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PowerPoint Authors:
Susan Coomer Galbreath, Ph.D., CPA
Charles W. Caldwell, D.B.A., CMA
Jon A. Booker, Ph.D., CPA, CIA
Cyn...
11A-2
Key Concepts/Definitions
A transfer price is the price
charged when one segment of a
company provides goods or
servi...
11A-3
Three Primary Approaches
There are three primary
approaches to setting
transfer prices:
1. Negotiated transfer price...
11A-4
Learning Objective 5
Determine the range, if
any, within which a
negotiated transfer price
should fall.
11A-5
Negotiated Transfer Prices
A negotiated transfer price results from discussions
between the selling and buying divis...
11A-6
Grocery Storehouse – An Example
West Coast Plantations:
Naval orange harvest capactiy per month 10,000 crates
Variab...
11A-7
Grocery Storehouse – An Example
The selling division’s (West Coast Plantations) lowest acceptable
transfer price is ...
11A-8
Grocery Storehouse – An Example
If West Coast Plantations has sufficient idle capacity (3,000 crates) to
satisfy Gro...
11A-9
Grocery Storehouse – An Example
If West Coast Plantations has no idle capacity (0 crates) and must
sacrifice other c...
11A-10
Grocery Storehouse – An Example
If West Coast Plantations has some idle capacity (500 crates) and
must sacrifice ot...
11A-11
Evaluation of Negotiated Transfer
Prices
If a transfer within a company would result in
higher overall profits for ...
11A-12
Transfers at the Cost to the Selling
Division
Many companies set transfer prices at either
the variable cost or ful...
11A-13
Transfers at Market Price
A market price (i.e., the price charged for an
item on the open market) is often regarded...
11A-14
Divisional Autonomy and
Suboptimization
The principles of decentralization suggest that
companies should grant mana...
11A-15
End of Appendix 11A
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Managerial Accounting ed 15 Chapter 11A

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Transcript of "Managerial Accounting ed 15 Chapter 11A"

  1. 1. PowerPoint Authors: Susan Coomer Galbreath, Ph.D., CPA Charles W. Caldwell, D.B.A., CMA Jon A. Booker, Ph.D., CPA, CIA Cynthia J. Rooney, Ph.D., CPA Copyright © 2015 McGraw-Hill Education. All rights reserved. No reproduction or distribution without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education. Transfer Pricing Appendix 11A
  2. 2. 11A-2 Key Concepts/Definitions A transfer price is the price charged when one segment of a company provides goods or services to another segment of the company. The fundamental objective in setting transfer prices is to motivate managers to act in the best interests of the overall company.
  3. 3. 11A-3 Three Primary Approaches There are three primary approaches to setting transfer prices: 1. Negotiated transfer prices; 2. Transfers at the cost to the selling division; and 3. Transfers at market price.
  4. 4. 11A-4 Learning Objective 5 Determine the range, if any, within which a negotiated transfer price should fall.
  5. 5. 11A-5 Negotiated Transfer Prices A negotiated transfer price results from discussions between the selling and buying divisions. Advantages of negotiated transfer prices: 1. They preserve the autonomy of the divisions, which is consistent with the spirit of decentralization. 2. The managers negotiating the transfer price are likely to have much better information about the potential costs and benefits of the transfer than others in the company. Upper limit is determined by the buying division. Lower limit is determined by the selling division. Range of Acceptable Transfer Prices
  6. 6. 11A-6 Grocery Storehouse – An Example West Coast Plantations: Naval orange harvest capactiy per month 10,000 crates Variable cost per crate of naval oranges 10$ per crate Fixed costs per month 100,000$ Selling price of navel oranges on the outside market 25$ per crate Grocery Mart: Purchase price of current naval oranges 20$ per crate Monthly sales of naval oranges 1,000 crates Assume the information as shown with respect to West Coast Plantations and Grocery Mart (both companies are owned by Grocery Storehouse).
  7. 7. 11A-7 Grocery Storehouse – An Example The selling division’s (West Coast Plantations) lowest acceptable transfer price is calculated as: Variable cost Total contribution margin on lost sales per unit Number of units transferred Transfer Price ≥ + Transfer Price ≤ Cost of buying from outside supplier The buying division’s (Grocery Mart) highest acceptable transfer price is calculated as: Let’s calculate the lowest and highest acceptable transfer prices under three scenarios. Transfer Price ≤ Profit to be earned per unit sold (not including the transfer price) If an outside supplier does not exist, the highest acceptable transfer price is calculated as:
  8. 8. 11A-8 Grocery Storehouse – An Example If West Coast Plantations has sufficient idle capacity (3,000 crates) to satisfy Grocery Mart’s demands (1,000 crates), without sacrificing sales to other customers, then the lowest and highest possible transfer prices are computed as follows: -$ 1,000 = 10$Transfer Price ≥ +10$ Selling division’s lowest possible transfer price: Transfer Price ≤ Cost of buying from outside supplier = 20$ Buying division’s highest possible transfer price: Therefore, the range of acceptable transfer prices is $10 – $20.
  9. 9. 11A-9 Grocery Storehouse – An Example If West Coast Plantations has no idle capacity (0 crates) and must sacrifice other customer orders (1,000 crates) to meet Grocery Mart’s demands (1,000 crates), then the lowest and highest possible transfer prices are computed as follows: ( $25 - $10) × 1,000 1,000 = 25$Transfer Price ≥ +10$ Selling division’s lowest possible transfer price: Transfer Price ≤ Cost of buying from outside supplier = 20$ Buying division’s highest possible transfer price: Therefore, there is no range of acceptable transfer prices.
  10. 10. 11A-10 Grocery Storehouse – An Example If West Coast Plantations has some idle capacity (500 crates) and must sacrifice other customer orders (500 crates) to meet Grocery Mart’s demands (1,000 crates), then the lowest and highest possible transfer prices are computed as follows: Transfer Price ≤ Cost of buying from outside supplier = 20$ Buying division’s highest possible transfer price: Therefore, the range of acceptable transfer prices is $17.50 – $20.00. Selling division’s lowest possible transfer price: ( $25 - $10) × 500 1,000 = 17.50$Transfer Price ≥ +10$
  11. 11. 11A-11 Evaluation of Negotiated Transfer Prices If a transfer within a company would result in higher overall profits for the company, there is always a range of transfer prices within which both the selling and buying divisions would have higher profits if they agree to the transfer. If managers are pitted against each other rather than against their past performance or reasonable benchmarks, a noncooperative atmosphere is almost guaranteed. Given the disputes that often accompany the negotiation process, most companies rely on some other means of setting transfer prices.
  12. 12. 11A-12 Transfers at the Cost to the Selling Division Many companies set transfer prices at either the variable cost or full (absorption) cost incurred by the selling division. Drawbacks of this approach include: 1. Using full cost as a transfer price can lead to suboptimization. 2. The selling division will never show a profit on any internal transfer. 3. Cost-based transfer prices do not provide incentives to control costs.
  13. 13. 11A-13 Transfers at Market Price A market price (i.e., the price charged for an item on the open market) is often regarded as the best approach to the transfer pricing problem. 1. A market price approach works best when the product or service is sold in its present form to outside customers and the selling division has no idle capacity. 2. A market price approach does not work well when the selling division has idle capacity.
  14. 14. 11A-14 Divisional Autonomy and Suboptimization The principles of decentralization suggest that companies should grant managers autonomy to set transfer prices and to decide whether to sell internally or externally, even if this may occasionally result in suboptimal decisions. This way top management allows subordinates to control their own destiny.
  15. 15. 11A-15 End of Appendix 11A
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