secondary Research Takeaways: 45
    • Design Directions Arriving at Through research it was concluded that Product Research, Shopping & Post-shopping phases were the areas where there was a lot of scope for bettering the experience. It is believed that by mapping out the primary solution explorations a model could be derived which would form a blue print of offerings for the retailer. 47
    • Billboards TV ads Sustain/Live upto customers expectations Integrated & Immersive Experience zones Tablet Equipped Store associates Address Questions Peers Need based product search Bend screens & Touch screens Need based product search Product selection guidelines Customer Info Social Media & Internet Newspaper In-Store Kiosks At-Home Need Creation Increased Expectation Research Phase Ability Indexing Ability Comparison entice empower with relevant information PRE-SHOPPINGDISCOVERY
    • Personalises messages at entry Warranty expiry alerts Single Point Integration of Loyalty Points After few days of product purchase Loyalty points redeem Loyalty points redeem Product Servicing Live feeds of instore sales In-Store navigation Shopping/Wish lists Loyalty Points Coupons Quantify Track experience by easy rating system. Address issues if any Warranty Facilitate Redemption Facilitate Redemption Renew warranty services Set targets based on interests Suggest discounts on related products Easy service, store model number for later reference Shopping History entice engageenable empower WHILE SHOPPING POST-SHOPPING To create a Motivational & Engaging ecosys- tem with Product & Process driven solutions with an aim to better customers experience with the brand. The three parameters that form the core of this ecosystem are Entice, Empower & Engage. Each parameter would have various activities and user actions to achieve the desired outcome. DESIGN DIRECTION: Entice Empower Engage 49
    • Design Fr Conceptual model for
    • ramework 51
    • The Design solution provides an ecosystem which is motivating, engaging & consistent in ad- dressing both user & business needs . It does so by providing solutions to the existing issues and also creating a few more services that are user centric. It serves the business goals of the retailers by plugging in services to the ecosystem of user centric solutions along customer journey. Enticing is a way to connect the customer to the brand emotionally. It is a way to attract the cus- tomers. It helps in living up to the customers expectations after their initial connect with them. Providing the consumers with the relevant and personalised information empowers them to get over ambiguity and take informed decision quickly. Constantly taking care of consumer needs at different points of consumption cycle helps not only in gaining trust of the consumer but also helps the retailer in achieving the business objectives. proposed model for enhancing motivation and engagement: 52
    • 53 While the Entice, Empower & Engage form the three pillars of the model, The middle circle shows What actions are to be taken under each param- eter. The outermost circle shows How the actions needs to be executed. functional relationships of the components of the model:
    • PARAMETER Welcome messages at entry Creating integrated & immer- sive experience zones in-store Alerts before product war- ranty expiry Product demo video’s Advanced product search Points earned through loyalty C0-browse with in-store as- sociates Track experience post-shopping Promote related products based on previous buys detailed functional relationships of
    • WHAT HOW The retailer can deliver a very personalised experience to the user when he is at the store front. This can act as a positive reinforcement These zones act as product educational hubs with in the store which mesmerize the consumers & helps in living up to their expectation Reminding the customer about his product warranty expiry a few days in advance will help him contemplate about a renewal. Retailer can also extend his scope of services. Product assembly & tutorial videos generated by experts users especially in case of craftsman tools help the buyers gain knowledge of different ways of using the tools People purchasing goods have specific needs when buying products. If the system could match the requirements to the product abilities relevant products could be searched Most of the time customers do not have a track of their loyalty points status which hinders the success of a loyalty program. It’s important to keep them informed It’s an important step towards creating a personalised experience to the customer and gain their trust and also take load off the associate for gaining access to product info By tracking customers shopping experience the retailer can gain an insight into the areas where they can improve. It also helps in making the customers feel important, To upsell or cross sell the retailer could analyse the customers previous purchases and recommend him related products through messages or when he is back in the store Messages can be delivered to the customer on his smart phone Huge screens operated through touch surfaces could be used in-store for product demo’s Mobile could be used as a channel primary channel. Other channel could be e-mail E-mailing the buyer after he has purchased the prod- uct helps in making him feel important Creating a product search engine by indexing the technical, physical and other abilities of the products Quantifying and showing the customer loyalty points and letting him set targets helps retailer in gaining trust Delivering relevant information through apps made specifically for in-store associate needs An experience tracking system that lets the customers rate with ease over a few parameters. Notify through different channels like mobile, e-mail etc. the components of the model 55
    • 56
    • 57 Since todays consumer is technology and information savvy, By linking all the key customer data like Loyalty points, Warranty data, Shopping history, Shopping lists, Bills etc it can be made easy for the consumer to access the key information across devices . Data becomes key to the strat- egy in addressing some of the major pain points observed through research. By integrating or registering the credit cards into the account provided by the retailer the con- cept of loyalty card can be get rid off which many consumer felt no value of. So every time the consumer uses the credit card in-store or online the loyalty points get deposited in the account. Even for the smallest of the purchase. Doing so creates value both for the consumer and retailer. It also helps the retailer in analysing each consumers buying trends which could be used to deliver a more personalised service by predictive analysis. CONNECTIVITY & STRATEGY Amazon: Amazon recommends products by analysing Past purchases, likes, similar purchases by other customers & Items in Customers virtual shopping carts. Okcupid: Okcupid generates match percentages with other compatible singles by analysis keywords in the profiles, user ratings of each other & answers to personal questions. Pandora: Pandora recommends new music by analysing users likes on songs, artists & genres. Netflix & IMDB use similar techniques. HOW BRANDS ARE USING PREDICTIVE ANALYSIS...
    • KEY INSIGHTS FROM RESEARCH Consumers were not motivated enough to use the loyalty cards for the reasons being: Access to loyalty accounts were tough, ignorant about what could be done with the loyalty points and swiping loyalty card at the billing counter was perceived as a tedi- ous or unnecessary action. Due to this ,the very purpose of loyalty cards is not being served. Consumers felt that they would be happy if they received discounts on the products they are interested in buying. But this hardly happened. Lot of time is wasted in the store searching for products. By linking customers credit card to loyalty programme they get points every time they make a purchase at the retailer, ei- ther online or in-store. Since using credit card is a very natural action while making a payment the need of a separate loyalty card can be completely diminished there by reducing one user action. Though many people did not prepare shopping lists, they help the retailer to understand the consumers needs and offer deals accordingly. This is could motivate the customers to prepare shopping lists. By showing consumers the product location in the store saves them a lot of time. Based on the shopping lists & shopping his- tory the retailer can push related products and offers which would act as triggers to up sell or cross sell. THE ABOVE ISSUES WOULD BE ADDRESSED BY DOING THE FOLLOWING: Linking customer credit card to loyalty program Create personalised offers based on shopping lists Due to the time constraints the design solution was limited to Grocery scenario. Draw in-store maps based on shopping lists SCENARIO: GROCERY & GENERAL NEEDS SHOPPING 1 1 2 3 2 3
    • Smart phone would be used by the consumer to create Shopping lists, Check & Share loyalty points, Set targets with loyalty points, Add friends/peers . The idea of a digitally enabled shopping cart is aimed at addressing the needs of the shopper while navigating through the store. The idea of fixing a dedicated interactive screen to a cart is unique in a sense that it doesn’t hinder the natural shopper activity & behaviour in a store which does not hold true in case of a personal mobile device. A personal mobile device requires dedi- cated attention to use in terms of handling it and shopping simultaneously. The Digital cart would analyse the lists of the shopper once he check’s in to the store through the device and would offer deals or product recommendations. This can be done by analysing the contents of the customers list & also his/her previous purchases which would help in up- selling or cross selling without being too intrusive by pushing sales through the device. It would also help in engaging the customer in the store and retaining him for a longer time by guiding him to explore more options. Modern shoppers do their product research before they come to the store or they are already educated about a product. So they are more or less very clear about what they would like to buy. Now it is important for the store to guide the already educated customer to the product. The main activities that the solution support is: -In-store navigation to help customers reach their products. -Making sure that the customer doesn’t miss any product that is on his list. -Cross sell & Up-sell Self-checkout would also have been incorporated but due to too many complications involved it was eliminated. SOLUTION ARTEFACT: INTERACTION PLATFORM Mobile Digitally Enabled Shopping Cart1 2 59
    • POINTS LISTS COUPONS ACCOUNT Delete lists Share Share Peers Select & ok Notifications Notifications Notifications Browse lists View Loyalty Points Saved coupons Shopping history Create lists Browse targets Browse Credit/Debit Cards Add items Set targets Add to shopping list Browse Save Dislike Browse friends Browse friends Browse friends Delete items Delete targets Share Add to lists Target one Accept Accept Accept Warranty data Accept Add to lists View target progress Add to shopping list View by year Received Points Received Points/Coupons Warranty Expiry Delete from lists Target two Decline Decline Decline Related products Decline Delete from lists Delete from lists Delete Target achieved Target achieved Friend requests Set priority Browse points View points Set points & share Enter points & ok Browse Recommendations Browse Recommendations Browse Peers Delete Peers Edit/Delete card Set password & ok Select & add Search Peers Enter password Enter details Select Monthly spending Spending breakup Browse Add card Product data Browse Products MOBILE APP FEATURE SET 60
    • AM9:09BELL 100% Coupons $ Points AccountLists sears AM9:09BELL 100% Coupons $ Points AccountLists sears AM9:09BELL 100% Coupons $ Points AccountLists sears MOBILE APPLICATION SCREENS: 2 3 1 Cust ID : 678678678 Cust ID : 678678678 Cust ID : 678678678 61
    • SHOPPING LISTS: Creating shopping lists helps the consumer to receive offers or deals based on their lists which serves as a motivator. It also helps in finding the products in the store. For the retailers shopping lists become a window into the mind of the shopper and helps in delivering a personalised experience. Lists also helps the retailer to engage the consumer when he checks into the store through the digitally enabled shopping cart. 62
    • AM9:09BELL 100% Coffee Powder Eggs Wheat Flour Biscuits Washing Detergent Tissues Butter Jam Bread LISTS Monthly Weekly Offer 1 Description of the offer Offer 1 Description of the offer Add to list Offer 1 Description of the offer Add to list Offer 1 Description of the offer Add to list Recommendations 4 Add to list Birthday party Cheese Coffee Powder Eggs Wheat Flour Biscuits Washing Detergent Tissues Butter Jam Bread AM9:09BELL 100% LISTS Monthly Weekly Delete List Birthday party Recommendations 4 New List Cheese Coffee Powder Eggs Biscuits Washing Detergent Tissues Butter Jam Bread AM9:09BELL 100% LISTS Monthly Weekly Delete List Wheat Flour Birthday party Recommendations 4 New List 63
    • POINTS: Explore Targets POINTS Account Total Points you have is 2 6 0 9 540 points away from target one 1130 points away from target two Share points Remove Remove Flat 40% off 3149 points 3739 points Target 1 40% Off on December’s grocery purchase Target 2 2 AM9:09BELL 100% Points You can receive and share points with your loved ones to achieve your long term shopping offers sears AM9:09BELL 100% Kerry has sent you 339 points :) DeclineAccept DeclineAccept Martha has sent you 63 points :) POINTS Account Total Points you have is 2 6 0 540 points away from target one 1130 points away from target two Share points Remove Flat 40% off 3149 points Target 1 40% off on December’s Points & Target alerts: When peers send points or the user reached loyalty targets. The app lets consumers set definite goals to achieve using loyalty points - The app brings loyalty much closer to the consumer by clearly displaying the current status of their loyalty accounts. By let ting the users set their own targets it makes them committed to the retailer. It also encourages every one in a household to go to the same retailer by letting them share their loyalty points with their household members and also peers. 64
    • AM9:09BELL 100% POINTS Account Explore Targets Flat 40% off 3149 points 3739 points Product 1 40% Off on December’s grocery purchase Product 2 Flat 50% off 3179 points 8709 points Product 3 59% off on December’s grocery purchase Product 4 Target this Target this Target this Target this AM9:09BELL 100% POINTS Account Share points You have 2609 points Martha Share points John Maria Share points Share points Share points Kerry AM9:09BELL 100% POINTS Account Share points You have 2609 points 2 5 1 _ Don’t Share Maria Share The app lets consumers share their loyalty points with in the household or with their peers making it social activity 65
    • COUPONS: Coupons You can receive and share coupons with your peers using this app. sears AM9:09BELL 100% Kerry has sent you a coupon :) DeclineSave $ 20% off on $ 200 purchase Le Vernis Coupon Explore Coupons COUPONS Account Total Coupons you saved is 1 0 Flat 40% off Coupon 1 Add to shopping list Delete Explore Coupons COUPONS Account Total Coupons you saved is 1 0 Flat 40% off Coupon 1 Add to shopping list Delete Add to shopping list Delete Coupon two 40% off on December’s grocery purchase 1 - building relations. Coupon alerts: When a peer sends a coupon Saved Coupons The app lets the users save coupons which are generated by retailer depending on the consumers buying behaviours and interests. The retailer also generated coupons which the users can share with their friends whom they think would use a par ticular coupon there by making it a social activity and a way of 66
    • AM9:09BELL 100% COUPONS Account Flat 40% off Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share Flat 50% off Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share 59% off on December’s grocery purchase Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share COUPONS Account Explore Coupons Flat 40% off Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share Flat 50% off Coupon 2 Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share 59% off on December’s grocery purchase Add to shopping list Remove. I Don’t like Save Share AM9:09BELL 100% CancelOk Martha Maria John Kerry Explore Coupons Share Coupons with peers 67
    • ACCOUNT SETTINGS: Account Your Warranty cards, payment cards, shopping history & peers..all at one place. sears AM9:09BELL 100% Your microwave owen product warranty expires in 7 days Renew Warranty ACCOUNT ent Cards History 2012 January February April May July August October November $210 $180 $221 $153 $260 Hide Kerry has sent you a friend request DeclineAccept Remind me later AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT ent Cards History Peers 2012 January February March April May June July August September October November December $210 $153 $180 $221 $153 $260 2 shopping history. Warranty expiry alerts & friend requests Shopping history The app removes the hassle of swiping loyalty cards by letting the consumers register their debit/credit cards as their loyalty card, so, every time they use their payment cards with the retailer their loyalty points are automatically credited to their accounts. It also store important product data like warranty & 68
    • AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT ent Cards History Peers 2012 January February March April May June July August September October November December $210 $153 $180 $221 $153 $260 18th Jan, 2012 27th Jan, 2012 08th Jan, 2012 $120 $60 $30 AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT History Peers Product Data Add Peers You have 4 peers Martha Remove John Remove Maria Remove Kerry Remove AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT History Peers Product Data Add Peers Search Martha John Maria Add Add Add Add Kerry Peer management 69
    • AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT History Payment Cards Payment Cards Product Da You have registered 3 cards Card 1 Card 2 Card 3 Add Cards Settings Settings Settings ACCOUNT History Payment Cards Product Da You have registered 3 cards Card 1 Card 2 Card 3 Add Cards Settings Settings Settings AM9:09BELL 100% Card 3 Settings Enter Password here to make any changes CancelDone ACCOUNT SETTINGS: Payment card integration facility to loyalty account 70
    • ACCOUNT History Payment Cards Product Da You have registered 3 cards Card 1 Card 2 Card 3 Add Cards Settings Settings Settings Card 2 Card 3 Settings Settings AM9:09BELL 100% Card 2 Card 3 Settings Settings Delete this card**** **** ***** **** 1234 03/2019 123 CancelDone AM9:09BELL 100% ACCOUNT History Peers Product Data Add Cards **** **** ***** **** 1234 Set card came Set Password Re-enter Password 03/2019 123 71
    • DIGITALLY ENABLED SHOPPING CART The main activities that the solution support is: 1 In-store navigation to help customers reach their products. 2 Making sure that the customer doesn’t miss any product that is on his list. 3 Cross sell & Up-sell The digital screen fixed to the cart can be a perfect tool for the retailer to do targeted advertising. The digital screen can also pull triggers which would help in cross selling and upselling and at the same time let the consumer accomplish his in-store goals and tasks. The digital screen works better than a mobile be cause it is very task oriented and has a larger screen estate. And it is also tough to use the mobile for the above mentioned in-store tasks and also push or pull the use. The digital cart also solves these problems and makes the experience seamless. 72
    • Welcome to the Sears Store. This smart shopping assistant helps us serve you better. Please enter you Customer ID or One-time password (OTP) to check-in: Check In - Check-in Screen. By checking in the consumer can load his shopping lists prepared through his mobile device or the website. Consumer can check-in through his customer ID or a OTP. Customer ID is displayed on his mobile applica tion home screen for reference. SHOPPING CART TABLET SCREEN 1/3 73
    • SHOPPING CART TABLET SCREEN 2/3 Hello Martha. Welcome to the Sears Store. This smart shopping assistant helps us serve you better. Please select your shopping list from your account: Monthly Weekly Birthday Party ID : 678678678 Check Out Select Select Select - Shopping lists Screen. Once the customer checks in, he gets a personal ised welcome message on the screen. He can browse through shopping lists present on his account with the retailer & choose the one which he wishes to use on that trip to the store. 74
    • SHOPPING CART TABLET SCREEN 3/3 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1920 21 22 11 YOU Hello Martha. We have offers exclusively for you based on your shopping list And, You have applied coupons to your current list Congratulations ! You just received 40 points. 1 Grab Dismiss DismissGet 5% on purchase of Colgate tooth paste Buy 1 get 1 free on Surf Detergent Powder Dismiss Cust ID : 678678678 Grab Grab Log Out 11. Lime 12. Spinach 13. Potato 14.Tomato 15. Beans 16. Cucumber 17. Shampoo 18. Soap 19. Detergent Soap 20. Detergent Powder 21. Toilet Paper 22. Shower gel Fresh Produce Toiletries Canned food Dairy Cereals Bread/Bakery Beverages Pet 2 1 1 6 4 - Main activity Screen Once the customer selects the list items on the list are grouped as per their categories and their in-store po- sitioning and projected on the store plan on the screen. The position of the cart and the user is also shown rela- tive to the product placement using wi-fi triangulation. This helps the user in not missing items on the list and also makes his shopping process quick. The cart also displays the coupons or offers for that visit. Depending on the location of the cart offers and ads are pushed to the consumer. To ensure a fair & hassle free check out in-store offers are directly synced with customers ac- count & payment cards. Items on list group as per categories or in-store location Personalised offers & targeted ads board Coupons & offers applied to shopping list at the time of preparation In-store maps showing products & offers as peruser location 75
    • CONCLUSION - Through the project a model for enhancing customers experience, and there by increasing engagement with the brand has been developed. From the clients perspective, since this is just the first stage of development there is a significant way forward in scaling up the model across various retail categories.
    • Bibliography 77 Questionnaire Phil H. Goddard, Sean McLeary, “Five Dimen- sions of User Experience, Balancing business and user experience perspectives to create successful e-commerce sites,” Human Factors International MorganJennings, “Theory and models for creat- ing engaging and immersive e-commerce sites,” Human Factors International Jerome Nadel, “Digital User Experience Strate- gies,” Human Factors International, Inc. March 2009 Herb Sorensen, “Inside the Mind of the Shop- per: The Science of Retailing” Dr. S. Ghosal, “Application of Cognitive Ergo- nomics & Industrial Design in Interface Design and Product Development” Jakob Nielsen, “Usability Engineering” “Redifining Experience: Transforming global business through connected thinking,” SapientNitro Dr. Eric Schaffer, “Beyond Usability Designing for Persuasion, Emotion, and Trust,” Human Factors International, Inc. September 25, 2008 FENKO, Anna, SCHIFFERSTEIN, Hendrik N.J. and HEKKERT, Paul “Which senses dominate at different stages of product experience?,” Design Research Society Conference 2008, Sheffield Hal- lam University BJ Fogg, “A Behavior Model for Persuasive Design,” Persuasive Technology Lab, Stanford University “The Role of Digital In the Large Appliance Shopper Path to Purchase,” Google/Compete U.S., May, 2012 “Mobile In-Store Research: How in-store shop- pers are using mobile devices,” Google, Shopper Marketing Council, April 2012 “The New Multi-screen World: Understanding Cross-platform Consumer Behavior,” Google Survey, August, 2012 Amber Krishan, “Mobile Phone: A Persuasion Channel?,” Human Factors International Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi,, “Finding Flow: The Psychology of Engagement with Everyday Life ” “2013 Shopping Experience Study,” RIS Reatail Info News Systems, Congnizant Retail practice Digitalsignagetoday.com Retailcustomerexperience.com “25 Customer stories” http://www.salesforce- marketingcloud.com/blog/category/social-media/
    • Appendix78 What are your Most Difficult Tasks to accomplish “in a groccery store?” Please Mark them In Chronological Order of "Least difficult - Most Difficult" How frequently have you faced a problem in finding (or) locating an item “in a store?” Example : Searching in the aisles or sections for a specific item. Rate on a scale of 5. How do you prepare shopping Lists? What hinders your decision making while buying products/goods? Example : I recently had a confusion deciding between a Canon 60D & Canon 7D camera. When do you experience such confusion? How often do you shop for "Clothes/Apparel"? Finding a Specific Product Searching for Product Information Comparing Products Figuring out how to Use a product after purchase Bi-Weekly Write on a paper On a PC/Laptop Mobile App SMS Drafts Mental Lists (I don’t prepare lists. I Remember them) Unplanned/RandomMonthly Infrequent Very frequent Special Occasions When you feel your collection is outdated When some one recommends Other? Please mention below Least Difficult More Difficult Difficult Most Difficult 1 2 3 4 5 Other? Please mention below This is a Survey aimed at understanding Shopper needs & aspirations for creating better Shopping Experiences. All data collected would purely be used for academic purposes. Important : You can select multiple options for a question if you feel they are applicable. Name: Location: Gender: Age: How often do you shop for "Perishable Goods" (Fruits, Vegetables etc) Where do you buy "Perishable Goods" (Fruits, Vegetables etc) 15-20 Local Convinience Store Supermarket Other Places? Please mention below Male Female 21-30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61-80 Where do you buy " Non- Perishable Goods" (Rice, Oil, Ketchup etc) How often do you shop for "Non-Perishable Goods" (Rice, Oil, Ketchup etc) Local Convinience Store Daily Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly As on Demand Supermarket Other Places? Please mention below Daily Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly As on Demand Other? Please mention below Other? Please mention below Shopper Survey by Shashidhar Mangu PG, Design for Retail Experience Questionnaire
    • Please mention on what criteria would you decide to buy "Any Product of your Desire or Need" Hint: Like John would buy a personal Computer for 3D rendering & HD Gaming What is your Favorite Shop/Store/Mall & Why? At some point, for once at least you would have enjoyed your product purchase experience in a store. Can you explain what made the experience so Special. Please make sure you have answered all or most of the Questions. I sincerely appreciate you for spending your valuable time. It would be of great help in my academic research. Thanks a lot. :) What you think influences your buying decisions while shopping for “Electronic goods.” What is that you think would help you make better decisions. Please Rate each of the parameters below on a scale of 9. What are the different research tools you use before finalizing to buy an Electronic product. What Kind of a Grocery Shopper you think you are? Stock-Up Shopper [buy large amount of items at once] Fill-in shopper [buy when you sense the stock running out ] Other? Please mention below Other? Please mention below Trip Shopper [to get a few items] Peer Reviews Promotions/Offers Green Product Ratings Clear Information about the abilities of a product. Example: How a Canon 7D Camera is better than Canon 60D in terms of its technical abilities Expert Reviews Online User Reviews Specif Needs Not Bothered about Specific Needs Peer Suggestions On what criteria would you decide which "Personal Computer" to buy? Hint : My friend John would buy one which would supports his needs, like "3D rendering Softwares & HD Gaming." Least Influential Most Influential 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Its ok. It Doesn’t really matter Least Influential Most Influential 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Its ok. It Doesn’t really matter Least Influential Most Influential 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Its ok. It Doesn’t really matter Least Influential Most Influential 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Its ok. It Doesn’t really matter