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Promotion of Agricultural Product (Jute, Sweetmeat) in Districts (Shariatpur, Rajbari) of Bangladesh

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Bangladesh is traditionally an agro-based country for geographical reasons. Historically agricultural products play a major role in the GDP of the country. Recent statistical data shows that …

Bangladesh is traditionally an agro-based country for geographical reasons. Historically agricultural products play a major role in the GDP of the country. Recent statistical data shows that agricultural products are now at 3rd position in the sectoral share of GDP.

The economic condition, per capita income and quality of life of Bangladesh can be improved if proper emphasis is given on the agricultural sector and appropriate promotion strategy for the agricultural industry is undertaken. This promotion strategy should be undertaken in different scales on the basis of need and priority.

In Bangladesh there are lots of National level goals and policies for industrial promotion and there are also some Local level plans; but the intermediate stage (Regional level) between these two is always neglected. National level plans are always too broad on the other hand Local level plans are too specific. A combination of these two scales of planning is needed for quick and efficient improvement strategy.

In this study Regional promotional strategy for two agricultural products in two different districts (Jute-Shariatpur; Sweetmeat-Rajbari) is discussed to minimize the above mentioned gap between National and Local level.

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  • 1. Promotion of Agricultural Products in Districts of Bangladesh Jute: Shariatpur Sweetmeat: Rajbari Course No: Plan 434 Course Title: Regional Planning Studio Submitted to: Dr. Ishrat Islam, Assistant Professor, Dept. of URP Anindya Kishore Debnath, Lecturer, Dept. of URP Submitted by: Rifat Rahman (0615005) Nabila Nur Kuhu (0615009) Shahadat Hossain Shakil (0615020) Khaled Bin Abdul Quadir (0615030) Level-4, Term-1 Date of Submission: 8th April, 2011 Department of Urban and Regional Planning Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
  • 2. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Table of ContentsContents Page No.Title PageTable of ContentsChapter 01: Introduction 11.1 Background of the study 11.2 Objective of the Study 11.3 Methodology of the Study 2Chapter 02: Promoting Jute Production in Shariatpur District 22.1 Jute Profile 22.2 Reasons for Jute Promotion 32.3 Shariatpur Profile 32.4 Reasons for Promoting Jute in Shariatpur District 32.5 SWOT Analysis 42.6 Promoting Strategy 5Chapter 03: Promoting Sweetmeat Production in Rajbari District 63.1 Sweetmeat Profile 63.2 Reasons for Sweetmeat Promotion 73.3 Rajbari Profile 73.4 Reasons for Promoting Sweetmeat in Rajbari 83.5 SWOT Analysis 93.6 Promoting Strategy 9Chapter 04: Conclusion 10AppendicesReferences 2|Page
  • 3. PLAN 434 Regional Planning StudioChapter 01: Introduction1.1 Background of the study Bangladesh is traditionally an agro-based country for geographical reasons. Historically agricultural products play a major role in the GDP of the country. Recent statistical data shows that agricultural products are now at 3 rd position in the sectoral share of GDP. Sectoral Share of G.D.P. At Current Price 2004-2005 2005-2006 (%) Service 49.42 49.22 Industry 28.81 29.01 Agriculture 22.27 21.77 Source: Bangladesh Data Sheet, National Accounts Wing, BBS. The economic condition, per capita income and quality of life of Bangladesh can be improved if proper emphasis is given on the agricultural sector and appropriate promotion strategy for the agricultural industry is undertaken. This promotion strategy should be undertaken in different scales on the basis of need and priority. In Bangladesh there are lots of National level goals and policies for industrial promotion and there are also some Local level plans; but the intermediate stage (Regional level) between these two is always neglected. National level plans are always too broad on the other hand Local level plans are too specific. A combination of these two scales of planning is needed for quick and efficient improvement strategy. In this study Regional promotional strategy for two agricultural products in two different districts (Jute-Shariatpur; Sweetmeat-Rajbari) is discussed to minimize the above mentioned gap between National and Local level.1.2 Objective of the Study  Identifying preferable locations for a specific agricultural product.  Analyzing the scopes and limitations for the promotion of that specific product on that specific area.  Developing a promotional strategy. 3|Page
  • 4. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio1.3 Methodology of the Study Project Identification and Fixation of Objectives Literature Review and Data Collection (for both Product and Location) Analyzing the Opportunities and Weakness (for both Product and Location) Developing a promotional strategy (for a specific product in a specific area)Chapter 02: Promoting Jute Production in Shariatpur District2.1 Jute ProfileJute dicotyledenous fiber-yielding plant of the genus Corchorus, order Tiliaceae. Jute wasonce known as the golden fiber of Bangladesh, since it was the most important cash crop forthe country. It is grown in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Nepal, China, Taiwan, Thailand,Vietnam, Cambodia, Brazil and some other countries.Jute grows well where the annual rainfall is 1500 mm or more, with at least 250 mm duringeach of the months of March, April and May. The optimum range of temperature required is18°-33°C. Jute is cultivated in the rainy season. In Bangladesh sowing usually starts at theend of February and continues up to the end of May, depending on the species. Jute can begrown in a number of soil types, ranging from clay to sandy loam with optimum fertility, andsoil pH ranging from 5.0-8.6.Cultivation of jute is quite hard and painstaking. It has a number of stages of processingnamely preparing the land, sowing, weeding, harvesting, retting, extraction of fibre, washing,cleaning and drying etc. It’s a yearly crop and takes about 120 days (April/May-July/August)to complete the process of cultivation.Use: Jute and jute-based products are put to a wide range of uses. Since ancient times it hasbeen used as a raw material for packaging. Before being used as a commercial commodity itwas used in different parts of the world to make household and farm implements such asropes, handmade clothes, wall hangings, etc. Its leaves and roots were used as herbalmedicine and as vegetable by the local people. Traditionally, use of jute products are limited 4|Page
  • 5. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studioto packaging materials like twine, hessian, gunny bag, twill, carpet backing, wool pack,tarpaulin, mats, canvas, wall cover, upholstery, and as furnishing fabrics of different typesand natures. (Source: Banglapedia; Jute)2.5 Reasons for Jute Promotion  Jute – ‘The Golden Fiber’ used to contribute 90% of the country’s total export earnings during 1960-70. (See Chart: Appendix a)  At present - 35% of the world demand for Jute supplied by Bangladesh and ‘Jute Sector’ holds the 3rd and 5th position in export receipts. (See Chart: Appendix a)  Potential sector because – demand is increasing for diversified and environment friendly use of Jute based products; i.e. - Geo Bags for Embankment. ‘Polythene’ use is declining because of rise in the price of Petroleum; Jute – the main substitute for Polythene. (Moazzem G. K.; Rahman T. M. and Sobhan A.)2.3 Shariatpur ProfileShariatpur District (Dhaka division) with an area of 1181.53 sq.km. is bounded byMunshiganj district on the North, Barisal district on the South, Chandpur district on the East,Madaripur district on the west. Main rivers are Padma, Meghna, Palong and Kirtinasha.Total population of Shariatpur is 1057181. Main occupation is agriculture and agriculturallaborer; jointly near about 70%. Total cultivable land 83805 hectares. Among this single crop22.24%, double crop 50.12% and treble crop land is 27.64%. Main crops are Jute, Paddy,Wheat, Sweet Potato, Onion, Garlic, and Tomato. Main exports are Jute, Onion, Garlic, andTomato. (Source: Banglapedia; Shariatpur District) (See Map of Shariatpur: Appendix b)2.4 Reasons for Promoting Jute in Shariatpur District  Ideal condition for Jute growing in terms of ‘Geographic Characteristics’ : The geographical crucial factor for Jute growing such as Tempareture, Humidity, Rainfall etc is perfectly well matched with the geographical characteristics of Shariyatpur. (See Table : Appendix b)  Labor force : Jute production process is highly labour oriented. The number of labour required for per ton of production in comparision with Rice is almost double. (See Table : Appendix f). In Shariatpur the agricultural labour force is near about 70 % 5|Page
  • 6. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio of the total labour force. (Source: Banglapedia; Shariatpur District). So the availability of the labour for further promotion of Jute production is enough.  LQ value : LQ value (313.678) is highest in terms of production. This means the regional share of Jute production is extremely high than the national share in Shariatpur. LQ value (1.519) is Moderately Above to the National Average in case of production rate. This indicates the rate of productivity is also good in Shariatpur for Jute production. (See Table and Map : Appendix c, d1, d2)  Favourable position with respect to the location of the Jute Mills : Three main concentic zone of Bangladesh for Jute Mills are Dhaka (Narayanganj and Narsingdi), Khulna and Chittagong. Shariatpur is closely located to Narayanganj. In terms of production rate the most favorable location for Jute production is Narayanganj. The combined map of LQ value (production rate) and Jute Mills location shows that maximum Jute Mills are located in the high productive zone; in and around Narayanganj. (See Map : Appendix e1, e2, e3)  Close proximity to Air port and Sea port : Jute prodution is majorly export oriented. For exporting to abroad location of the Sea port and Air port from the industry is very imortant. Shariatpur is closely located to Dhaka so the locational proximity with Air port is good. The Mongla Sea port of Khulna is also not very far. So the location is also suitable for Shipping . (See Map : Appendix e2) 2.5 SWOT AnalysisStrength Weakness  Favorable geographical characteristics.  Jute can be cultivated only once in a year.  Availability of sufficient labor force.  Poor rate of return in terms per ton of production. (See Table : Appendix f)Opportunity Threat  Increasing demand of Jute.  Water pollution occurs during retting.  Possibility of flourishment for cottage  Production process largely dependent on industries. nature.  Close proximity to Dhaka. 6|Page
  • 7. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio2.6 Promoting StrategyAgricultural  Supply of high yielding seed and fertilizer like India and China.  Modern technology like ‘Fibre Extractor Machine’ to reduce labour cost.  Efficient use of water for retting. (See Figure : Appendix f)Economic  Ensure proper selling price of the jute : The difference in the Mill price and the price that farmers actually get should be minimized. The rational selling price of the Jute should be ensured to give security to the farmers investment or capital.  Market development initiatives : Exploring new market in different parts of the world through trade fair or business fair. Signing contracts with the neighboring countries for duty free entrance of the Jute based products.  Increasement of local use and strict rules on the use of polythene : Local use of the Jute based products should be increased in a greater amount. In India 100% of their total jute production is consumed locally. India further exports from the other coountries for their use. In Bangladesh the use of Jute as a substitute for Polythene should be raised both Publicly and Privately.Financial  Providing monetary grant in Jute Sector like Leather Industry : The leather sector receives near about 17% monetary garnt from the government on their total export amount. Same kind of facilities can also arranged for promoting Jute export.  Simple interset loan facilitiies.  Premium facility for high quality fibre : High buying price for the good grade fibres should be offered from the Mills to encourage good quality fibre production. 7|Page
  • 8. PLAN 434 Regional Planning StudioPhysical Infrastructure  Jute Mill establishment in Shariyatpur : From the location map of the Jute Mills (Appendix-e1) in Bangladesh we can see that there is no Jute Mill in Shariatpur. Couple of Mills can be established in Shariatpur to reduce the transport cost.  Improved transort facility with the Chittagong and Mongla Sea Port and Narayangonj Industrial Area. (See Map : Appendix e2)  Research institute at Shariyatpur : A sub-station of Bangladesh Jute Research Institute (BJRI) is proposed in Shariatpur to research and develop the quality of the total production process. (See Figure : Appendix g)Chapter 03: Promoting Sweetmeat Production in Rajbari District3.1 Sweetmeat ProfileSweetmeats occupy an important place in the diet of Bengalis and at their social ceremonies.It is an ancient custom among Hindus to distribute sweets at pujas. Sweets are also distributedat the end of Muslim milads. Traditionally, Bengalis distribute sweets among neighbours andrelatives on a variety of occasions such as births, engagements, weddings, success inexaminations etc. Because Bengali sweets are made from curd, they form an important part ofthe daily diet. The sweetmeat industry has flourished because of its close links with socialand religious ceremonies. Competition and changing tastes have helped to create many newsweets, and today this industry has grown not only within the country but has also spreadabroad.In addition to home-made sweets, Bengalis also buy sweetmeats prepared by mairas, orsweetmeat makers. Unlike northern Indian and Pakistani sweetmeats which are made of ksir(thickened milk), Bengali sweetmeats are made from curdled milk. The discovery of theprocess of curdling milk dates back to the Middle Ages. This discovery revolutionized thesweet culture of Bengalis. Since the 16th century, Bengali sweets were used in abundance bythe Vaishnavas as they were vegetarian. Various methods are used to make sweets attractiveand tasty. For instance, cassia leaves, cardamom powder, raisins, cashew nuts and orange rindare used for flavour, variety, and decoration. Different colours are also used. Various mouldsare used to give attractive designs and shapes to sweets, especially Swandesh a form ofsweetened cottage cheese. 8|Page
  • 9. PLAN 434 Regional Planning StudioIn Bangladesh today, Porabari in Tangail is famous for Chamcham, Muktagachha inMymensingh for Manda, Comilla for Pyada and Rasmalai, Faridpur for Malaikari, Natorefor Kanchagolla, Rajbari for Swandesh and Dhaka for Amrti, Jilipi and Pranhara.(Source: Banglapedia; Sweetmeats)3.2 Reasons for Sweetmeat Promotion  Cultural factor and festive demand: Sweet has always been a magnificent part of celebration for every Bangladeshi. A highly enriched culture provides this country a handful of festivals to celebrate. Sweet is one of the most common and popular festive food. Distributing sweets among friends and family during cultural festivals like Pahela Boishakh, Pahela Falgun, Eid, Durga Puja and many more occasions is very common here. Moreover any kind of occasions like marriage ceremony, birthday, milad mahfil also consumes sweet product. Sweet has become a significant part of the Bengali culture.  Locally huge demand and possibility of exporting: Local demand of sweet throughout the country has always encouraged the production of sweetmeat. In every shop in Bangladesh the highest sweet product consumption demand arises at the time of publishing the result of different School Certificate Exams like- HSC, SSC exams. Thousands of Bengali lives abroad in different countries all around the world. They are always willing to have the taste of sweet produced by Bangladeshi, traditional producers. All these markets are untapped and have a high potential to be a big market for Bangladeshi sweet products. Moreover sub-continent sweet products have a lot of demand among foreign nationalities and we can have a great opportunity to export quality sweet abroad.3.3 Rajbari ProfileRajbari District (Dhaka division) with an area of 1118.8 sq km, is bounded by Pabna districton the North, Faridpur and Magura districts on the South, Manikganj district on the East,Kushtia and Jhenaidah districts on the West. Main rivers besides the Padma (Ganges) areJalangi, Kumar, Gorai-Madhumati, Harai and Chandana. Annual average temperature:maximum 35.8°C and minimum 12.6°C; annual rainfall 2105 mm. 9|Page
  • 10. PLAN 434 Regional Planning StudioTotal Population is 940360. Average literacy rate is 26.4%. Main crops are Paddy, Jute,Sugarcane, Turmeric, Ground nut, Oil Seeds, Pulses. Total no. of dairy farms in Rajbari is259. Main exports are Sugarcane, Ground Nut, Vegetables, and Jute.(Source: Banglapedia; Rajbari District) (See Map of Rajbari: Appendix h)3.4 Reasons for Promoting Sweetmeat in Rajbari  Highest LQ Value and Traditionally Renowned Area: Rajbari district is situated at slightly west side of Bangladesh. It is very close to capital Dhaka. It is traditionally renowned area for Sweetmeat production. This district has the highest LQ (318.676) value for Sweetmeat production. This means the ratio of Sweetmeat production in Rajbari is higher than the ratio of sweetmeat production in National Level. That is why Rajbari can be taken as a landmark for sweetmeat production. (See Table and Map : Appendix h-1, i)  Preferable Location in terms of Raw Materials: The main ingredients like Milk, Sugar, and Wheat also have a high National LQ value in and among the close region of Rajbari. To be specific, Milk is produced in a greater amount in Pabna and Sirajganj, which are just beside Rajbari. It has some adjacent districts which have moderately high LQ value for Sugar production. Faridpur, Jessore, Jhinaidaha, having a good level of Sugar production can play a great role in prospect of Sweetmeat in Rajbari. Wheat production has high LQ value in Magura, Rajbari, Pabna and Meherpur; which is very influential for Sweetmeat production. Considering all these aspects, it can be said that Rajbari is now the most preferable location for Sweetmeat production in terms of raw material. (See Figure: Appendix j) 10 | P a g e
  • 11. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio 3.5 SWOT AnalysisStrength Weakness  Availability of the raw materials.  Perishable nature of the Sweetmeat.  Traditional skilled labor.  Seasonal variation in demand.  Highest LQ value among the country.Opportunity Threat  Close proximity to capital city Dhaka.  Occupation switching by the traditional workers for better earning.  Suitable location for supplying all over the country.  Sweetmeat shop with false brand name.  Flourishment as an export oriented area. 3.6 Promoting Strategy Infrastructure Policy  Increasing the no. of “Dairy Farms” in Pabna ,Sirajgonj and Rajbari.  Promoting “Sugar Mill” in Jhenaidah and Faridpur.  Establishing “Wheat Industry” (Roller Mill) in Rajbari, Magura and Pabna.  Better transport facility – to bring the raw materials from the nearby areas.  Building quick distribution network with Dhaka – to catch the greater market and for exporting because Sweetmeat is a perishable good. (See Figure: Appendix j)  Vocational centre/ Training centre - for Sweetmeat workers. Economic Policy  Loan facilities – for raw materials and better freezing option. As sweet is a product which needs proper storage in freezer to maintain the quality, a specific amount of loan should be sanctioned to the registered traders for freezing support. 11 | P a g e
  • 12. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio  Strictly maintain the “Copyright” for the name of the sweetmeat shop. Policy should be taken and implemented to maintain the name of the sweetmeat shop authentic. For example, naming a sweet meat shop “Rajbari Swandesh” will be strictly prohibited if the shop actually does not sell Swandesh of Rajbari. Proper authority will be liable for this type of abuse which actually affects a lot in sweet meat sale.Marketing Policy:  Sweetmeat fair in home and abroad during festivals – will serve the promotional works of different varieties. A large variety of Sweetmeat already exists in our country. To promote different varieties of sweet meats, Sweetmeat fair can be organized during festivals both inside the country and in abroad which will serve the promotional works of different varieties.  Establishing a “Sweetmeat Center” in Dhaka – all varieties of the country under one roof. This will help people to know a lot about the enriched variety of sweets and will also give them opportunity to taste the original traditional sweets.Chapter 04: ConclusionIn this study promotional strategy for two agricultural products at district (Regional) level isdiscussed. Scopes and limitations are analyzed based on some limited data and selectedfeatures. Detail process for the promotion of that particular product is not carried out for thelimitation of time and scope of the study; but this study can be treated as a general and simpleguideline for further study about the promotion of agricultural product at regional level. 12 | P a g e
  • 13. References: 1. Rahman R. A.K.M.; Jute in South Asia; International Jute Organization, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 2. Common Fund for Commodities (April, 2006).Technical Paper No. 44: A Road Map for Jute; International Jute Study Group, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 3. Moazzem G.K.;Rahman T.M. and Sobhan A. (January, 2009). Jute Manufacturing Sector of Bangladesh Challenges, Opportunities and Policy Options: Paper 78; ISSN 1818-1570 (Print), ISSN 1818-1597 (Online); Center for Policy Dialogue, Dhanmondi, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 4. Banglapedia; Jute. URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/J_0135.HTM 5. Banglapedia; Shariatpur District URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/S_0306.HTM 6. Banglapedia; Sweetmeat. URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/S_0640.HTM 7. Banglapedia; Rajbari District URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/R_0066.HTM 8. Shariatpur Zilla Profile (Agricultural), 2007, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Dhaka. URL:http://www.bbs.gov.bd/RptZillaProfile.aspx 9. Rajbari Zilla Profile (Agricultural), 2007, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Dhaka. URL: http://www.bbs.gov.bd/RptZillaProfile.aspx 10. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Bangladesh Data Sheet. URL: http://www.bbs.gov.bd/WebTestApplication/userfiles/SubjectMatterDataIndex/datasheet.xls 11. Bangladesh Bank, Commodity Wise Export Receipts. URL: http://www.bangladesh-bank.org/ 12. Central Research Institute for Jute & Allied Fibers, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Kolkata, India. URL: http://www.crijaf.org.in/side_menu/engineering.html#3 13. Bangladesh Jute Research Institute, Dhaka. URL: http://www.bjri.gov.bd/ 14. Bangladesh Jute Mill Corporation, Motijheel, Dhaka. URL: http://www.bjmc.gov.bd/ 15. Bangladesh Jute Spinners Association, Dhaka. URl: : http://www.juteyarn-bjsa.org/home.htm 16. International Jute Study Group, Dhaka. URL: http://www.jute.org/
  • 14. Appendix (a) Source: Rahman R. A.K.M.; Jute in South Asia; International Jute Organization, Dhaka.Source: Common Fund for Commodities (2005).Technical Paper No. 44: A Road Map for Jute; International Jute Study Group, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
  • 15. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (b). Figure: Map of Shariatpur District Source: Banglapedia; Shariatpur District URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/S_0306.HTM Geographical Characteristics of Shariyatpur. Criteria Favourable for Jute Production In Shariyatpur Temparature 18˚-33˚C Annual Averege 35.8˚C Rainfall Annualy more than 1500 mm Annually 2105mm Soil Type Clay to Sandy Loam Mainly Clay and Mix Type Source: Banglapedia; Jute and Shariatpur District. URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/J_0135.HTM URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/S_0306.HTM 15 | P a g e
  • 16. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (c) SI No Name of Items Area (Acre) Production (M.Ton) 1 Wheat 7,053 21,273 2 Tobaco 180 1,677 3 Fish catch 5,200 7,543 4 Onion 2,183 5,270 5 Sugar 0 27 6 Rich 79,982 208,617 7 Eggs 53 206 8 Milk 0 1,459 9 Pulse 6,514 4,918 10 Sugar Cane 504 619 11 Sweet Meat 0 3,398 12 Vegetable 7,538 12,528 13 Jute 40,839 72,157 14 Turmaric 46 261 15 Garlic 1,402 2,571 Table: Agricultural Production of ShariatpurSource: Shariatpur Zilla Profile (Agricultural), 2007, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Dhaka. URL:http://www.bbs.gov.bd/RptZillaProfile.aspx Location Quotient Values of Jute Production According to Districts Location Quotient(Production) Location Quotient(Production Rate) District LQ Value District LQ Value Bandarban 0.000 Bogra 0.010 Barguna 0.000 Barisal 0.037 Bogra 0.000 Meherpur 0.183 Khagrachari 0.000 Khagrachari 0.307 Patuakhali 0.000 Jhenaidah 0.441 Sylhet 0.000 Lalmonirhat 0.571 Kishoreganj 0.009 Chandpur 1.314 Sunamganj 0.060 Faridpur 1.459 Jhenaidah 0.079 Barguna 1.482 Pirojpur 0.093 Gopalganj 1.510 Khulna 0.185 Shariatpur 1.519 Rangamati 0.189 Sylhet 1.714Brahmanbaria 0.201 Dinajpur 2.108 Narsingdi 0.216 Bagerhat 2.357Narayanganj 0.230 Jessore 2.929 Bagerhat 0.232 Pabna 3.697 Bhola 0.305 Kushtia 5.242 Jhalokati 0.333 Khulna 6.060Mymensingh 0.413 Bhola 8.454 Dhaka 0.673 Brahmanbaria 9.487 Comilla 1.326 Tangail 10.684 16 | P a g e
  • 17. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Habiganj 1.637 Comilla 13.270 Location Quotient(Production) Location Quotient(Production Rate) District LQ Value District LQ Value Netrokona 1.654 Jamalpur 14.062Manikgonj 1.857 Pirojpur 14.794Munshiganj 2.035 Thakurgaon 15.417 Faridpur 4.733 Bandarban 16.169 Gazipur 5.182 Natore 16.325 Dinajpur 7.363 Dhaka 17.851 Joypurhat 7.872 Patuakhali 18.144 Sirajganj 8.222 Kishoreganj 18.900Chuadanga 9.470 Narsingdi 18.968 Gaibandha 14.734 Manikgonj 23.662 Kushtia 15.917 Sirajganj 24.260 Narail 19.297 Satkhira 24.947 Chandpur 20.832 Munshiganj 25.627 Barisal 20.872 Chuadanga 27.992 Jamalpur 31.937 Gazipur 28.378 Sherpur 32.725 Habiganj 28.679Nilphamari 32.973 Mymensingh 29.038 Tangail 37.923 Jhalokati 33.273 Satkhira 38.583 Rangamati 35.139 Jessore 39.748 Coxs Bazar 41.111 Gopalganj 39.945 Chittagong 44.194 Pabna 42.269 Feni 60.402Thakurgaon 42.568 Noakhali 176.779 Rangpur 45.787 Lakshmipur 193.966 Natore 50.138 Narayanganj 582.183 Kurigram 68.216 GaibandhaLalmonirhat 84.167 Joypurhat Rajbari 152.625 Kurigram Magura 166.520 Madaripur Meherpur 172.722 Magura Madaripur 264.591 Maulvibazar Shariatpur 313.678 NaogaonChittagong NarailCoxs Bazar Nawabganj Feni NetrokonaLakshmipur NilphamariMaulvibazar Panchagarh Naogaon RajbariNawabganj Rajshahi Noakhali RangpurPanchagarh Sherpur Rajshahi Sunamganj 17 | P a g e
  • 18. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (d1)Figure: LQ (Production) Map of Jute Production According to Districts. 18 | P a g e
  • 19. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (d2)Figure: LQ (Production Rate) Map of Jute Production According to Districts. 19 | P a g e
  • 20. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (e1)Figure: Location of the Jute Mills in Bangladesh. 20 | P a g e
  • 21. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (e2)Figure: LQ (Production) Map with Jute Mills Location 21 | P a g e
  • 22. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (e3)Figure: LQ (Production Rate) Map with Jute Mills Location 22 | P a g e
  • 23. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (f)Criteria Rice JuteYield per hectare 2 tons 1.2 -1.5 tonsLabor 145 man/day/ton 215 man/day/tonPer Quintal Selling Price 1100 tk. 1200 tk. Table: Comparison between Rice and Jute in terms of production factors and rate of return. Source: Common Fund for Commodities (2005).Technical Paper No. 44: A Road Map for Jute; International Jute Study Group, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Figure: Retting of Jute by Efficient Use of Water Figure: Fiber Extractor. Source: Central Research Institute for Jute & Allied Fibers, Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Kolkata, India. URL: http://www.crijaf.org.in/side_menu/engineering.html#3 23 | P a g e
  • 24. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (g) Figure: Proposed Jute Research Institute in Shariatpur Source: Bangladesh Jute Research Institute, Dhaka.URL: http://www.bjri.gov.bd/DIFFERENT%20RESEARCH%20STATION.HTM 24 | P a g e
  • 25. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (h) Figure: Map of Rajbari District Source: Banglapedia; Rajbari District URL: http://www.banglapedia.org/httpdocs/HT/R_0066.HTM SI No Name of Items Area (acre) Production (M.Ton) 1 Wheat 35,450 22,163 2 Tobaco 1,850 43,333 3 Fish catch 6,008 7,004 4 Onion 25,717 73,119 5 Rich 146,251 190,596 6 Eggs 0 4,304 7 Milk 0 231 8 Pulse 18,871 10,637 9 Sugar Cane 12,384 175,254 10 Sweet Meat 120 42,684 11 Vegetable 8,762 25,850 12 Jute 37,630 64,210 13 Turmaric 581 1,071 14 Garlic 5,476 6,242 Table: Agricultural Production of RajbariSource: Rajbari Zilla Profile (Agricultural), 2007, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, Dhaka. URL: http://www.bbs.gov.bd/RptZillaProfile.aspx 25 | P a g e
  • 26. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (h-1) Location Quotient Values of Sweetmeat Production According to Districts Location Quotient(Production) Location Quotient(Production Rate) District Jute District Jute Bogra 0.000 Pirojpur 0.005 Kishoreganj 0.010 Kishoreganj 0.010 Jhenaidah 0.020 Kushtia 0.952Brahmanbaria 0.091 Khulna 1.056Mymensingh 0.140 Narsingdi 1.428 Nilphamari 0.181 Sylhet 1.544 Joypurhat 0.198 Barisal 2.046 Chuadanga 0.223 Lalmonirhat 2.173 Narayanganj 0.233 Manikgonj 2.438 Pirojpur 0.342 Natore 2.511 Narsingdi 0.488 Faridpur 2.939 Kurigram 0.555 Kurigram 5.068 Khulna 0.572 Sunamganj 5.077 Munshiganj 0.607 Jessore 6.217 Sylhet 1.069 Magura 6.226 Sunamganj 1.090 Sirajganj 10.147 Shatkhira 1.116 Brahmanbaria 13.713 Faridpur 1.224 Bagerhat 20.554 Jessore 1.311 Pabna 21.805 Jhalokati 1.416 Dhaka 23.634 Sherpur 1.872 Rangpur 27.972 Bandarban 2.298 Barguna 33.058 Lalmonirhat 2.353 Patuakhali 33.799 Kushtia 2.637 Bandarban 40.964 Manikgonj 2.682 Comilla 48.419 Dhaka 3.547 Chandpur 72.739 Jamalpur 3.844 Gazipur 114.345 Barisal 4.361 Tangail 143.772 Thakurgaon 4.387 Munshiganj 150.648 Magura 4.525 Rajbari 502.777 Netrokona 5.124 Khagrachari 2,888.696 Rangpur 5.484 Habiganj 4,041.137 Dinajpur 6.429 Bhola Comilla 6.494 Bogra Narail 6.759 Chittagong Gazipur 6.850 Chuadanga Natore 7.250 Coxs Bazar Bhola 8.957 Dinajpur Barguna 9.003 Feni Gaibandha 9.837 Gaibandha Khagrachari 11.042 Gopalganj 26 | P a g e
  • 27. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Location Quotient(Production) Location Quotient(Production) District Jute District JuteMadaripur 12.986 Jamalpur Meherpur 13.522 Jhalokati Chandpur 14.076 JhenaidahRangamati 16.793 Joypurhat Habiganj 18.153 Lakshmipur Tangail 18.335 Madaripur Sirajganj 22.954 Maulvibazar Bagerhat 41.927 Meherpur Shariatpur 46.397 Mymensingh Patuakhali 84.316 Naogaon Gopalganj 175.230 Narail Pabna 209.691 Narayanganj Rajbari 318.676 NawabganjChittagong NetrokonaCoxs Bazar Nilphamari Feni NoakhaliLakshmipur PanchagarhMaulvibazar Rajshahi Naogaon RangamatiNawabganj Shariatpur Noakhali ShatkhiraPanchagarh Sherpur Rajshahi Thakurgaon 27 | P a g e
  • 28. PLAN 434 Regional Planning StudioAppendix (i) 28 | P a g e
  • 29. PLAN 434 Regional Planning Studio Appendix (j)Figure: Preferable Zones for supply of Raw Materials for Sweetmeat Production in Rajbari. Figure: Infrastructure Policy Sweetmeat Production. 29 | P a g e

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