Supporting Abused and Neglected Children Through Early Care and Policy
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Supporting Abused and Neglected Children Through Early Care and Policy

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Title: Supporting abused and neglected children through early care and policy ...

Title: Supporting abused and neglected children through early care and policy
This webinar will make the case for supporting abused and neglected children through early care opportunities as well as describe how to use the healthycity.org site to research and identify policy solutions around foster youth and early childhood education issues.
Learning objectives:
1) Strengthen one’s understanding of populations that make up abused and neglected children
2) Learn how to identify data around abused and neglected children on healthycity.org
3) Understand policy opportunities to improve conditions for the youngest abused and neglected children

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  • Can also speak to allows engagement – allows folks to get on the same page/understanding. Speak a common language.
  • 1. Data such as demographic, health, education, and housing
  • 1. Data such as demographic, health, education, and housing
  • Reflective of statewide trends as well.
  • Initial experiences provide scaffolding for later development –
  • In California, over 33 thousand children UNDER FIVE were abused/neglected. Over 14 thousand children under five were removed into foster care in 2012.Promote safe and stable family environments for children by:Keeping families together when possiblePrioritizing reunificationPrioritizing timely resolutions
  • High need, low supply is one problem. However, there are policy solutions to improve ECE access rates for California’s abused/neglected children outside of public budget processes.
  • Is the order of the animation off? Also, you may want to make a square and highlight how you can create a free account and it only takes 5 minutes to set one up and it allows you to save lists, etc…
  • Remind folks that we will send out evaluation survey along with link to recording of webinar

Supporting Abused and Neglected Children Through Early Care and Policy Supporting Abused and Neglected Children Through Early Care and Policy Presentation Transcript

  • Supporting abused and neglected children through early care and policy November 20, 2014 10:00AM - 11:00AM Presenters Angela Vazquez Policy Analyst, Educational Equity avazquez@advanceproj.org www.Healthycity.org Facebook.com/HealthyCityCA @HealthyCityCA info@healthycity.org Jonathan Nomachi Manager of Collaborative Initiatives jnomachi@advanceproj.org www.AdvancementProjectCA.org Facebook.com/AdvancementProjectCA info@advanceproj.org
  • How to Participate Today • Open and close your Panel • View, Select, and Test your audio • Type in a question at ANY time during the webinar. We will pause throughout to respond • Everyone will receive an email within 24 hours with additional help tools and a link to a survey. Please fill out the survey with your feedback from this session
  • Question for Participants What are you hoping to get our of today’s webinar? (Type it in the question section) View slide
  • Healthy City is a program of Advancement Project is a public policy change organization rooted in the civil rights movement. We engineer large-scale systems change to remedy inequality, expand opportunity and open paths to upward mobility. Our goal is that members of all communities have the safety, opportunity and health they need to thrive. View slide
  • What We Do ONLINE MAPPING TECHNOLOGY www.HealthyCity.org DIRECT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: Strengthen community voice and Work ON-THE-GROUND action targeted to develop research/policy strategies and web tools. Increase resources in underserved communities of color COMMUNITY RESEARCH LAB Advance equitable public polices. Engages, trains, and provides tools for community groups to lead and sustain actionoriented research
  • Educational Equity • Prevent California’s most vulnerable young children, including children of color, low-income children, and more recently, children in foster care, from starting behind and staying behind. • Improve and expand high-quality early care and education (ECE) for California’s children by bringing together diverse stakeholders to build consensus for policy solutions that support the needs of children from birth to five.
  • Question for Participants What are you hoping to get our of today’s webinar? (Type it in the question section)
  • Today you will learn how to:  Strengthen one’s understanding of populations that make up abused and neglected children  Learn how to identify data around abused and neglected children on healthycity.org  Understand policy opportunities to improve conditions for the youngest abused and neglected children
  • Poverty •Healthcare •Basic necessities •Housing stability •Employment Parent Coping Skills Child Health & Socioemotional Challenges Low Parent Education Children and families can experience multiple layers of risk for abuse and neglect. •Low understanding of normal child development •Employment Risk of Abuse or Neglect • Parent Mental Health • Parent Health • Parent History of Abuse/Neglect Trauma Low Social & Concrete Support • Access to Public Services • Community connections • English Language
  • - • A majority of families known to the child welfare system have been or are also receiving CalWORKS/public assistance 60-87%, according to statewide estimates of overlapping caseloads “These kids are mostly hungry and dirty…” Erwin McEwen, Former Director of Illinois Dept. of Children & Family Services Substantiated Allegation Type Children <5 Years, Jan. 2011-Dec. 2011 Los Angeles County Sexual Abuse 2% Caretaker Absence/Incapacity 4% At Risk, Sibling Abused 10% Physical Abuse 5% Severe Neglect 5% Emotional Abuse 18% Exploitation 0% General Neglect 56%
  • Children “At-Risk” – but for what?  Developmental delays  Poor academic success  Socioemotional competencies & well-being  Negative life outcomes, including delinquency/criminal behavior, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, homelessness. This is true for children from low-income families and disadvantaged communities, generally. It is especially true of children known to child welfare agencies, given the high likelihood of overlapping and cumulative impact of known risk factors.
  • Early Care & Education Mitigates Risk and Promotes Safety & Resilience Risk Factors • Low Parent Education & Employment • Community disengagement • Poverty & Housing Stability • Child Health & Socioemotional Issues Protective Factors • Parental Resilience • Social Connections • Knowledge of Parenting & Child Development • Concrete Support in Times of Need • Social & Emotional Competence of Children
  • What makes the children under child welfare supervision a high-priority population for ECE services? Child Health & Socioemotional Challenges Poverty • • • • Healthcare Basic necessities Housing stability Employment Parent Coping Skills • Parent Mental Health • Parent Health • Parent History of Abuse/Neglect Trauma Risk of Abuse or Neglect Low Parent Education Low Social & Concrete Support • Low understanding of normal child development • Employment • Access to Public Services • Community connections
  • A life disrupted  When a child experiences abuse or neglect, they have additional traumas layered onto environmental and familial risk.  Physical or emotional wounds of abuse/neglect  Further disruption of early attachment with a caregiver  Environmental instability
  • The effects of toxic stress are most apparent in children under five known to child welfare agencies.  Five times more likely to have developmental delays  Up to 50% of children known to child welfare agencies  Basic skills beget more skills  Lack of stable, nurturing relationships with adults that enhance early learning experiences The children known to child welfare agencies are an easily identifiable population who could most benefit from early intervention and support services, such as high-quality early care and education.
  • Children in Foster Care When we talk about “atrisk” children, who are we talking about? (Usually Court-Ordered) Children in Relative Care (Court Ordered) Children In Relative Care (Voluntary) Children in Supervised Home Care (Court-Ordered) Children in Supervised Home Care (Voluntary) Children With Allegations of Abuse/Neglect Referred Out
  • Questions?
  • How to find information around at-risk children using HealthyCity.org?
  • Types of Geographies on HealthyCity.org Types of Geographies Available on HC.org Address/Intersection Consolidated Precinct Census block group Census Tract ZIP Code City Assembly District Senate District Congressional District County Region Place Based Initiatives (including The California Endowment Building Healthy Communities and First 5 Los Angeles Best Start Communities) Los Angeles (and other Counties) Area Boundaries (including Service Planning Areas, L.A. County Health Districts, and LAUSD School Attendance Boundaries, Board of Supervisors, City Council)
  • Creating Maps with HealthyCity.org: Services and Point Data Data Name Source Social Services 211s Public & Private Schools California Department of Education WIC Agencies & Vendors Network for a Healthy California Hospitals (OSHPD) OSHPD Head Start Agencies California Head Start Association Child Care Alcohol Outlet Air Quality Data Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing Division U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Environmental Protection Agency Grocery Stores Banks Check-Cashing Businesses DeLorme DeLorme DeLorme Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) •Over 2,500 variables! •Multiple years & levels available
  • Let’s look at the number of at-risk children and lack of child care spaces in San Bernardino County
  • At-risk children and child care spaces
  • At-risk children and child care spaces
  • At-risk children and child care spaces
  • WORD version of maps/charts
  • PRINT map SAVE map for future reference EMAIL/SHARE map
  • Questions?
  • Early Care and Education Rates are Low for LA’s Abused/Neglected Children  12.8% (1,509) of the LA County child protective services caseload under age five, 11,778 as of October 2011, attended public early care and education programs, including Federal Head Start/Early Head Start (484) and state subsidized child care/preschool (1,042 children). In contrast, about 20% of infants and toddlers and about 50% of 3 & 4 year-olds from LA County’s lowincome families are able to access subsidized child care and development services.
  • An example of state and federal policy misalignment… Children Receiving Protective Services or “At-Risk of Abuse & Neglect” Priority for State Subsidized Child Care & Development Services Who receives priority? Only those children living at home whom a child welfare worker or child care administrator deems “imminently atrisk” without the provision of child care/early education services. Children not “imminently at-risk” At home (Family Maintenance /Emergency Response) With family caregiver (Family Reunification & Permanent Placement/Emergency Response) In foster care/foster family home (Family Reunification & Permanent Placement) Closed case – variety of case plan histories (Permanent Placement/Family Reunification/Famil y Maintenance) • Children of pregnant/parenting teens with DCFS history
  • An example of state and federal policy misalignment… Children Receiving Protective Services or “At-Risk of Abuse & Neglect” Priority for Head Start/Early Head Start Services Who receives priority? Children with an open child welfare case residing with a foster or relative caregiver. Children not “imminently at-risk” At home (Family Maintenance /Emergency Response) With family caregiver (Family Reunification & Permanent Placement/Emergency Response) In foster care/foster family home (Family Reunification & Permanent Placement) Closed case – variety of case plan histories (Permanent Placement/Family Reunification/Family Maintenance) • Children of pregnant/parenting teens with DCFS history
  • Policy Solutions Should … Emphasize early care and education as prevention and early intervention across education and child welfare systems for children most “at-risk” for a variety of poor outcomes, especially as these resources continue to shrink for all vulnerable communities. ECE and child welfare systems must make unified efforts to serve children in contact with child welfare agencies.
  • Questions?
  • Upcoming Events FAQ Friday! Call in with questions Friday, November 22nd 11:00am-12:00pm Webinar: Using HealthyCity.org for Cultural Competent Outreach and Advocacy Wednesday, December 18th 2:00pm-4:00pm
  • Preview HealthyCity.org’s new updates! English | Español v5.healthycity.org
  • Thank You! Angela Vazquez, avazquez@advanceproj.org Jonathan Nomachi, jnomachi@advanceproj.org @EdEquityAP facebook.com/EducationalEquityAdvancementProject