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Chapter 03 lecture
 

Chapter 03 lecture

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  • Chapter 3: The Financial Reporting Process The chapter is divided into 4 parts. Part A gives a brief overview of accrual-basis accounting. Part B describes the measurement process. Part C specifies the reporting process. Part D throws light on the closing process. Lets start with Part A.
  • Part A: Gives a brief overview of accrual-basis accounting.
  • Net income is an essential aspect of good investment decisions. Proper computation of net income requires considerable attention to be paid to the proper measurement of the two primary components of net income – revenues and expenses. If accounting information is to be useful in making decisions, accountants must measure and report revenues and expenses in a way that clearly reflects the ability of the company to create value for its owners, the stockholders. To do this, we use accrual-basis accounting, where we record revenues when we earn them (the revenue recognition principle) and expenses with related revenues (the matching principle). We discuss these principles next.
  • The revenue recognition principle states that we should recognize revenue in the period in which we earn it, not necessarily in the period in which we receive cash. This principle is explained with an example. Calvin books a cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines, the world’s largest cruise line. He makes reservations and pays for the cruise in November 2012, but the cruise is not scheduled to sail until April 2013. When does Carnival report revenue from the ticket sale?
  • You may think that the revenue should be recognized in November 2012 since the cash from the sale of tickets is received then. But that is not true. Carnival cannot recognize revenue in November 2012 as it has not substantially fulfilled its obligation to Calvin. It can recognize revenue only in April 2013, because it is in April 2013 that the cruise occurs. Thus it is evident that when the cash is received in advance of services, revenue should be recognized on the date of performance of service rather than the date of receipt of cash. Now arises the question, when should the revenue be recognized when the services are performed first and the cash is received sometime in the future? Lets look at an example.
  • Suppose that, anticipating the cruise, Calvin buys a Jimmy Buffet CD from Best Buy. Rather than paying cash, Calvin uses his Best Buy card to buy the CD on account. When does Best Buy recognize revenue?
  • Best Buy records the revenue at the time it sells the CD, even though Best Buy doesn’t receive cash immediately from Calvin. Thus irrespective of when the cash is received, revenue should be recognized when the sale takes place or the services are performed.
  • There is a cause-and-effect relationship between revenue and expense recognition implicit in this principle. In a given period, we report revenue as it’s earned, according to the revenue recognition principle. It’s logical, then, that in the same period we should also record all expenses incurred to generate that revenue. The result is a measure – net income – that matches current period accomplishments (revenues) and sacrifices (expenses). That’s the matching principle.
  • Considering the previous example about Carnival Cruise Lines, the cost of generating revenue in April (ship supplies, the fuel used, and crew members’ salaries) should be expensed in April even though the cash flows occur in March, April, and May. The matching principle states that we recognize expenses in the same period as the revenues they help to generate. Expenses include those directly and indirectly related to producing revenues.
  • Under accrual-basis accounting, we record revenue and expense transactions at the time the earnings-related activities occur . Under cash-basis accounting, we record revenues at the time we receive cash and expenses at the time we pay cash . Cash Basis accounting is not a part of GAAP. Cash-basis accounting is not allowed for financial-reporting purposes.
  • The slide demonstrates the timing difference between accrual-basis and cash-basis accounting in recognizing revenue.  
  • The slide demonstrates the timing difference between accrual-basis and cash-basis accounting in recognizing expenses.  
  • Part B: Describes the measurement process.
  • The accounting cycle starts with recording of external transactions. We discussed external transactions in chapter 2. In this chapter, we complete the accounting cycle by recording adjusting entries (internal transactions), preparing financial statements, and recording closing entries.
  • Adjusting entries are a necessary part of accrual-basis accounting. We use adjusting entries t o record events that have occurred but which have not been recorded. They help to record revenues in the period earned and expenses in the period they are incurred in the generation of those revenues. Another benefit is that by properly recording revenues and expenses, we correctly state assets and liabilities.
  • It is useful to group adjusting entries into the following four categories: Prepayments: Prepaid expenses—we paid cash (or had an obligation to pay cash) for the purchase of an asset before we incurred the expense. Unearned revenues—we received cash and recorded a liability before we earned the revenue. Accruals: Accrued expenses—we paid cash after we incurred the expense and recorded a liability. Accrued revenues—we received cash after we earned the revenue and recorded an asset.
  • Prepaid expenses are costs of assets acquired in one period that will be expensed in a future period. Few examples are Purchase of equipment or supplies , Payment of rent in advance, Payment of insurance in advance. The adjusting entry for a prepaid expense always includes a debit to an expense account (increase an expense) and a credit to an asset account (decrease an asset).
  • The balance in prepaid rent account on Jan.1 is $6,000. The rent expense for the month of January is $500. As such the balance in prepaid rent account is reduced to $5,500 on Jan. 31.
  • The adjusting entry is recorded on Jan. 31, debiting the rent expense account and crediting the prepaid rent account. Notice that the adjusting entry includes a $500 expense (+E), which reduces net income and stockholders’ equity (−SE). At the same time, the balance in the asset account, prepaid rent, decreases (−A) by $500 and now has a balance of $5,500 (= $6,000 − $500).
  • Unearned revenues occur when a company receives cash in advance from a customer for products or services to be provided in the future. The adjusting entry for an unearned revenue always includes a debit to a liability account (decrease a liability) and a credit to a revenue account (increase a revenue).
  • $600 is received in advance from customers who will be given services (that is golf training in this case) in the future. Service worth $60 is provided to the customers during the month. Unearned training revenue equals $540 as of Jan. 31.
  • The adjusting entry is recorded on Jan. 31, debiting unearned revenue and crediting Service revenue account. Notice that the adjusting entry includes a $60 revenue (+R), which increases net income and stockholders’ equity (+SE). At the same time, the balance in the liability account, unearned revenues, decreases (−L) by $60 and now has a balance of $540 ( $600 - $60).
  • When a company has incurred an expense but hasn’t yet paid cash or recorded an obligation to pay, it still should record the expense. This is referred to as an accrued expense. A few examples are accrued salaries, accrued interest, accrued utility costs. The adjusting entry for an accrued expense always includes a debit to an expense account (increase an expense) and a credit to a liability account (increase a liability).  
  • At the end of January, Eagle receives a utility bill for $960 associated with operations in January. Eagle plans to pay the bill on February 6. Even though it won’t pay the cash until February, Eagle must record the utility costs for January as an expense in January.
  • The utilities expense owed on Jan. 31 will be paid on Feb.6. However, the accrued utilities expense should be recorded in the books while preparing the financial statements for the month of January.
  • An adjusting entry is recorded on Jan. 31 debiting the utilities expense and crediting utilities payable account. The adjusting entry increases liability ( utilities payable) by $960. It also increases expenses by $960. As a result there will be decrease in net income and stockholders equity by $960.
  • When a company has earned revenue but hasn’t yet received cash or recorded an amount receivable, it still should record the revenue. This is referred to as an accrued revenue. A few examples include interest receivable, accounts receivable. The adjusting entry for an accrued revenue always includes a debit to an asset account (increase an asset) and a credit to a revenue account (increase a revenue).
  • Suppose, Eagle provides $200 of golf training to customers from January 28 to January 31. However, it usually takes Eagle one week to mail bills to customers and another week for customers to pay. Therefore, Eagle expects to receive cash from these customers during February 8-14. Irrespective of when cash will be received, the revenue should be recognized in January.
  • The revenue earned during the last week of January and hence receivable on Jan. 31 is $200. Though the collection is expected to be made sometime in February, the income should be recognized in January.
  • An adjusting entry will be recorded on Jan. 31 debiting accounts receivable and crediting training revenue. The adjusting entry would result in an increase in assets, accounts receivable, and in revenues and stockholders’ equity.
  • To complete the measurement process, we need to update balances of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses for adjusting entries. An adjusted trial balance is then prepared with updated balances. An adjusted trial balance is a list of all accounts and their balances at a particular date after we have updated account balances for adjusting entries.
  • The slide provides the trial balance of Eagle Golf Academy both before and after adjustments. Analyse, how the balances of different accounts have been changed after making the adjustments for an increase or decrease in account balances (shown in red in second column).
  • Part C: Specifies the reporting process.
  • Once the adjusted trial balance is complete, we prepare financial statements. Revenue and expense accounts are reported in the income statement. The difference between total revenues and total expenses equals net income. All asset, liability, and stockholders’ equity accounts are reported in the balance sheet which confirms the equality of the basic accounting equation.  
  • The income statement demonstrates that Eagle Golf Academy earned a profit of $500 in the month of January. The revenues earned from providing service to customers exceed the costs of providing that service.
  • The statement of stockholders’ equity summarizes the changes in each stockholders’ equity account as well as in total stockholders’ equity and the accounting value of the company to stockholders (owners). It also reflects the retained earnings of the company. Retained earnings has three components: revenues, expenses, and dividends. In the adjusted trial balance, the balance of the retained earnings account equals its balance before all revenue, expense, and dividend transactions, which is the balance of retained earnings at the beginning of the accounting period. For Eagle Golf Academy, the beginning balance of retained earnings equals $0 since this is the first month of operations. Total stockholders’ equity increases from $0 at the beginning of January to $25,300 by the end of January. The increase occurs as a result of a $25,000 investment by the owners (stockholders) when they bought common stock plus an increase of $300 when the company earned a profit of $500 on behalf of its stockholders and after distributing $200 of dividends, retained $300 in the business.
  • The balance sheet includes all asset, liability, and permanent stockholders’ equity accounts. We can separate assets into those that provide a benefit over the next year (current assets) and those that provide a benefit for more than one year (long-term assets). Similarly, we can divide liabilities into those due over the next year (current liabilities) and those due in more than one year (long-term liabilities).
  • Part D: Throws light on the closing process.
  • The closing process will have the following effects: 1) Transfer of balance of all revenue, expense, and dividend accounts to the balance of retained earnings. 2) Increase in retained earnings account by the amount of revenues and decrease in retained earnings by the amount of expenses and dividends. 3) The balance of each revenue, expense, and dividend account will be reduced to zero. 4) Closing entries do not affect the balances of permanent accounts other than retained earnings.
  • The ending balance of retained earnings now includes all transactions affecting the components of the account. The ending balance of $300 represents all revenues and expenses over the life of the company (just the first month of operations in this example) less dividends. The ending balance of retained earnings in January will be its beginning balance in February. Then we’ll close February’s revenues, expenses, and dividends to retained earnings, and this cycle will continue each period
  • The first and foremost step in closing process is to post, closing entries that transfer the balances of all temporary accounts (revenues, expenses, and dividends) to the balance of the retained earnings account. After we post the closing entries to the ledger accounts, we can prepare a post-closing trial balance. The post-closing trial balance is a list of all accounts and their balances at a particular date after we have updated account balances for closing entries . Notice that the post-closing trial balance does not include any revenues, expenses, or dividends, because these accounts all have zero balances after closing entries. The balance of retained earnings has been updated from the adjusted trial balance to include all revenues, expenses, and dividends for the period.
  • End of Chapter 3

Chapter 03 lecture Chapter 03 lecture Presentation Transcript

  • Chapter 03 The Financial Reporting Process McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2011 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Part A Accrual-Basis Accounting 3-
  • LO1 Revenue and Expense Reporting
    • Accounting information – necessary for decision making.
    • To be useful in decision making – accountants must report revenues and expenses in a way that reflects the ability of the company to create value for its owners.
    • Accrual-basis accounting records revenues when earned (the revenue recognition principle) and expenses with related revenues (the matching principle).
  • Revenue Recognition Principle
    • Recognize revenue when it is earned
    • Calvin books a cruise with Carnival Cruise Lines, the world’s largest cruise line. He makes reservations and pays for the cruise in November 2012, but the cruise is not scheduled to sail until April 2013.
    • When does Carnival report revenue from the ticket sale?
  • Revenue Recognition Principle
    • In November 2012???
    • No.
    • Because it has not substantially fulfilled its obligation to Calvin.
    • In April 2013???
    • Yes.
    • Because it is in April 2013 that the cruise occurs.
  • Revenue Recognition Principle
    • Suppose that, anticipating the cruise, Calvin buys a Jimmy Buffet CD from Best Buy.
    • Rather than paying cash, Calvin uses his Best Buy card to buy the CD on account.
    • When does Best Buy recognize revenue?
    3-
  • Revenue Recognition Principle 3- Even though Best Buy doesn’t receive cash immediately from Calvin, it still records the revenue at the time it sells the CD.
  • Matching Principle
    • Expenses are reported with the revenues they
    • help to generate
    3-
  •  
  • LO2 Accrual–Basis Compared with Cash–Basis Accounting
  • Accrual–Basis Compared with Cash–Basis Accounting
  • Accrual–Basis Compared with Cash–Basis Accounting
  • Part B The Measurement Process
  • LO3 Adjusting Entries 3- Closing Process Reporting Process
  • Purpose of Adjusting Entries
    • To record events that have occurred but which have not been recorded.
    • To record revenues in the period earned.
    • To record expenses in the period they are incurred in the generation of those revenues.
    • To correctly state assets and liabilities in the balance sheet.
    3-
  • Grouping Adjusting Entries
    • Prepayments:
    • Prepaid expenses – we paid cash (or had an obligation to pay cash) for the purchase of an asset before we incurred the expense.
    • Unearned revenues – we received cash and recorded a liability before we earned the revenue.
    • Accruals:
    • Accrued expenses – we paid cash after we incurred the expense and recorded a liability.
    • Accrued revenues – we received cash after we earned the revenue and recorded an asset.
    3-
  • Prepaid Expenses
    • Costs of assets acquired in one period that will be expensed in a future period.
    • Examples: Purchase of equipment or supplies, payment of rent in advance, payment of insurance in advance.
    • Adjusting Entry:
      • Debit expense account (increase an expense)
        • Credit asset account (decrease an asset)
    3-
  • Example: Prepaid Rent 3- Prepaid rent expires $500 Adjusting entry $5,500 Remaining prepaid rent Jan. 31 $6,000 Cash paid for prepaid rent Jan. 1
  • Example: Prepaid Rent 3-
  • Unearned Revenues
    • Once a company has provided products or services, they can record revenue earned and reduce the obligation to the customer. The adjusting entry for an unearned revenue always includes a debit to a liability account (decrease a liability) and a credit to a revenue account (increase a revenue).
      • Adjusting entry:
    • Debit liability account (decrease a liability)
    • Credit revenue account (increase a revenue)
    3-
  • Example: Unearned Training Revenue 3- Adjusting entry $540 Unearned revenue remains Jan. 31 $600 Cash received in advance Jan. 26 Services provided $60
  • Example: Unearned Training Revenue 3-
  • Accrued Expenses
    • When a company has incurred an expense but hasn’t yet paid cash or recorded an obligation to pay, it still should record the expense.
    • Examples: Accrued salaries, accrued interest, accrued utility costs.
    • Adjusting entry:
    • Debit expense account (increase an expense)
    • Credit liability account (increase a liability)
    3-
  • Example: Accrued Utility Costs
    • At the end of January, Eagle receives a utility bill for $960 associated with operations in January. Eagle plans to pay the bill on February 6.
    • Even though it won’t pay the cash until February, Eagle must record the utility costs for January as an expense in January.
    3-
  • Example: Accrued Utility Costs 3- Adjusting entry $960 Utilities owed Jan. 31 $960 Cash paid for utilities Feb. 6 Utilities used $960 Jan. 1
  • Example: Accrued Utility Costs 3-
  • Accrued Revenues
    • When a company has earned revenue but hasn’t yet received cash or recorded an amount receivable, it still should record the revenue. This is referred to as an accrued revenue.
    • Examples: Interest receivable, accounts receivable
    • Adjusting entry:
    • Debit asset account (increase an asset)
    • Credit revenue account (increase a revenue)
    3-
  • Example: Accounts Receivable
    • Suppose, Eagle provides $200 of golf training to customers from January 28 to January 31. However, it usually takes Eagle one week to mail bills to customers and another week for customers to pay. Therefore, Eagle expects to receive cash from these customers during February 8-14.
    • Irrespective of when cash will be received, the revenue should be recognized in January.
    3-
  • Example: Accounts Receivable 3- Adjusting entry $200 Owed from customers Jan. 31 $200 Cash received from customers Feb. 8-14 Revenues earned $200 Jan. 28
  • Example: Accounts Receivable 3-
  • LO4 Post Adjusting Entries
    • Post adjusting entries to the T-accounts in the general ledger to update the account balances.
    • Prepare an adjusted trial balance.
    • An adjusted trial balance is a list of all accounts and their balances after we have updated account balances for adjusting entries.
    3-
  • Unadjusted Trial Balance and Adjusted Trial Balance of Eagle Golf Academy 3-
  • Part C The Reporting Process
  • LO5 Financial Statements 3-
  • Income Statement 3-
  • Statement of Stockholders’ Equity 3-
  • Classified Balance Sheet Sheet January 31 3- Total assets equal current plus long-term assets. Total liabilities equal current plus long-term liabilities. Total stockholders’ equity includes common stock and retained earnings from the statement of stockholders’ equity. Total assets must equal total liabilities plus stockholders’ equity. EAGLE GOLF ACADEMY Classified Balance 300 Salaries payable 1,500 Supplies Liabilities Assets Current assets: Current liabilities: Cash $ 6,200 Accounts payable $ 2,300 Accounts receivable 2,700 Unearned revenue 540 Prepaid rent 5,500 Utilities payable 960 Total current assets 15,900 Interest payable 100 Total current liabilities 4,200 Long-term assets: Equipment 24,000 Long-term liabilities: Accum. depr., equip. (400) Notes payable 10,000 Total long-term assets 23,600 Total liabilities 14,200 Stockholders’ Equity Common stock 25,000 Retained earnings 300 Total stockholders’ equity $ 25,300 Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ 39,500 Total assets $ 39,500
  • Part D The Closing Process
  • LO6 Closing Entries
    • Transfer the balance of all revenue, expense, and dividend accounts to the balance of retained earnings.
    • Increase the retained earnings account by the amount of revenues and decrease retained earnings by the amount of expenses and dividends.
    • The balance of each revenue, expense, and dividend account equals zero after closing entries.
    • Do not affect the balances of permanent accounts other than retained earnings.
  • Close to Retained Earnings 3-
  • LO7 Post Closing Entries and Prepare Post–Closing Trial Balance 3-
  • End of Chapter 03