Head and Eye Protection Program Essentials

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This presentation by Magid Glove & Safety and 3M highlights some of the top products available for head and eye protection. It shows the advances made in eye and head safety, the common work hazards …

This presentation by Magid Glove & Safety and 3M highlights some of the top products available for head and eye protection. It shows the advances made in eye and head safety, the common work hazards employees face and tips on keeping workers safe.

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  • 1. Your Partners in Safety Eye Protection Program Essentials Webinar
  • 2. 3M Eyewear, Head and Face Protection Products
  • 3. 3 Agenda  Introductions  Chris Dujovski -- Product Marketer – Head, Eye & Face  Safety Eyewear Hazards & Hazard Analysis  Safety Eyewear Selection & Styles – Face Protection Options  Q & A ??
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  • 13. 13 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards- Section 1  Not Wearing Eye Protection Nearly three out of five workers injured were not wearing eye protection at the time of the accident.  Wearing the Wrong Kind of Protection For the Job About 40% of the injured workers were wearing some form of eye protection when the accident occurred. However these workers were most likely wearing protective eyeglasses with no side shields. Source: 1993 OSHA Fact Sheet No. 93-03. What Contributes to Eye Injuries at Work? A 1980 survey by the Labor’s Department’s Bureau of Labor statistics of about 1,000 minor eye injuries revealed how and why many on the job accidents occur.
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  • 15. 15 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye Hazard Training – Module 1 Objectives The purpose of this training is to:  Help you identify the types of tasks that may require the use of protective eyewear. (Section 1)  Help you understand how the eye reacts to light. (Section 2)  Provide a brief overview of the light spectrum and potential occupational hazards. (Section 3) You will be required to go through each topic to complete this module.
  • 16. 16 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards Flying Particles • Almost 70% of accidents resulted from flying or falling objects or sparks striking the eye. • Injured workers estimated that nearly three-fifths of the objects were smaller than a pinhead. • Contact with chemicals caused one-fifth of the injuries. What Causes Eye Injuries? Source: 1993 OSHA Fact Sheet No. 93-03.
  • 17. 17 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Eye and face protection must be selected on the basis of potential hazards to which the worker may be exposed. How is Proper Eye and Face Protection Selected? Occupational Eye Hazards
  • 18. 18 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards  A first critical step in developing a comprehensive safety and health program is to identify potential physical and health hazards in the workplace. This process is known as a "hazard assessment." A properly conducted hazard assessment identifies routine and non- routine activities and tasks which have increased risk of exposure to eye and face hazards, among other types of hazards. Hazard Assessment
  • 19. 19 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards  The hazard assessment is the responsibility of the employer’s health and safety administrator.  In the United States, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) Personal Protective Equipment Standard 1910.132(d)(1) specifies employer and employee obligations to help reduce the risk of exposure to hazards. Hazard Assessment
  • 20. 20 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards A hazard assessment specific to eye and face hazards should begin with a walk-through survey of the facility to develop a list of potential eye and face hazards such as: • Impact- Flying fragments, objects, large chips, particles, etc. • Dust- Nuisance dust • Chemical -Splash and irritating mists • Optical Radiation - Glare • Optical Radiation - Welding, cutting, torch brazing • Heat -Hot sparks, splash from molten metal • General Lighting - Fluorescent /incandescent, low light • Special Applications - Inspection, repair, detail work Hazard Assessment (Eye Hazard Specific)
  • 21. 21 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Impact Common Related Applications Tasks that may present impact hazards to the eyes and face of workers:  Chipping  Drilling  Grinding  Riveting  Crushing
  • 22. 22 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Dust Common Related Applications Tasks that may present dust hazards to the eyes and face of workers:  Woodworking  Buffing  Grinding  General dusty conditions
  • 23. 23 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Chemical Common Related Applications Tasks that may present chemical hazards to the eyes and face of workers:  Acid and chemical handling  Degreasing  Plating  Pouring  Spraying
  • 24. 24 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Optical Radiation (Glare)  Working outdoors in bright sun  Driving Common Related Applications Tasks that may present optical radiation (glare) hazards to the eyes and face of workers:
  • 25. 25 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Optical Radiation (Welding)  Electric arc welding  Gas welding  Torch brazing  Torch soldering  Cutting Common Related Applications Tasks that may present optical radiation (welding) hazards to the eyes and face of workers:
  • 26. 26 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Occupational Eye Hazards - Heat Common Related Applications/Tasks  Furnace operations  Pouring  Casting  Hot dipping  Gas cutting and welding End of Topic
  • 27. 27 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. 400-700nm Visible light range 700nm-1mm Infrared 400 nm Ultraviolet Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  Ultraviolet (UV) Less than 400 nanometers (nm)  Visible 400 nm to 700 nanometers  Infrared (IR) Higher than 700 nanometers Wavelengths UV to IR
  • 28. 28 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  Ultraviolet rays have shorter wavelengths and more energy than visible light rays and can cause acute harmful effects or chronic harmful effects, depending on the wavelength, energy level, and duration of exposure. Ultraviolet Radiation (UV)
  • 29. 29 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  UVA- (320 - 400 nm) UVA rays are absorbed by the lens of your eye. Extended exposure to UVA rays can lead to the formation of cataracts.  UVB - (290 - 320 nm) UVB is a physically painful form of ultraviolet radiation. Exposure to UVB can temporarily damage the cornea. This band of radiation causes cancer and burning of the eye and has been linked to damage of the lens inside the eye.  UVC- (200 - 290 nm) UVC emitted from the sun is absorbed by the atmospheric ozone layer and never reaches your eyes. Ultraviolet Radiation (UV)
  • 30. 30 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  The sun is our primary natural source of UV radiation. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards Ultraviolet Radiation – Natural Sources
  • 31. 31 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Arc welding  Electrical arcing  Arc furnaces  Ultraviolet lamps  Lasers (Excimer)  Certain adhesive, ink and paint curing lamps  Tanning beds Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards Ultraviolet Radiation- Artificial Sources UV radiation can also be generated from artificial sources including:
  • 32. 32 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards Ultraviolet Radiation-Eyewear Protection  A polycarbonate lens is capable of filtering 99.9% UV.  UV inhibitors are often added to the base polycarbonate material from which safety lenses are made.
  • 33. 33 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  Visible light waves are the only electromagnetic waves we can see. We see these waves as the colors of the rainbow. Each color has a different wavelength. Red has the longest wavelength and violet has the shortest wavelength.  When all the waves are seen together, they make white light. Visible Light Visible Spectrum of Light LongShort
  • 34. 34 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  When white light shines through a prism, the white light is broken apart into the colors of the visible light spectrum. Visible Light White Light
  • 35. 35 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  Visible light has a band from 400 nm to 700 nm. Visible Light Visible Light Range
  • 36. 36 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Overexposure to visible light can cause eye strain and headaches. Visible Light Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards
  • 37. 37 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards • Sunlight • Spot lights • Flood lights • Flash lamps • High temperature furnaces • Visible Wavelength Lasers (e.g. Argon and Ruby) Visible Light  Typical Sources of Visible Radiation Include:
  • 38. 38 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Visible Light Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  Certain gray, light blue, tan, bronze, mirror, and indoor outdoor mirror lenses are effective in helping to reducing glare from the sun and certain bright lights.  Lighting conditions in the work environment and the need for filtering of specific visible light wavelengths can dictate vision enhancement and glare reduction requirements.
  • 39. 39 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards  The infrared light spectrum is medium to long wavelengths of light located in the upper middle to upper portion of the optical spectrum. Infrared Radiation (IR) Infrared Light Range
  • 40. 40 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Typical industrial sources of infrared include: • Open furnaces • Molten metal operations • Heat lamps • Quartz lamps, • Electric arc welding • Gas welding Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards Infrared Radiation
  • 41. 41 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Exposure to infrared light can heat the lens of the eye and produce cataracts over a long period of time. Light Spectrum and Occupational Hazards Infrared Radiation
  • 42. 42 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  Non-prescription safety spectacles  Prescription safety spectacles  Goggles  Faceshields  Welding helmets  Full facepiece and loose fitting respirators Safety Eye and Face Protection Can Include the Following:
  • 43. 43 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  Safety eyewear is intended to help shield the wearer's eyes from potential impact hazards such as flying fragments, objects, large chips, and particles.  Employees who wear prescription lenses while engaged in operations that involve exposure to potential eye hazards should wear eye protection that incorporates the prescription in its design, or wear safety glasses or goggles that fit over the prescription glasses.
  • 44. 44 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Non-Prescription Safety Spectacles– Many Options! Selecting Eye and Face Protection
  • 45. 45 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Lenses are offered in different tints and colors for a variety of reasons, including reduction of Ultraviolet (UV) or Infrared (IR) exposure, vision enhancement, glare reduction or style preference.  Understanding lens tints is critical in matching the appropriate safety eyewear with the environment.  It is the employer’s responsibility to conduct a workplace hazard assessment and provide personal protective equipment that protects against the potential hazards identified. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Why is lens color an important consideration?
  • 46. 46 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  A yellow tint on a lens helps make objects appear sharper against a blue or green background.  An amber lens can block the blue portion of the visible light spectrum, creating maximum contrast enhancement, particularly in low light.  Yellow tints are good for overcast, hazy or foggy conditions. Yellow and Amber Lenses
  • 47. 47 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  Developed for semiconductor fabrication, photolithography and similar industries where there is medium to high levels of yellow incandescent/fluorescent lamps, or high and low pressure sodium vapor lighting.  Can be useful as a general glare reducer in certain work environments where there is strong glare from bright lighting. Light Blue Lens
  • 48. 48 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  For certain outdoor applications where light and glare can cause eye strain and fatigue.  A gray tint can help provide protection from glare and can help keep distortion of colors to a minimum. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Gray Lens
  • 49. 49 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  A clear lens with a slight mirror coating, it can serve the same purpose as a gray lens, yet allow more visible light through the lens for certain indoor/outdoor uses.  Can help reduce glare from certain artificial light sources.  Not as dark as a normal sunglass lens and is typically used in applications where the workers must pass between indoor and outdoor duties or where a normal sunglass lens is too dark. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Indoor/Outdoor Lens
  • 50. 50 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Use the bronze/brown lens for certain outdoor applications where sunlight and glare may cause eye strain and fatigue.  The bronze/brown tints work well in many variable light conditions and can provide good contrast because they filter some blue light, although not as strongly as a yellow tint. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Bronze/Brown Lens
  • 51. 51 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  A mirror lens can be used outdoors where sunlight and glare may cause eye strain and fatigue. Mirror coating reflect certain light, reducing the amount of light that passes through the lens. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Mirror Lens
  • 52. 52 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  The 3M TM MinimIzeR is a reduced IR lens designed specifically for work around certain shielded welding operations or under welding helmets.  This lens can help protect against some infrared radiation and “flash burn”, a common and damaging hazard that can occur when workers are exposed to welding arcs.  Not designed to be worn as primary eye protection in welding, cutting, torch brazing, or torch soldering. 3M TM MinimIzeR TM (Reduced IR Lens)
  • 53. 53 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  When a photochromic lens is exposed to outdoor ultraviolet light, the lens automatically darkens for added protection against bright light.  The photochromic lens is useful for certain utility work, landscaping, and construction. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Photochromic Lens
  • 54. 54 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  The photochromic lens should not be used in situations which require quickly moving back and forth from one “light environment” to another (such as fork lift drivers going from inside to outside).  Not for driving. Selecting Eye and Face Protection Photochromic Lens
  • 55. 55 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Can be used outdoors to help protect from excessive glare that can cause eye strain and fatigue.  Polarized lenses can help reduce the reflected glare which is most noticeable on water, snow, concrete and asphalt surfaces.  Polarized lenses contain a special filter that blocks certain reflected light, thereby reducing glare. . Selecting Eye and Face Protection Polarized Lens
  • 56. 56 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division Selecting Eye and Face Protection  The Green/I.R. Shade lens may be appropriate in certain applications where there is heat, such as metal making, furnace work, trash incineration and open flames. Green/I.R. Shade Lens
  • 57. 57 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Selecting Eye and Face Protection  A clear lens can provide maximum visual acuity and color recognition.  A clear polycarbonate lens is capable of filtering out 99.9% UV light. Clear Lens
  • 58. 58 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division Section 2 Eye and Face Protection Options
  • 59. 59 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options-Section 2  Designed to fit over many different styles of personal prescription eyewear. Spectacles OTG (Over the Glass)
  • 60. 60 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Can provide magnification for reading or precision work, while providing protection against certain impacts.  Available in diopters +1.5, +2.0 and +2.5 Bifocals Safety Spectacles for Special Applications Eye and Face Protection Options
  • 61. 61 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Safety eyewear with LED (light-emitting diodes), can provide task lighting while providing protection against certain impacts. Safety Spectacles for Special Applications Eye and Face Protection Options
  • 62. 62 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Polycarbonate • Stronger and more impact resistant than glass or plastic • Lightweight  Cast Resin (e.g., CR-39®*) • Mainly used in safety prescription spectacles  Safety Glass • Some prescription eyewear products • Special purpose lenses • More scratch resistant than polycarbonate and plastic • Heavier and less impact-resistant than plastic *CR-39® is a registered trademark of PPG industries Selecting Eye and Face Protection Lens Materials
  • 63. 63 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options  Softness properties of polycarbonate typically require that a scratch-resistant coating be applied to the lens by the manufacturer to improve durability.  Other coatings, such as anti-fog, can be applied to a lens to improve performance in harsh environments. Anti-fog coatings are generally not permanent and will erode after repeated cleanings.  Proper care and cleaning of an anti-fog lens, following the manufacturer’s recommendations, can help maintain coating performance. Lens Coatings
  • 64. 64 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Hard Coat (H/C)  A hard coat can help provide scratch resistance to a polycarbonate, lens which typically scratches very easily without such protection. Anti-Fog (A/F)  An anti-fog coating is ideal for workers in many extremely hot, cold or humid conditions. 3M ™DX™ Anti-Fog Hard Coat  DX™ is a combination anti-fog, and hard coat that helps provide abrasion resistance and helps to prevent fogging. Eye and Face Protection Options Lens Coatings
  • 65. 65 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options Fitting of Safety Spectacles  The closer the eyewear fits to the face, the less chance of an object getting in around the edge of the eyewear and striking the eye.  The nosepiece should not slide down the face due to sweat or moisture.  Temples should fit comfortably over the ears.
  • 66. 66 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options Fitting of Safety Spectacles Many protective eyewear products offer adjustable features and soft materials in points of contact in order to improve fit and comfort to accommodate different face sizes and shapes. Pantoscopic lens adjustment (3 positions) Adjustable temple length Adjustable Nose Piece
  • 67. 67 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Direct vent goggles can help to provide protection against dust and particulates.  They should not be used where a chance of chemical splash can occur. Eye and Face Protection Options Goggles Direct Vent
  • 68. 68 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Indirect vent goggles can help provide protection against certain airborne particulates and chemical splash.  The vents are designed to allow for adequate ventilation, yet help protect the wearer from liquids entering the eye area. Eye and Face Protection Options Goggles Indirect Vent
  • 69. 69 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Non–Vented  Non Vented goggles can offer better protection against certain liquids and dusts then vented goggles. Eye and Face Protection Options Goggles
  • 70. 70 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Extend from the brow to below the chin and across the width of the face and are used to help protect the eye and face against certain impact, chemical, heat and glare hazards. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshields
  • 71. 71 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Faceshields are available in many different materials, shapes, sizes, thicknesses and filters (colors).  Use caution when selecting a faceshield, all faceshields are not alike and extreme caution must be exercised in their selection to ensure that the hazardous light is being reduced or eliminated. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshield Options
  • 72. 72 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  The shape and size of the window needs to be selected to provide adequate coverage of the face while allowing free movement of the head.  A window that is too large may cause restricted head movement while a window that is too small may expose the face, side of head, chin or ears to the hazard. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshield Options
  • 73. 73 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Common faceshield materials are polycarbonate, acetate, propionate and PETG. (Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol) Polycarbonate  For use in certain applications with high impact and liquid splash hazards.  PETG, Propionate and Acetate For use in certain applications with basic impact and liquid splash hazards. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshields
  • 74. 74 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Mesh  For use where increased air circulation is desirable along with face protection (example: forestry and hot environments).  Metal mesh faceshields are designed to help protect the wearer from heat sources when there is no risk from molten metal or liquid splash. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshields
  • 75. 75 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshields Dark and Medium Green Tint  Faceshields with a green tint are used to help to provide protection from glare.
  • 76. 76 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Reflective coated faceshields are available with an aluminized or gold coating on the outside surface.  Reflective coatings are designed to help protect the wearer from high heat sources by reflecting the heat away from the wearer’s face. Eye and Face Protection Options Faceshields- Reflective Coatings
  • 77. 77 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved.  Eye and face protection should be inspected prior to each use.  Check the frame and lenses to make sure that there are no cracks or missing parts.  Immediately replace the eyewear if any cracks or missing parts are identified.  Immediately replace lenses and faceshields that are scratched or pitted, or otherwise replace entire device.  For shaded or coated lenses, replace lenses or faceshields if the shade has faded or the coating loses its intended properties. Eye and Face Protection Options Maintenance
  • 78. 78 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division © 3M 2010. All Rights Reserved. Eye and Face Protection Options  Eye and face protection should be periodically cleaned, especially if visibly soiled.  Care must be taken when the lenses or windows have special coatings, such as anti-fog, as the coatings may be negatively affected with some cleaning agents.  Most eye and face protection can be cleaned with water and mild detergent.  Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning. Lens Cleaning
  • 79. 79 3M Occupational Health and Environmental Safety Division Total Eyewear Solutions (prescription and non-prescription) Consulting / Specialization Fitting of both prescription and non-prescription safety eyewear Supply chain excellence for prescription and non-prescription Complete Product Line (frames, lenses, accessories) Science of Fit + Advanced Coatings Wash and Cleaning Stations A complete offering to be the Industrial Safety Eyewear Leader
  • 80. Chris Dujovski Head, Eye & Face Protection 3M Personal Safety Division Office: 651 736 4608 Mobile: 734 341 4848 cjdujovski@mmm.com 2060 North Kolmar Avenue • Chicago, IL 60639 Call Toll-Free: 800.444.8030 • Fax: 773.384.6677 mail@magidglove.com • www.magidglove.com