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  • In this presentation we will explore national strategic imperatives. This includes the different Educational aspects, goals, agendas objectives and broad aims of the present and future national strategic imperatives.
  • First let us take a look at the Knowledge Society Agenda. Knowledge can be defined as the output of the reconstruction of information by a person, according to their history and context, depending on the person. Information can be is given and knowledge is then acquired.
  • Knowledge society is a human society, where knowledge should bring justice, solidarity, democracy and peace.
  • It is a society in which knowledge could be a force for changing society.
  • It should provide universal and equitable access to information. Information and communication technology (ICT) must be integrated in order to build the Knowledge Society.The Knowledge Society needs new kinds of Knowledge that cannot reduce to traditional disciplines.
  • The school in the knowledge society involves not only technology, but a new conception of teaching, training, learning, managing differently time and space, individualisation and collaboration, interactive content and interactive tutoring. The school of the future is about extending the market model, “re-schooling” (Schools as core social centres and focused learning organisations) and “de-schooling” (Learner networks and the network society),
  • Being a teacher in the Knowledge Society requires new specific competencies: a teacher has to deal with new knowledge, discover new ways for accessing knowledge; with a networked world and with new types of co-operation and collaboration; with a society in which knowledge plays a crucial role; with lifelong learning. Teachers are the key agents in the education system. It is our common responsibility to help all countries to train and recruit teachers, and to involve all teachers in international networks. ICT changes teaching and learning, but technology is not the main issue. “Technology matters, but good teachers and good teaching, matters more”.
  • Being a teacher in the knowledge society, knowledge of Technology, new pedagogical possibilities, new management of time and space, new knowledge, new networked form of knowledge and new expectations of Society.
  • As educators, we want not only an Information Society, but a Knowledge Society, enabling all children and all people to access Knowledge and to benefit from being educated. Education is a key issue in the Knowledge Society, and therefore Educators have a major mission. Particularly, it is the responsibility of all educators and decision-makers around the world to help developing countries to take part in the developments of ICT in Education.
  • The Knowledge Society therefore basically is about knowledge, in it’s various aspects but it results in being Knowledge driven.
  • Secondly let us take a look at the “Education for all” Goals
  • The National Planning Commission and the Monitoring Report on Education for all by 2015 discusses various qualities that need to take place towards Education.
  • The six main goals for the “Education for all” initiative include: Expanding early childhood care and education, Providing free and compulsory primaryeducation to all, Promoting learning and life skills for youngpeople and adults, Increasing adult literacy by 50 percent, Achieving gender parity by 2005, genderequality by 2015 and Improving the quality of education.
  • Furthermore the key options for success in this regard are the following: The active efforts of all South Africans, reconstructing the economy and a growth in employment, an improvement in the quality of education, training, innovation and a healthy population, an inclusive rural economy, human settlements, health care for all, building safer communities and fighting corruption.
  • Mainly improving the quality of education because poor-quality education denies many learners of employment opportunities and it affects the South African business. Improving the quality of education therefore requires careful management and support from all people who are involved.
  • Both theNational Planning Commission and the Monitoring Report on Education say that urgent action needs to take place, firstly within the households and the communities. Secondly there must be an improvement in the management of the education system.
  • Thirdly they aim to improve the competence and capacity of school principles.
  • Fourthly and more importantly teacher performance must have the appropriate content and pedagogical support.
  • In further detail the targets are to get rid of all nutrient deficiencies in children under 18 months by designing a nutrition intervention for pregnant women and young children to avoid malnutrition and difficulty in receiving quality education. Also all children should have at least two years of pre-school education and at least 80 percent of children should complete 12 years of schooling and achieve 50 percent and above in literacy, mathematics and sciences.
  • The actions towards achieving this involves improving the further education and training graduation rate to 75 percent by 2030 and significantly expanding further education and training sectors as they improve the quality and relevance of their courses.
  • To increase the higher education participation rate from 17 percent to 30 percent.The actions towards the targets with regard to schooling include increasing teacher training by expanding FunzaLushaka Bursaries to attract learners into teaching, especially those with good maths, science and language grades.
  • To regularly test teachers in subjects they teach to determine their level of knowledge and competence and link teacher pay to learner performance and improvements. Then the schools performing very poorly should receive the closest attention.
  • The further education and training system must strengthen and expand the number of colleges in order for the participation rate to also increase, by building new universities in provinces such as Mpumalanga and the Northern Cape and the also providing full assistance covering tuition, books accommodation and living allowance in the form of loans and bursaries to all students who need it.
  • All of these characteristics and targets can be achieved by nationally changing society and uniting the nation.
  • Then let us take a look atThe broad aims of the various national and international initiatives regarding continuous professional development of teachers with regard to teacher competency standards relating to ICTs and professional aptitude.
  • Begin with the fact that all teachers will thus require the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes, as well as the necessary support, to integrate ICT into teaching and learning, and to support them in their various roles as mediators of learning, interpreters and designers of learning programmes, leaders, administrators, scholars, assessors and subject specialists.
  • In the approach to teacher development, in ICT it takes place by bringing in certain essential principles, this document reflects a holistic approach to teacher development in ICT. It acknowledges that ICT skills cannot be practised without their context
  • There are five different Development levelsThe White Paper on e-Education outlines them as follows:
  • In the Entry level the teacher is computer literate and is able to use computers. Although frustrations are common in the introduction of ICT and they may influence teachers to lack confidence.
  • In the Adoption level the teacher is able to use various ICT, including computers, to support administration, teaching and learning, and is able to teach learners how to use ICT.
  • In the Adaptation level the teacher is able to use ICT to support everyday classroom activities at an appropriate NCS level, assess the learning that takes place and ensure progression. He/she is able to reflect critically on how ICT changes the teaching and learning processes and to use ICT systems for management and administration. Productivity increases at this level.
  • In theAppropriation level the teacher has a holistic approach towards the ways in which ICT contributes to teaching and learning. He/she has an understanding of the developing nature of ICT, and an awarenessto the structure and purposes of the NCS. He/she has the experience and confidence to reflect on how ICT can influence teaching and learning strategies, and to use new strategies.
  • In the innovation level the teacher is able to develop entirely new learning environments that use ICT as a flexible tool, so that learning becomes collaborative and interactive. ICT is integrated as a flexible tool for whole-school development through reconstructing the classrooms and creating learning experiences influenced by technology. With regard to ICT Professional Aptitude, the teacher has the confidence, flexibility and vision to develop learning approaches that use ICT, and understands that ICT is essential for entireschool development 

Transcript

  • 1. What about these National Strategic Imperatives?
  • 2. Knowledge can be definedas: Information and skillsacquired throughexperience or education The understanding of asubject
  • 3.  A Human Society Knowledge shouldbring: justice, solidarity,
  • 4.  democracy and peace
  • 5. It should provide universal and equitable access toinformation.Information and communication technology (ICT)must be integrated in order to build the KnowledgeSociety.The Knowledge Society needs new kinds ofKnowledge that cannot reduce to traditionaldisciplines
  • 6.  The school in the knowledge society involves anew conception of teaching, training, interactivecontent and interactive tutoring. The school of the future is about extending themarket model, “re-schooling” and “de-schooling”.
  • 7.  In the knowledge societynew competencies arerequired. A teacher has to dealwith new knowledge Discover new ways foraccessing knowledge Teachers are the keyagents in theeducation system It is our commonresponsibility to trainand recruit teachers,and, To involve all teachersin internationalnetworks.
  • 8. Knowledge of :Technology, New pedagogical possibilities,New management of time and space,New knowledge, new networked form ofknowledge and ,New expectations of Society.
  • 9. Enables all children andall people to access knowledgeand to benefit from beingeducated. Educators have amajor mission. Particularly,it is the responsibility of alleducators and decision-makers around the world tohelp take part in thedevelopments of ICT inEducation.Education is akey issue in theKnowledgeSociety!
  • 10. TheKnowledgeSociety
  • 11. Shortages of qualifiedteachers threaten theachievement of“Education for all”(EFA)
  • 12.  Expanding early childhood care and education Providing free and compulsory primary education to all Promoting learning and life skills for young people andadults Increasing adult literacy by 50 percent Achieving gender parity by 2005, gender equality by 2015 Improving the quality of education
  • 13.  The active efforts of all South Africans, Reconstructing the economy , A growth in employment, An improvement in the quality of education,training, innovation and a healthy population, An inclusive rural economy, human settlements, Health care for all, Building safer communities and Fighting corruption.
  • 14. Improving the quality ofeducation therefore requirescareful management and supportfrom all people whoare involvedPoor-qualityeducation candeny learnersemploymentopportunities
  • 15. Firstly within the households and the communities.Secondly there must be an improvement in themanagement of the education system.
  • 16. Thirdly they aim to improve thecompetence and capacity of schoolprinciples
  • 17. Fourthly and more importantly teacherperformance must have the appropriatecontent and pedagogical support.
  • 18.  Get rid of all nutrient deficiencies in childrenunder 18 months . Also all children should have at least two years ofpre-school education a And at least 80 percent of children shouldcomplete 12 years of schooling and achieve 50percent and above in literacy, mathematics andsciences.
  • 19.  Designing a nutrition intervention for pregnantwomen and young children to avoid malnutrition. Improving the further education and traininggraduation rate to 75 percent by 2030 And significantly expanding further education.
  • 20. To increase the higher education participation rate from17 percent to 30 percent.The actions towards the targets with regard to schoolinginclude increasing teacher training by expanding FunzaLushaka Bursaries to attract learners into teaching,especially those with good maths, science and languagegrades.
  • 21. Also... To regularly test teachers in subjects theyteach to determine their level of knowledge andcompetence and link teacher pay to learnerperformance and improvements. Then the schoolsperforming very poorly should receive the closestattention.
  • 22. And... The further education and training system muststrengthen and expand the number of colleges in order for theparticipation rate to also increase, by building new universitiesin provinces such as Mpumalanga and the Northern Cape andthe also providing full assistance covering tuition, booksaccommodation and living allowance in the form of loans andbursaries to all students who need it.
  • 23. Goals“Educationforall”
  • 24.  The fact that all teachers will thus require theknowledge, skills, values and attitudes, The necessary support, to integrate ICT intoteaching and learning, And support in their various roles as mediators oflearning, interpreters and designers of learningprogrammes, leaders, administrators, scholars,assessors and subject specialists.
  • 25.  In ICT development takes place by bringing incertain essential principles, this document reflectsa holistic approach to teacher development in ICT. It acknowledges that ICT skills cannot be practisedwithout their context.
  • 26.  The White Paper on e-Education outlines them asfollows:AppropriationAdaptationAdoptionEntryInnovation
  • 27.  The teacher is computer literate and is able to usecomputers.Although frustrations are common in theintroduction of ICT and may influence teachers tolack confidence.
  • 28.  The teacher is able to use various ICT, includingcomputers, to support administration, teachingand learning, and is able to teach learners how touse ICT.
  • 29.  In the Adaptation level the teacher is able to useICT to support everyday classroom activities at anappropriate NCS level, assess the learning thattakes place and ensure progression. He/she is able to reflect critically on how ICTchanges the teaching and learning processes andto use ICT systems for management andadministration. Productivity increases at this level.
  • 30.  The teacher has a holistic approach towards theways in which ICT contributes to teaching andlearning. He/she has an understanding of the developingnature of ICT, and an awareness to the structureand purposes of the NCS. He/she has the experience and confidence toreflect on how ICT can influence teaching andlearning strategies, and to use new strategies.
  • 31.  The teacher is able to develop new learningenvironments that use ICT as a flexible tool, sothat learning becomes collaborative andinteractive. With regard to ICT Professional Aptitude, theteacher has the confidence, flexibility and vision todevelop learning approaches that use ICT, andunderstands that ICT is essential for entire schooldevelopment.
  • 32.  Department of Education. (2004). WhitePaper on e-Education. Government Gazette.(No. 26734). Education international. (2008).EducationFor All by 2015. Response to the GlobalMonitoring Report. www.ei-ie.org Hindle, D. (2007). Guidelines for TeacherTraining and Professional Development inICT. Cornu B. (2001). Being a Teacher in theKnowledge Society. Presentation (INRP,CNED-EIFAD, France).References