Map Making 101
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Map Making 101

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Maps help communities tell stories.Maps help connect the dots between data and people within specific geographic locations. Maps can also reveal unique, place-based issues that quantitative data......

Maps help communities tell stories.Maps help connect the dots between data and people within specific geographic locations. Maps can also reveal unique, place-based issues that quantitative data alone cannot. Maps can also be repositories for community knowledge which can assist advocates, community-based organizations, policy-makers and funders to communicate community needs to a broad audience clearly, quickly and dramatically. In this webinar we will cover map making basics using HealthyCity.org.

You will also learn:

* How maps are used for research and action
* Key elements of map design and mapping methods
* Considerations and best tips for creating effective maps

More in: Education
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  • TAISHA
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  • LORI: HC.org provides these people with data and technology to support their work within and on behalf of our communities. HC.org helps encourage data-driven planning and inform policy within sectors such as Education, Public Safety, Health, Public Health, Government, etc. Some of our funders include F5, CA Endowment…
  • LORI: Can also speak to allows engagement – allows folks to get on the same page/understanding. Speak a common language.
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  • TAISHAWhat are some of the things they notice first in viewing the map?What do they see on the map?What is the information being conveyed through the map?What are the sources (of the data that the map is displaying)?What is the map’s location?
  • TAISHA: What are some of the things they notice first in viewing the map?What do they see on the map?What is the information being conveyed through the map?What are the sources (of the data that the map is displaying)?What is the map’s location?Highlight People per Open Space acre stat. The map reinforces this statistic that most of the open space in the City of LA is located outside of Koreatown. This map was used to garner funding from the City Council to preserve the little open space available in this area (instead of taking the bid of putting in another parking lot).
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  • TAISHAAnswer: They are all things that you see on a map!To tie in later with Wikimaps: What is missing from the maps we have highlighted/made thus far?Answer: Qualitative data/analysis
  • TAISHAThis slide highlights different components of the map and how they help someone reading the map to understand and use the information. Open up brief discussion by asking what are some of the things you see in this map? What can you learn about this area from this map? Points to highlight:Legend (most people familiar with)- provides the information needed to read the map; with HC maps, the legend includes how the data set was broken down (by quantile). Quantiles divide ordered data into equally sized groups. Descriptive text/statistics – can include the title or a couple of brief sentences on the side that highlight an important pattern on the map usually provides the area average (not listed here), the sum of the specific demographic in the area, and the minimum and maximum. Here, the map reader can find the specific stats within the area. Inset map- the inset map allows you to compare the focus area with what is occurring throughout the city. Is the focus area located in a part of the city where the specific demographic is high? (yes). You can compare and contrast with other parts of the city.Source data (includes city/county-wide averages and standard deviation)- citywide/county wide averages are useful in comparing to the focus area statistics. How higher/lower are the statistics in the focus area in comparison to the city or county. In this map, several block groups had 2-5 times more gang-related crimes than the city average for a block group. Explain mean and standard deviation…Areas to highlight:highest concentrationsA program manager, researcher, etc. reviewing this map can find ways (focus groups, interviews, etc.) to find out what are the on-the-ground dynamic of this center area
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Transcript

  • 1. Information + action for social change Map Making 101 Making Maps for Research and Advocacy with HealthyCity.org Lori Thompson Manager, Online & Digital Initiatives lthompson@advanceproj.org Taisha Bonilla Training & Communications Coordinator tbonilla@advanceproj.org
  • 2. How to Participate Today • Open and close your Panel • View, Select, and Test your audio • Type in a question at ANY time during the webinar. We will pause throughout to respond • Everyone will receive an email within 24 hours with additional help tools and a link to a survey. Please fill out the survey with your feedback from this session
  • 3. Healthy City is a program of Advancement Project is a public policy change organization rooted in the civil rights movement. We engineer large-scale systems change to remedy inequality, expand opportunity and open paths to upward mobility. Our goal is that members of all communities have the safety, opportunity and health they need to thrive.
  • 4. Mission Healthy City transforms how decisions are made by creating innovative tools and methods that expose and resolve structural inequities Strengthen community voice and action Purpose Communities of every race and class underserved Increase resources inhave the opportunities and resources they need to thrive communities of color Values Advance equitable public polices. Equity Community Transformation
  • 5. Who Uses HealthyCity.org? Case Manager Service Provider Grant Writer Funder HealthyCity.org Website Policy Advocate Community Organizer Researcher Fuel social change and empower communities!
  • 6. What We Do ONLINE MAPPING TECHNOLOGY www.HealthyCity.org DIRECT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: Work ON-THE-GROUND to develop targeted research/policy strategies and web tools. COMMUNITY RESEARCH LAB Engages, trains, and provides tools for community groups to lead and sustain action-oriented research
  • 7. Today you will learn… 1. How maps are being used for research and advocacy 2. Considerations and best tips for creating effective maps 3. Key elements of map design and explore different mapping methods
  • 8. How have you used maps research and advocacy? 2:24 – 4:14
  • 9. Map-Based Research
  • 10. Why are maps important in research? 1. Help reveal larger place-based dynamics (that numbers by themselves cannot) 2. Support strategy through communicating patterns to a broad audience, clearly, quickly, and dramatically 3. Connect community knowledge and data to location AT BOX: What are some other ways maps might be important in resear
  • 11. How Can Mapping Inform Community Work and Strategies? Organizations can use maps to: • Act on an issue • Strategy: Community Organizing • Strategy: Advocacy • Program planning • Strategy: Grant Writing • Strategy: Outreach and Engagement
  • 12. Strategy: Community Organizing Base-building and Mapping Community Surveys– Los Angeles, CA
  • 13. Strategy: Advocacy Public Awareness on Distribution of Healthy/ Unhealthy Food Resources – Los Angeles, CA
  • 14. Strategy: Program Planning Health Insurance Access– California
  • 15. Strategy: Grant Writing Koreatown and City of Los Angeles Park Space People Area (sq mi) People per square mile Open Space (acres) People per Open Space acre African American or Black Asian or Pacific Islander Hispanic White Other Median Household Income ($) Families in Poverty Koreatown City of Los Angeles 161,732 3,944,951 3.79 480.63 42,673.35 8,207.88 21.40 46,264.15 7,557.57 85.27 4% 9% 31% 11% 58% 50% 6% 27% 2% 3% 29,387.98 55,589.59 30% 19% Koreatown defined here as U.S. Census Block Groups whose centers are bounded by Beverly Blvd to the North, S Hoover Street to the East, W Pico Blvd to the South, and S Wilton Place to the West. Population, Ethnicity/Race, Median Household Income , and Families in Poverty data from Nielsen Claritas, Inc. 2009. Park/Open Space data from the California Protected Area Database v. 1.3. Area calculations performed with NAVTEQ 2009 shapefiles. Funding for Parks – Los Angeles, CA
  • 16. Map-Based Research Questions? ease enter your questions in the chat b
  • 17. Map Design
  • 18. Map Design What do the following have in common? • Cities, zip codes, census tracts, other geographies • Streets, Freeways, other physical features • Labels • Legend • Mile Bar and North arrow • Descriptive Text THINGS YOU SEE ON A MAP!!
  • 19. Maps 101: What You See on a Map • Titles & Descriptive Text • Legend •Zoom options •Geographies • Physical Features • Labels • Source information
  • 20. Four Keys to Creating Effective Maps • Map Design • Map Layout • Map Publishing • Map Analysis
  • 21. Creating Effective Maps Effective maps provide visuals that are: • Relevant • Easy to understand • Dramatic
  • 22. So you want to make a map!? Some guiding key considerations… What: What is your research question? What is the story you want to tell, the question you want to answer, or the issue you want to address? Who: Who is your audience? Community members? City officials? When: Are you looking at an ongoing problem or one point in time? Do you need a map with current or existing data? How: How will you present this? Report? Website? Community meeting? Public Hearing? Social Media? Why: Why should the people you will present this to care? Does your map inspire action?
  • 23. Map Making 101: An example Break your design into segments to make it organized and manageable For example: You work with a neighborhood coalition in Compton. Many of the coalition members are retired, long-time homeowners in the city. A measure on the upcoming local ballot proposes to benefit the community, but will significantly increase water costs for many of your members. They want to raise awareness through door knocking and talking to other homeowners throughout the city on this measure that might greatly impact them.
  • 24. Map Making 101: An example Research Questions: •Where do most homeowners in the City of Compton live? •Where are the registered voters? •Where should we target outreach? •What outreach has already been done?
  • 25. Map Making 101: An example Data Needed: • Owner-Occupied Housing Units • Registered voters Feasibility: • Data available publically available [on HealthyCity.org]
  • 26. Map Making 101: An example: Break your design into segments to make it organized and manageable! For example: Data: Point: Services: Organizational/Community Services: Political Organization, Participation, Legislative District Data: Demographic: Population Characteristics •Layer 1: Owner-Occupied Housing Data: Customized Data: Polling sites (XLS), Outreach events (XLS) Data: Media: Photos of Voter registration, outreach
  • 27. Let’s Design some Maps!
  • 28. Maps 101: Types of Maps on HealthyCity.org Point Maps Thematic Maps
  • 29. Maps 101: Types of Maps on HealthyCity.org Wikimaps
  • 30. English | Español
  • 31. Types of Geographies on HealthyCity.org Types of Geographies Available on HC.org Address/Intersection Consolidated Precinct Census block group Census Tract ZIP Code City Assembly District Senate District Congressional District County Region Place Based Initiatives (including The California Endowment Building Healthy Communities and First 5 Los Angeles Best Start Communities) Los Angeles (and other Counties) Area Boundaries (including Service Planning Areas, L.A. County Health Districts, and LAUSD School Attendance Boundaries, Board of Supervisors, City Council)
  • 32. Snapshot of types of Services and Point Data available on Data Name HealthyCity.org Source Social Services 211s Public & Private Schools California Department of Education WIC Agencies & Vendors Network for a Healthy California Hospitals (OSHPD) OSHPD Head Start Agencies California Head Start Association Child Care Alcohol Outlet Air Quality Data Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing Division U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Environmental Protection Agency Grocery Stores Banks Check-Cashing Businesses DeLorme DeLorme DeLorme Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) •Over 2,500 variables! •Multiple years & levels available!
  • 33. Map Making 101: Mapping Methods on HealthyCity.org (Live!) 1. Point Map 2. Thematic Map 3. Point and Thematic Map 4. Customized Wikimap
  • 34. Maps 101: Mapping Method #1 Interactive demo: Creating a “Point” or “Thematic” Map on HealthyCity.org 1. Geography 2. Service Type 3. Demographic or other theme Please enter your suggestions in the chat box
  • 35. Maps 101: Mapping Methods #2 &3 Interactive demo: Creating a “Point” and “Thematic” Map on HealthyCity.org 1. Geography 2. Service Type 3. Demographic or other theme Please enter your suggestions in the chat box
  • 36. Wikimaps! A collaborative mapping tool on HealthyCity.org that you can use to share and add community knowledge, points, photos, a nd videos. Participatory Asset Mapping Toolkit, Pg. 22 With Wikimaps, you can: •Share with others to add points, data, and media. •Create a story to share •Print and share on Facebook and Twitter!
  • 37. Maps 101: Mapping Method #4 Interactive demo: Creating a Wikimap on HealthyCity.org 1. Start with w/ a scenario: You are a Community-Based Organization soliciting feedback from community members, collecting data to upload onto a map that will be shared with public officials, foundations and decision-makers. For example: A community walk project where youth can upload photos and descriptions of their routes to school and document where they walk, play, and identify where there are unsafe areas, built environment that needs to be fixed/cleaned, etc. 2. Title & Description of Map 3. Fields for data collection 4. Point to drop or File to upload 5. Name of place, description and any media
  • 38. Map Making 101: Best tips! When mapping Thematic data, do not use more than 5 “classes”. The human eye cannot recognize that many colors at one time! Use caution when you select your map color scheme. Certain colors mean specific things in cartography. Dark blue usually indicates water, vivid green tends to indicate trees and or green space. Bright red indicates danger and carries a negative connotation.
  • 39. Map Making 101: Best tips! Never use white/blank as a color for your data classifications. The only time white should be used is when you are indicating that there is “no data” or a “null value” for that area. Make sure to have all basic map elements present on your map: Legend, North arrow, title, scale and data year/source!
  • 40. Map Design Questions?
  • 41. Map Analysis
  • 42. Map Analysis What to look for in your analysis: 1. Basic Information • What basic information does this map provide? 2. Patterns • • • Is the data evenly distributed or concentrated in specific areas? Are there any clear patterns, any highs or lows? Why do you think these patterns occur? 3. Answers • How does this map help address your research question(s)? 4. Strategy • • How will this map guide your strategy? What information does the map not provide that you might need to investigate further for your strategy?
  • 43. Map Analysis According to the 2010 Census, approximately 87,534 Hispanic/Latino families are living below the poverty level in the city of Los Angeles
  • 44. Map Analysis According 2010 Census data, approximately 871,075 Hispanic/Latino families are living below the poverty level in ZIP 90026 Most of the families living in poverty live in this area
  • 45. Map Analysis Questions?
  • 46. Map Publishing
  • 47. Quick Review: Map Making 101 1. Map-based research: How maps are being used for research and advocacy 2. How to make maps on HealthyCity.org: Point, Thematic and Wikimaps 3. Keys to effective map making: Design, Analysis and Publishing Video: 2:22
  • 48. Workshop Series Overview Workshop #1: Research and Data Revealed: An Introduction to Community Research Workshop #2: Community Assets on a Map: Facilitating a Community-Engaged Mapping Activity Workshop #3: Visualizing Your Community: Creating Maps That Tell Your Community’s Story Workshop #4: Hyperlocal Communication: Sharing Your Maps and Research Workshop #5: From Research to Action!
  • 49. The Community Research Lab Workshop Series workshops total spanning 2.5 days •Five –FREE! –Capacity for 30 people per workshop session –Loads of resources and materials –Bring your own laptop/tablet! •2 workshops a day, with an hour lunch break: –Day One: Workshop #1 9:00am-12:00pm & Workshop #2 1:00pm-4:00pm –Day Two: Workshop #3 9:00am-12:00pm & Workshop #4 1:00pm-4:00pm –Day Three: Workshop #5 9:00am-12:00pm •Dates and Regions: –Riverside: February 10th – 12th APPLY NOW! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_INLANDEMPIRE –Fresno/Central Valley: March 4th-6th APPLY NOW! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014_CENTRALVALLEY Workshop Regions for Fall 2014: San Diego, Orange County and Central Coast!
  • 50. The Community Research Lab Workshop Series One Workshop in Los Angeles One day only! Wednesday, March 19th 9:30am-2:00pm •Workshop #4 Hyperlocal Communications –FREE! –Capacity for 30 people per workshop session –Loads of resources and materials –Bring your own laptop/tablet! APPLY NOW! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/LA_0314 Workshop Regions for Fall 2014: San Diego, Orange County and Central Coast!
  • 51. Maps 101: Complete! Questions?
  • 52. Contact us! Learn more about our data sources, research and events
  • 53. Upcoming Events Community Research Lab Workshop Series: 1. Riverside: February 10th – 12th 2. Fresno: March 4th – 6th 3. Los Angeles (one workshop only!) Wednesday, March 19th 9:30am- 2:00pm Webinar: Wednesday, February 26th, 2014 10:00am-11:00am Using HealthyCity.org for Service Referral & Program Planning Register now: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/regis ter/121893802
  • 54. Thank You! Your feedback is very important to us! Coordinator Training & Communications We will be following up with www.Healthycity.org you in 24 hours with www.AdvancementProjectCA.org an Facebook.com/HealthyCityCA Facebook.com/AdvancementProjectCA @HealthyCityCA email and a survey! info@advanceproj.org info@healthycity.org Lori Thompson Manager, Online & Digital Initiatives lthompson@advanceproj.org Taisha Bonilla Training & Communications Coordinator tbonilla@advanceproj.org