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Generational Diversity in the Workplace
 

Generational Diversity in the Workplace

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This presentation was a collaboration with a Millennial given to the Library Services group at University of Detroit Mercy

This presentation was a collaboration with a Millennial given to the Library Services group at University of Detroit Mercy

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    Generational Diversity in the Workplace Generational Diversity in the Workplace Presentation Transcript

    • GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE SOPHIA GUEVARA AND SHARON TUBAY University of Detroit Mercy | 8.21.09 The Matures, Boomers, Generation X and Y
    • Learning Objectives
      • Identify the four generations
      • Share background, values, and preferences of each generation, as well as their stereotypes
      • Tips and tools
    • What is Diversity?
    • Diversity
      • " Diversity is generally defined as acknowledging, understanding, accepting, valuing, and celebrating differences among people with respect to age, class, ethnicity, gender, physical and mental ability, race, sexual orientation, spiritual practice, and public assistance status” (Esty, et al., 1995).
      • Diversity improves the ability of an organization to innovate.
      • University of Florida IFAS Extension. “Diversity in the Workplace: Benefits, Challenges, and the Required Managerial Tools” Retrieved August 16, 2009 from: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HR022
    • Generational Diversity
      • The Matures, Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y (Millennials)
      • The unique backgrounds and experiences of today’s information workforce leads to a unique blend of:
        • Motivations and expectations
          • Work/life balance, feedback, promotion
        • Communication and interaction methods
          • Face-to-face vs. virtual
        • Work strategies and tool employment
          • Technology
    • A Closer Look: The Matures, Boomers, X and Y
    • Confronting the Stereotype
    • Snapshot: The Matures
      • Born between 1909-1945 (varies)
        • Age 64+
      • Under 10 million ( 2005 est.)
      • Defining events: WWII and women stepping out into the workforce
      • Loyal
        • Used to clear-cut career trajectories, usually with the same company
      • Strong work ethic
      • Established networks
      • Background
      • Value to the Information Work Environment
      Smith and Clurman. Rocking the Ages: The Yankelovich Report on Generational Marketing. BLS.GOV. Labor force projections to 2012: the graying of the U.S. workforce. Retrieved online August 1, 2009 from: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2004/02/art3exc.htm
    • Understanding the Matures
      • Increasing numbers in the talent pool because of the economy
      • The Matures at work
        • Most valued/Least valued soft benefits
          • Pleasant work environment: 82%
          • Flexible hours: 46%
      Limited Interaction Among Generations in the Workplace Identified as Key Indicator of Coming Skilled Worker Crisis. May 2008. Retrieved online on August 1, 2009 from: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080527005042&newsLang=en
    • The Matures - Stereotypes
      • Poor technology skills
      • Inflexible
      • Unable or unwilling to be employed in positions with more than part-time hours
      • Unwilling or unable to utilize technology
      • Dictatorial
      • Rigid
      • The Negative Image
      • Stereotype
      Dittmann, Melissa. Generational Differences at Work. Monitor on Psychology , V. 36, No.6. Retrieved online on August 16, 2009 from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/jun05/generational.html
    • Snapshot: The Boomers
      • Born 1946-1964 (varies)
        • Ages: 45-63
      • 78.2 million (July 2005 U.S. Census Bureau est.)
      • Defining events: Advent of television and the Vietnam War
      • Service-oriented
      • A fountain of knowledge earned through years of experience
      • Willing to take responsibility
      • Background
      • Value to the Information Work Environment
      • Martin, J. “I Have Shoes Older Than You: Generational Diversity In The Library.” The Southeastern Librarian, (54)3. Pgs 4-11.
      • - US Census Bureau. “Facts for Features: Oldest Baby Boomers Turn 60.” Retrieved online on April 5, 2008 at: http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/006105.html
    • Understanding the Boomers
      • Ability to adapt has helped them gain in the workplace
      • The Boomers at work
        • Most valued/Least valued soft benefits
          • Satisfying work: 71%
          • Flexible hours: 51%
      Limited Interaction Among Generations in the Workplace Identified as Key Indicator of Coming Skilled Worker Crisis. May 2008. Retrieved online on August 1, 2009 from: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080527005042&newsLang=en
    • The Boomers - Stereotypes
      • Poor technology skills
      • Low energy
      • Self-absorbed
      • The Negative Image
      • Stereotype
      Dittmann, Melissa. Generational Differences at Work. Monitor on Psychology , V. 36, No.6. Retrieved online on August 16, 2009 from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/jun05/generational.html
    • Snapshot: Generation X
      • Born 1968-1979 (varies)
        • Ages 30-41
      • Previously known as the Post-Boomers
      • Generation X:Tales for an Accelerated Culture by Douglas Coupland
      • Results oriented
      • Little supervision needed
      • Willing to put the extra time in to get the job done
      • Background
      • Value to the Information Work Environment
      • - Thielfoldt, D. & Scheef, D. “Generation X and the Millenials: What you need to know about mentoring the new generations.” Retrieved online April 6, 2008 from:http://www.abanet.org/lpm/lpt/articles/mgt08044.html
      • Raines, C. 1997. “Beyond Generation X: A Bridge-Building Guide for Managers.” p. 11. Retrieved from Google Book Search on April 6, 2008 at: http://books.google.com/books?id=OsThLU5g8rEC&pg=PA11&lpg=PA11&dq=origination+of+generation+x+label&source=web&ots=oB7uM2N9Op&sig=dnBvI559wpL_9d_k4EzGg-ua1hE&hl=en
      • Census 2000 Ethnographic Study. Generation X Speaks Out on Civic Engagement and the Decennial Census: An Ethnographic Approach.
    • Understanding Generation X
      • Look for opportunities to advance their skills
      • Loyalty – Scandals of 80’s and 90’s
      • Generation X at work
        • Most valued/Least valued soft benefits
          • Pleasant work environment: 69%
          • Flexible hours: 48%
      Limited Interaction Among Generations in the Workplace Identified as Key Indicator of Coming Skilled Worker Crisis. May 2008. Retrieved online on August 1, 2009 from: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080527005042&newsLang=en
    • Generation X - Stereotype
      • Slacker Generation
        • “ Not particularly committed to a career”
      • Impatient
      • Too cynical/negative
      • The Negative Image
      • Stereotype
      Dittmann, Melissa. Generational Differences at Work. Monitor on Psychology , V. 36, No.6. Retrieved online on August 16, 2009 from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/jun05/generational.html
    • Snapshot: Generation Y (Millennials)
      • 73.5 million
        • Ages: Late teens to 31
      • Born between 1978-1990 (varies)
      • May also be referred to as the Digital Generation or Millennials
      • Digital Natives
        • Marc Prensky
      • Fresh eyes/energy
      • Willing to share innovative ideas with team members
      • Background
      • Value to the Information Work Environment
      • Pierce, Sarah. Generation Y Myths Debunked. Entrepreneur. June 2007. Retrieved online August 1, 2009 at: http://www.entrepreneur.com/humanresources/managingemployees/article179200.html
    • Understanding Generation Y
      • Fresh energy
      • Personal fulfillment and making a difference
      • Generation Y at work
        • Most valued/Least valued soft benefits
          • Satisfying work: 59%
          • Challenging work: 42%
      Limited Interaction Among Generations in the Workplace Identified as Key Indicator of Coming Skilled Worker Crisis. May 2008. Retrieved online on August 1, 2009 from: http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080527005042&newsLang=en
    • Generation Y - Stereotype
      • Impatient/Demanding
        • Not interested in paying dues
      • Spoiled/self-absorbed
      • Inexperience limits their ability to contribute value to the organization
      • The Negative Image
      • Stereotype
      Dittmann, Melissa. Generational Differences at Work. Monitor on Psychology , V. 36, No.6. Retrieved online on August 16, 2009 from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/jun05/generational.html
    • Working Together in the Information Workplace: Tips for Success
    • Connect with your colleagues
      • Connect with the individual, not the stereotype.
    • Understand different work habits
      • Don’t be afraid to try new methods of working and communicating
      • Members of different generations may have different work habits
        • Example: The use and expectation of technology in the everyday work environment
    • Understand Motives and Values
      • Try to put yourself in your colleague’s shoes to experience the world from a different vantage point
      • Respect the values and motives of your colleagues
      • The role and importance of constructive conflict
      • The importance of communication
    • Share what you know
      • Participate in mentoring and reverse-mentoring relationships.
      • Everyone makes an impact – choose to make yours a positive one.
    • You and the multigenerational workplace
    • Generations and preferences
      • How do you prefer to keep up on what’s happening in the news?
          • Please identify the generation that you fall into, if you are willing to.
      • Baby Boomer workers are staying in the workforce longer
      • Causes Boomers to compete with their own children
      • Results in Gen-Xers, as well as Millennials feeling threatened and trapped in jobs that offer little hope of advancement or promotion
      The Gray Ceiling
    • Understanding Gray Ceiling Factors
      • More Food for Thought
      • (from the July 28, 2009 edition of Time Magazine:)
      • The average 401(k) account value has dropped from $170,000 in 2007 to the CURRENT VALUE of $93,000
      • Only 13% of workers believe they have enough savings and assets for retirement
      • The normal retirement cycle has been disrupted
    • How do you see yourself?
      • Are you the coyote or the anvil on his back?
      • The “Apprentice to Master Paradigm” ends with Gen Xers and Millennials
      One Thing is Clear:
    • “ Isms”
      • “ Isms” include:
      • Racism
      • Sexism
      • Classism
      • Elitism
      • Ableism
      • Generational clashes in the workplace are another example of a specific diversity issue…
      • This generational lens may begin to minimalize the “isms” that have been focu s ed on for the last several decades
    • Useful Tools
    • Useful Tools
      • Understanding our own “Ladder of Inference”
      • Acknowledging our “Left-Hand Column”
      • Utilizing “Check-ins/outs” regularly
      • Making clear at the beginning of a process who the real decision maker is
      • Having courage to participate in open and honest dialogues
      • For promoting conversations, generational understanding, and relationship building within the workplace
    • Useful Tools (cont)
      • Using critical thinking tools from the Systems Thinking framework
        • “ Casual Loop Diagrams”
          • Use to work through problems with diverse, multi-generational teams
      • Engaging in feedback
      • Developing our own emotional intelligence
      • Asking the important, powerful questions to get real dialogue going
    • Conclusion
      • Shift Happens…it is happening in the larger system and continuum
      • There are rich, robust pockets of knowledge in every organization
      • So the bottom line is:
      • There is a seat at the table for everyone and for every generation.
    • Questions?