Social Media AND THE Enterprise Business Intelligence/Analytics Connection

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A 2010 study conducted by Seth Grimes.

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Social Media AND THE Enterprise Business Intelligence/Analytics Connection

  1. 1. BeyeNETWORK Custom Research Report Social Media AND THEEnterprise Business Intelligence/ Analytics Connection THE CORPORATE-SOCIAL CONNECTIONBI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE THE STUDY STUDY FINDINGS By Seth Grimes, Alta Plana Corporation 1
  2. 2. IntroductionINTRODUCTION S THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION OCIAL IS AT WORK, enterprise concerns. in the home, and just For years, enterprises have looked BI AND THE about everywhere else, to business intelligence (BI) tech- SOCIAL ENTERPRISE literally, given the rise niques and solutions to deliver of mobile devices and near-global insights on customer interactions wireless telephone and Internet and corporate performance, yet THE STUDY access. We capture experiences and mainstream business intelligence, interactions—personal and com- designed to operate on transac- mercial—in video, photos, and mes- tional and operational data main-STUDY FINDINGS sages and status updates, as well as in forms that now seem old—email, blogs, online news, and docu- ABOUT THE ments—and we share this electronic Social networks contain AUTHOR record with contacts, extended immense business value social networks, and often anyone for the spectrum of who cares to look. It is obvious that social net- enterprise concerns. works—our connections across social platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn—and tained in enterprise data ware- the messages we exchange—status houses and analytical databases, is updates, retweets, videos, email, ill-equipped to deal with the torrent blogs—contain immense business of enterprise-relevant social infor- value for marketing, customer expe- mation. Tools are evolving, however, rience, product design, quality, serv- to bring social data to enterprise ice planning and provisioning, com- analyses; to front-line existing ana- pliance and fraud: the spectrum of lytical data stores to support social- COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 2
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION platform customer engagement; to with their business missions while permit social sharing of BI and net- others appear not to have deter- worked, collaborative BI; and even to mined a best way forward. The expose enterprise data resources for latter point perhaps explains non- community and partner use. In integration, to date, of social data or short, we’re seeing a socialization of methods in BI analyses. Nonethe-INTRODUCTION data and a socialization of business less, early enterprise social-BI intelligence. adopters have valuable guidance The trend is clear, toward Social BI. to share. THE To keep up, we—users, solution CORPORATE- SOCIAL providers, and industry watchers— CONNECTION need to understand the type and Social is the fastest- extent of adoption, to understand growing source of recent, current, and likely future BI AND THE market directions. To that end, this enterprise analytical SOCIAL ENTERPRISE study, Social Media and the Enterprise data. BI-Analytics Connection, was con- ducted through TechTarget’s THE STUDY BeyeNETWORK in July-September Social is the fastest-growing 2010. source of enterprise analytical data; Findings provide a benchmark for social approaches are alteringSTUDY FINDINGS Social BI. Individuals are using social enterprise work practices; social platforms for both personal and pro- channels, with engagement fessional purposes—this much is informed by analytics, are changing ABOUT THE obvious—and enterprises, while how corporations interact with cus- AUTHOR they have been “listening” to social tomers and the public. BI and ana- chatter, have been slow to build out lytics are adapting to a social world, official social presences or to incor- creating competitive advantage for porate social-derived data or social enterprises that embrace the Social methods into BI analyses. Some see BI vision. Study findings suggest little social-presence correlation how.p COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 3
  4. 4. The Corporate-Social ConnectionINTRODUCTION T THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION HE ONLINE SOCIAL encompasses employees, business world is comprised of partners, customers, and the public, BI AND THE networkers making con- interacting via a wide variety of tra- SOCIAL ENTERPRISE nections and exchang- ditional and electronic touchpoints. ing messages via social platforms. This is a very expansive view of the The corporation is a social plat- social enterprise. It sees as artificial THE STUDY form. Old-style organization charts the distinction between in-person position the internal corporate and online customer and stake- players while interconnections are holder interactions.STUDY FINDINGS defined by in-person, telephone, instant-messaging, and email exchanges as well as by information BUSINESS INFORMATION ABOUT THE sharing via intranets and document- AND ANALYTICS AUTHOR management systems and on paper. Whether interactions are facilitated (Decades of knowledge manage- by and recorded in a customer ment initiatives have tried and failed relationship management (CRM) to map information holdings and system, or whether they are (often flows, perhaps because knowledge undetected and not responded to) management has always been online forum postings, they gener- perceived as a cost center that has ate potentially valuable business never been aligned with revenue- information. If the right data can be producing activities.) recorded and produced, the busi- Add outward-facing elements— ness information can be understood, storefronts, websites, contact cen- and interactions and larger scale ters, sales organizations, marketing strategy can be optimized, via and public relations—and you have analytics. a picture of a social enterprise that What information? COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 4
  5. 5. THE CORPORATE-SOCIAL CONNECTION Social participants are individuals anonymously (or close to it), for and organizations. They may be instance, on consumer review sites. identified by a screen name or, in the Some participation is public, on case of online forums, they may be Twitter or open forums, while other anonymous although potentially participation, such as text messag- describable via clues drawn from ing, is private or narrowcast to a lim-INTRODUCTION ited audience. Extending an old say- ing, content is king, but context and connections provide the power THE Content is king, but behind the throne. CORPORATE- SOCIAL context and connections We have, in sum, a dynamic, ever- evolving social graph that includes: CONNECTION provide the power. pNodes: People and organizations BI AND THE pEdges: Connections SOCIAL ENTERPRISE their postings and potentially trace- pFlows: How the network is used able, by both the social-platform pContent: The genie in the bottle, host and third-party services, via IP the reason for, and the source of THE STUDY addresses captured in web-server greatest business value, in social logs, web-browser cookies, and web media beacons embedded in viewed pages.STUDY FINDINGS Where there’s a screen name, How do we unlock social’s busi- there’s a greater possibility of trac- ness value? ing social activities over time, and ABOUT THE there’s a likelihood of access to an AUTHOR associated profile that may include SOCIAL BUSINESS ANALYTICS name, age, sex, email address, and Social business analytics can be short bio. But profile information is defined as the study of each aspect often closely held by the platform of the social graph in an attempt to provider and shared only with the discover business-relevant insights. user’s social-platform friends. Social business analytics may Some social participants want to include a number of practices. be found, especially on platforms Search and “listening” allow busi- designed to provide information nesses to better understand current openly, such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and prospective customers and public forums, and public blogs. other stakeholders. Further, by Some social participants are selling understanding how stakeholder- themselves and their expertise— participants are interconnected, and think LinkedIn—while others post how messages propagate through COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 5
  6. 6. THE CORPORATE-SOCIAL CONNECTION social networks, across social plat- formance indicators that go beyond forms, businesses will improve their social-only quantities such as num- ability to hear and reach stakehold- ber of friends, followers, and likes; ers and build communities. By number of retweets, page views, and studying social content, businesses comments; and number, nature, and will better understand both stake- growth of online company andINTRODUCTION holder needs and interests, and also brand mentions. These are interest- issues and concerns. ing and useful quantities, but only in Social business analytics allows THE organizations to hear and respond CORPORATE- SOCIAL to what’s called the voice of the cus- Social business analytics CONNECTION tomer, complementing and extend- ing conventional, BI-reliant tech- allows organizations to niques that support: hear and respond to the BI AND THE SOCIAL voice of the customer. ENTERPRISE pProduct design pQuality initiatives pCustomer service and support THE STUDY pMarketing, advertising, and public exceptional cases do they represent relations revenue-generating enterprise out- pCompetitive intelligence comes. Visibility, extent of network,STUDY FINDINGS pProspecting and lead generation and mindshare don’t generate profit: sales and cost savings do. Social enterprises collect and ana- Analysis of measured revenues ABOUT THE lyze social data to support business and expenses as recorded in enter- AUTHOR operations and decision making, yet prise operational systems has until operations, and customer interac- now—prior to the emergence of tions, are rarely limited to, or even online, social computing—been the primarily focused on, social plat- province of enterprise business forms. For this reason, we need to intelligence initiatives. Naturally, a consider a more complete definition next step is to extend enterprise BI of the social enterprise and the role to encompass social interactions, BI can and should play, and we need data, metrics, indicators, outcomes to consider metrics and key per- and also social methods: Social BI.p COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 6
  7. 7. BI and the Social EnterpriseINTRODUCTION E THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION NTERPRISES NEAR UNI- analysis, and visualization via a vari- versally look to busi- ety of tools that include spread- BI AND THE ness intelligence to sheets, reports, dashboards, “cube” SOCIAL ENTERPRISE support operational, views, and graphics. Conventional BI tactical, and strategic decision mak- capabilities are delivered via desk- ing, to optimize sales, marketing, top and web interfaces and, in THE STUDY manufacturing and logistics, finan- recent years, by progressive solution cial management, customer service, providers, via mobile devices. and a host of other functions and Conventional BI has been slow,STUDY FINDINGS initiatives. Many of these applica- however, to embrace unconven- tions rely on information drawn tional data and sources: network from corporate transactional and data, text and rich media, click- ABOUT THE operational systems, information streams and other high-velocity AUTHOR about current and potential cus- data. Even uptake of location and tomers, business partners, and time-series analytics—the ability to other stakeholders, in addition to crunch geospatial and time-varying information generated by internal data—has been slow despite rapidly business processes. growing data availability, accelerat- ing with the proliferation of sensors and mobile devices. BI BOUNDARIES The picture is changing, however, BI draws primarily on structured as BI evolves to cover unconven- databases and data files—on data tional data sources that enable warehouses, data marts, operational enterprises to: databases, and also spreadsheets and flat files. Conventional BI sup- pBring social data to enterprise ports data access, exploration, analyses, COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 7
  8. 8. BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE pFront-line existing analytical data The premise is that, for instance, stores to support social-platform the volume and tone of online brand customer engagement, mentions, and in particular senti- pPermit social sharing of BI and net- ment attached to product and serv- worked, collaborative BI, and ice features, are linked to design and pExpose enterprise data resources quality, customer service, marketingINTRODUCTION for community and partner use. THE SOCIAL-ENTERPRISE We need to understand CORPORATE- SOCIAL COMMON GROUND where and how to join CONNECTION A first step toward Social BI should analyses, creating be to find online and enterprise common ground. Consider the insights uniquely enabled BI AND THE questions: What online information by an enterprise-social SOCIAL ENTERPRISE can improve enterprise outcomes, bridge. and where can that information be found? Further, before we can THE STUDY assess possible social-enterprise analytical integration points, we and advertising reach and effective- need to understand what insights ness, and other managed, data-gen-STUDY FINDINGS organizations are already deriving erating business processes, and that from social data. (Study readers are we can generate analytical lift— very likely already familiar with the more complete, accurate, and useful ABOUT THE application of BI to derive business results—when we extend analyses. AUTHOR insights from conventional enter- A further step, beyond data, met- prise information sources, from data rics, and analyses, is to explore how collected in transactional and opera- analytical methods can be improved tional systems.) And we need to via the adoption of social practices understand where and how to join that include sharing, collaboration, analyses, creating insights uniquely and community building. enabled by an enterprise-social These points, these needs, are bridge. considered in this study.p COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 8
  9. 9. The StudyINTRODUCTION T THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION HE BALANCE of this 5. How does your organization track report covers the study social-media mentions of its brands, BI AND THE done to elicit views competition, and/or concerns? SOCIAL ENTERPRISE about the themes Choose [from a list of business uses]. explored to this point. The study consisted of a survey conducted 6. How does your organization THE STUDY between late July and mid-Septem- quantify the value of its social pres- ber 2011. The questionnaire had ence? Choose one or more [of a list twenty-one questions as follows. of approaches].STUDY FINDINGS (Response options are not shown here but will be listed in the Study 7. How important or beneficial is Findings section that follows.) having an official, organizational ABOUT THE social-media presence? AUTHOR 1. Does your organization use offi- cial corporate accounts or pages on 8. Does your organization use a [any of a list of social platforms]? social-media listening or analytics platform, that is, services (usually 2. Does your organization use, inter- hosted software) that, in their basic nally, a non-public [social platform]? forms, allow you to track and com- pute statistics for keywords men- 3. Which of the following [list of] tioned on social platforms? public/community platforms do you, personally, use for work purposes? 9. If your organization uses a social- media listening or analytics plat- 4. Does your organization use social form, how useful or effective is it? media, externally, for [any of a list of business needs]? 10. Does your organization use web COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 9
  10. 10. THE STUDY analytics software, that is, allowing ing, and public relations, social you to track and compute statistics and traditional. for use of your own websites? pOnline monitoring and analysis, of brand mentions, for competi- 11. Does your organization use busi- tive intelligence and market ness intelligence (BI) software, soft- research.INTRODUCTION ware that supports analysis of opera- pAll forms of BI and analytics. tional and transactional data to pCustomer/product support via support business decision making? social/online platforms (“Social THE CRM”). CORPORATE- SOCIAL 12. Does your organization’s BI soft- pTotal customer/product support CONNECTION ware allow users to post BI objects— via all touchpoints. reports, tables, charts or other visual- izations—online to blogs, web pages? 17. What are the top three benefits BI AND THE you see in incorporating social data SOCIAL ENTERPRISE 13. What “signals” would your organ- in BI analyses? ization like to derive from social media, or match to social-media post- 18. What are the top three biggest THE STUDY ings, that you currently can’t? challenges you see in incorporating social data in BI analyses? 14. Does your organization’s BI soft-STUDY FINDINGS ware support? 19. Comments? What are the most useful/lucrative aspects of combin- 15. Does your organization use text- ing social tools, data, and methods ABOUT THE analytics software or services, that and BI, and what are the pitfalls? AUTHOR is, to automate processing and What guidance would you offer to analysis of “natural language” or others? “unstructured data”? 20. What is your primary job function? 16. What is your best estimate of your organization’s July 2010 and 21. In what industry do you work? July 2011 monthly spending (U.S. dollars) on software, services and staff related to: METHODOLOGY AND TOOLS This survey should be considered pOnline presence, e.g., websites, qualitative, for heuristic purposes, official use of social media for an aid in a discovery process that customer engagement. will guide organizations in their pAll forms of marketing, advertis- social-BI implementations. COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 10
  11. 11. THE STUDYINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL FIGURE 1: Geographic Distribution of Respondents CONNECTION BI AND THE The sample design was not scien- those selections is not included in SOCIAL ENTERPRISE tific, not designed to provide a sta- the totals from which selection per- tistically accurate picture of the centages are computed. business population. No selection of The author did basic tabulations THE STUDY respondents was conducted, and and charts in Excel and further ana- qualifications or restrictions were lyzed survey responses with Super- placed on responses. Responses to CROSS, a data-analysis and visuali-STUDY FINDINGS questions about respondent back- zation tool, part of the SuperSTAR ground will help readers in under- suite from Space-Time Research of standing any skew seen in results. Melbourne, Australia (www.space- ABOUT THE TechTarget conducted the survey timeresearch.com). The author is AUTHOR with the SurveyGizmo online tool. grateful to STR for allowing use of There were 283 complete survey the software for this report. responses and 261 partial The author created many of the responses. The graphic above gives graphics in the following report sec- an idea of the geographic distribu- tion with ManyEyes, “An experi- tion of respondents as discerned by ment brought to you by IBM IP address. (Clearly the projection Research and the IBM Cognos soft- used misplaces, toward the equator, ware group” (http:/ /www- locations with high northern or 958.ibm.com/software/data/cog- southern latitude.) Analyses draw nos/manyeyes/visualizations/). on all 530 responses, but not on the ManyEyes is a free online tool that large number of abandoned survey allows the public to upload and ana- sessions. All questions included a lyze data and share visualizations.p “Don’t know” option; the count of COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 11
  12. 12. Study FindingsINTRODUCTION T THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION HE FOLLOWING is a pres- cial, corporate and personal use of entation of study find- social platforms, worded as follows BI AND THE ings and a number of with the number of responses SOCIAL ENTERPRISE conclusions. The survey (other than “Don’t Know”) in starts with basic questions, essen- [square brackets]: tially, Who’s using social media for THE STUDY business purposes and for what pur- Q1: Which of the following does your poses? Is business social-media use organization use official corporate worthwhile? It then asks about ana- accounts or pages on? [n=507]STUDY FINDINGS lytics use, both tied to social analy- ses and not, and about the business Q3: Which of the following insights that respondents (would) public/community platforms do you, ABOUT THE look to derive from social analyses. personally, use for work purposes? AUTHOR The remainder of the survey is qual- [n=529] See figure 2 for chart of itative, an exploration of top bene- responses. fits and challenges in Social BI and SEE FIGURE 2 FOR CHART OF RESPONSES. an invitation to respondents to pro- vide guidance drawn from experi- Interestingly, personal business ence. The Findings section con- blogging, Facebook, and Twitter use cludes with charts on respondent lags official, corporate business job function and industry. blogging, Facebook, and Twitter use. These questions were designed to baseline business social-platform BUSINESS USE OF SOCIAL utilization—a majority of respon- PLATFORMS: CORPORATE dents and of companies they repre- AND PERSONAL sent use social platforms—in con- A pair of questions contrasts offi- junction with a third question, which COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 12
  13. 13. Q STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 2: Use of Social Platforms THE STUDY looks at internal corporate use of BUSINESS SOCIAL APPLICATIONS social platforms: A variety of questions explore busi-STUDY FINDINGS ness social applications, as reported Q2: Which of the following does your in the section that follows. organization use internally ABOUT THE (not for public consumption)? Q4: Does your organization use AUTHOR [n=501] social media, externally, for …? SEE FIGURE 3 FOR CHART OF RESPONSES. [n=482] SEE FIGURE 4 FOR CHART OF RESPONSES. These are not impressive rates of internal social-platform use, but then These responses mix marketing it is understandable by anyone who and operational use cases, ones that has been watching enterprise “knowl- study social-media patterns and edge management” efforts, which ones that use social media as an after decades have not proved value engagement channel. The responses sufficient to prompted widespread do indicate a breadth of corporate enterprise adoption, that optional, ad social applications. That only one- hoc (rather than organized) corporate fifth of respondents report that their social communications would likely organizations do not use external be the rule for enterprises. social media is encouraging. COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 13
  14. 14. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL FIGURE 3: Internal Corporate Use of Social Platforms ENTERPRISE THE STUDYSTUDY FINDINGS ABOUT THE AUTHOR FIGURE 4: How Organizations Use Social Media Externally COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 14
  15. 15. STUDY FINDINGS How do organizations use social also involve studying social post- media? ings.) So the question arises, pThey may study what the public or Q5: How does your organization track stakeholders post to social plat- social-media mentions of its brands, forms. competition, and/or concerns?INTRODUCTION pThey may put out their own infor- [n=382] mation and wish to know what SEE FIGURE 5 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. reaction is engendered. THE pThey may engage on a one-to-one Brand and competitive tracking CORPORATE- SOCIAL basis, communicating privately should be seen as a form of busi- CONNECTION over social channels even if not ness intelligence, even though publicly. driven by unconventional data. (Conventional BI is draws from BI AND THE With 43.7% as reported in the enterprise operational and transac- SOCIAL ENTERPRISE chart in Figure 4, brand/reputation tional systems.) Now we consider management is the number one social presence, which describes reported use according to this study. organizational use of social plat- THE STUDY (Competitive intelligence research forms, whether for information dis- and lead generation/prospecting semination, community building, orSTUDY FINDINGS ABOUT THE AUTHOR FIGURE 5: Methods Used to Track Social-Media Mentions COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 15
  16. 16. STUDY FINDINGS QINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 6: How Social Presence is Quantified THE STUDY one-to-one engagement. These Further analysis shows, however, uses are operational in nature and that if we limit to respondents whoSTUDY FINDINGS the insights they generate, together currently use BI software that with the data collection and analysis extends analyses to social data, fully processes, should also be consid- 50% see having an official, organi- ABOUT THE ered BI. So we ask, zation social-media presence as AUTHOR extremely beneficial. Q6: How does your organization Two questions address the utiliza- quantify the value of its social tion and perceived effectiveness of presence? [n=397] social-media listening/analytics SEE FIGURE 6 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. platforms: Is a social-media presence—rates Q8: Does your organization use a and applications reported in Figure social-media listening or analytics 6—important? We ask, platform, that is, services (usually hosted software) that, in their basic Q7: How important or beneficial is forms, allow you to track and com- having an official, organizational pute statistics for keywords men- social-media presence? [n=488] tioned on social platforms? [n=287] SEE FIGURE 7 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. and COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 16
  17. 17. STUDY FINDINGS Q9: If your organization uses a 15%, and also awareness rates (over social-media listening or analytics 201 responded “Don’t know” and platform, how useful or effective is another hundred did not respond to it? [n=43] this question) are low. A count of 44 SEE FIGURE 8 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. responded that their organization is using a social-media listening or ana-INTRODUCTION As can be seen from Q8 lytics platform, and 43 of those 44 responses shown in Figure 8, both responded to Q9 with no negative utilization rates (as shown), at only experiences in their platform use. THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE THE STUDYSTUDY FINDINGS FIGURE 7: Importance of Having an Official, Organizational Social-Media Presence ABOUT THE AUTHOR FIGURE 8: Utilization and Perceived Effectiveness of Social-Media S S Listening/Analytics Platforms COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 17
  18. 18. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION FIGURE 9: Enterprise Analytics Use BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE Of the minority of respondents support business decision making? whose employer is using a social- [n=281] media listening or analytics plat- THE STUDY form, the vast majority see the plat- Fewer than half of organizations form as at least somewhat useful or use either web analytics or BI effective. according to responses. This figure isSTUDY FINDINGS surprising, particularly for BI, given that survey outreach relied heavily BUSINESS/WEB ANALYTICS on BeyeNETWORK channels. ABOUT THE UPTAKE AND THE SOCIAL LINK AUTHOR SEE FIGURE 9 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. Two questions look at enterprise analytics use—at web analytics and BI—including whether analytics is linked to social data. BI MODES Next we look at BI modes: whether Q10: Does your organization use web software supports online sharing, analytics software, that is, allowing what business “signals” organiza- you to track and compute statistics for tions (would) look for in social use of your own websites? [n=237] sources, and the extent of support by BI software used for extended Q11: Does your organization use busi- information types, text analytics in ness intelligence (BI) software, soft- particular. ware that supports analysis of opera- The first BI modes question—and tional and transactional data to the assumption is that respondents COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 18
  19. 19. STUDY FINDINGS QINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 10: Online Sharing of BI Objects THE STUDY have in mind BI on conventional do/would respondents seek in social sources, on operational and transac- sources?STUDY FINDINGS tional data—is: Q13: What “signals” would your organ- Q12: Does your organization’s BI soft- ization like to derive from social media, ABOUT THE ware allow users to post BI objects— or match to social-media postings, that AUTHOR reports, tables, charts or other visual- you currently can’t? [n=295] izations—online to blogs, web pages? SEE FIGURE 11 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. [n=283] SEE FIGURE 10 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. It is illuminating to look at rela- tionship ratios, crossing Q6 (X-axis, Forty-six percent of respondents across) and Q13 (Y-axis, down) are uninterested in online BI sharing! responses: which desired “signals” It is important to note that sharing is match disproportionately with the first step in online BI collabora- which methods of quantifying social tion, so by extension, close to half of media presence? respondents are not interested in The graphic shown in Figure 12 online BI collaboration. was produced with the SuperCROSS How would BI extend to online data analysis tool. Yellow cells have information? What business drivers a higher-than-expected relationship COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 19
  20. 20. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 11: Business Drivers Sought in Social Sources THE STUDY TSTUDY FINDINGS ABOUT THE AUTHOR FIGURE 12: Relationship Ratios COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 20
  21. 21. STUDY FINDINGS ratio and grey cells indicate lower- again, specific transaction or offline than-expected relationships. customer interaction. So we see, for instance, that: pAnd tellingly, organizations that don’t measure their social pres- pOrganizations that measure social ences would like to start withINTRODUCTION success by ”ability to respond to” socially posted “product or service and “resolve customer issues” dis- issues” and are least interested in proportionately prize being able to a more complicated signal, “spe- THE detect product and service issues cific transaction” or “offline cus- CORPORATE- SOCIAL and ability to find the specific tomer interaction.” CONNECTION transaction or offline customer interaction associated with a Moving on to the next question: social posting. BI AND THE Q14: Does your organization’s BI SOCIAL ENTERPRISE pOrganizations that measure social software support …? [n=378, 378, success by “ability to personalize 380] and localize” prioritize ability to SEE FIGURE 13 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. THE STUDY find “poster’s transaction history and lifetime value” and “product The list of BI vendors most or service issues.” frequently cited by respondents,STUDY FINDINGS both using solutions for social pOrganizations that measure media analyses (SMA) [n=41] or “response to social marketing cam- not [n=63], tabulates as shown ABOUT THE paigns” need signals that include in Figure 14. AUTHOR “poster’s intent” (e.g., to make a These figures roughly track BI purchase or product inquiry) and, vendor market shares as reported Q C urrently Do not us e Unknown Total us e Inclusion of social data in 13.5% 50.0% 36.5% 378 analyses Social-network analysis 14.0% 51.3% 34.7% 378 Social methods such as 17.6% 47.1% 35.3% 380 collaborative development of BI objects (reports, pivot tabl es, charts) FIGURE 13: Activities Supported by BI Software COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 21
  22. 22. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL FIGURE 14: BI Vendor Solutions used for Social Media Analysis ENTERPRISE by analyst firm surveys. (Note that a vidual or department use of text THE STUDY number of the Microsoft responses analytics within an organization are for back-end SQL Server Analy- may exist unknown to others in the T sis Services rather than for user- organization.STUDY FINDINGS facing BI interfaces.) So only a small The list of vendors/products pro- proportion of BI users are currently vided by respondents, whether bringing social data into their analy- using text analytics for social-media ABOUT THE ses, and those who are use tools analyses or not, was not useful for AUTHOR from their conventional BI providers. reporting purposes. The next question asked about text analytics, SPENDING SIGNALS Q15: Does your organization use text Spending—current and planned—is analytics software or services, that is, a strong indicator of true interest to automate processing and analysis and intent relating to an emerging of “natural language” or “unstruc- technology. Survey question Q16 tured data”? [n=249] effectively asked: To what extent SEE FIGURE 15 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. have you “put your money where your mouth is”? Here, 134 out of 383 responses were “Don’t know,” almost one- Q16: What is your best estimate third, so clearly awareness of indi- of your organization’s July 2010 and COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 22
  23. 23. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION FIGURE 15: Use of Text Analytics Software or Services BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE July 2011 monthly spending (U.S. T TOP 3 BENEFITS dollars) on software, services, and The following survey question— THE STUDY staff. Q17: What are the top three benefits Unfortunately, most of the 80 you see in incorporating social data inSTUDY FINDINGS responses were only partial, BI analyses? addressing some but not all or even most of Q line items, and the the —is that first of three that looks for ABOUT THE response characteristics render qualitative, textual responses. Our AUTHOR them not usable for analyses. analysis looks first at most frequently FIGURE 16: Most Frequently Used Words COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 23
  24. 24. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 17: Words Following "Understand" THE STUDY used words. In the graphic shown in TOP 3 CHALLENGES Figure 16, which was produced with We use another word cloud in Fig-STUDY FINDINGS IBM’s ManyEyes tool, size of the ure 19 to render free-form responses word corresponds to usage fre- to the following question: quency. Orientation (horizontal and ABOUT THE vertical), spatial arrangement, and Q18: What are the top three biggest AUTHOR font color are not relevant. challenges you see in incorporating Another ManyEyes visualization, social data in BI analyses? Figure 17, a word tree, shows the words that immediately follow the Again, responses speak for them- word “understand.” Graphical size selves. Challenges respondents see of the following words is in propor- include information content, analyti- tion to frequency of use: “customer” cal possibilities, cost, security, under- appears after “understand” four standing, handling of “unstructured” times and “what” appears three inputs, quality, value, and so on. times. The word net graphic, shown in Figure 18, a word net visualization Figure 20, explores concerns con- centering on “customer,” shows a nected to “social,” with significant network of related terms and con- subnets for “social data” and “social cepts. media.” COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 24
  25. 25. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 18: Terms and Concepts Related to "Customer" THE STUDY COMMENTS AND GUIDANCE Reservations There were many comments/ p[It’s] still early days for socialSTUDY FINDINGS responses to the following questions: BI—limited market, mainly for consumer-led apps. Q19: Comments? What are the most pI don’t believe it is worthwhile. ABOUT THE AUTHOR useful/lucrative aspects of combining pI have not come across a tool or social tools, data, and methods and BI, set of tools that can provide the and what are the pitfalls? What guid- functionality and quality reporting ance would you offer to others? to social media analytics and intelligence. The sections that follow group p[There is] too much information selected comments into a number sometimes. of categories and report them ver- pIt is accurate information, only batim, albeit edited to correct if you ask the right questions? spelling, make them more readable, p[It is difficult to obtain] action- and create an interpretation where able information correlating the language was ambiguous. social-network data with actual Vagaries in grammar were left in customer information. where they did not make meaning pWe are adopting a “wait and see” unclear. program, checking monthly on COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 25
  26. 26. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION FIGURE 19: Biggest Challenges BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE any new developments as they Pluses and Minuses reflect our goals. pThe main advantage would be that THE STUDY it gives you a full picture of inter- No reservations! nal and external data, which can pBeing able to reach more people. be analyzed together. The pitfall isSTUDY FINDINGS pTo be in touch with more cus- to put all this together and to filter tomers is the most lucrative it so it can be relevant and easy to aspects of all this process. use. ABOUT THE AUTHOR p[You benefit by] extending the pCan greatly increase the personal enterprise boundaries, the capa- level of relationship with cus- bility to include and engage cus- tomers/prospects/partners, and tomers and employees interac- facilitate greater understanding of tively for service improvement. our market. Takes some of the for- pIt is a must for today’s global mality and cost out of traditional market. marketing. The pitfalls are in relying pProducts [will be] more focused. on it too heavily, as these tools are pBI can gain a lot from social tools, not in global use; you are getting like sharing, bookmarking, “like,” just the segment that is active in etc. Additionally, social data can these arenas. I also tend to believe enhance BI data. that people participate more pReaching a large audience for free, actively when they have negative [but it is] hard to measure ROI. Go feedback, so that can skew the view for it! of public opinion. I say take it one COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 26
  27. 27. STUDY FINDINGSINTRODUCTION THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL CONNECTION BI AND THE SOCIAL ENTERPRISE FIGURE 20: Concerns Connected to "Social" THE STUDY step at a time, keep active with per- estimate can be drawn based on sonal face-to-face dialog with your historical data but can never be market, and trust your gut. projected as it is not certain or maySTUDY FINDINGS pBetter view of activity. Pitfalls: Pri- not persist forever. The main disad- vacy concerns. Develop a security vantage of using BI in product for plan first. social communication and online ABOUT THE AUTHOR pYou get an immediate return with- use is that we are streamlining the out a big budget. You can experi- taste or behavior of persons or ment new ways of reaching the groups. It means that more and intended audience and can create more we incorporate BI analytics, a fan following with all the alerts we will tend to not only analysis and widgets in social networking and assist but also enhance the sites. The pitfall is that if the indi- system to guide the community. viduals on social networking sites When people get use to this kind of think it is cool to do something system, they behave in an orderly stupid they would do it just for the fashion without much variation in fun of it. This would obviously give their communication and which inaccurate BI results. may extend to their day to day pThe best use of BI in social is to activity. As a software development understand the ever changing company or research institute in BI behavior of persons or groups. An may definitely see some major COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 27
  28. 28. STUDY FINDINGS challenges to understand and pBetter proximity to customer, build the system, but after some brand awareness, customer, loy- time the scope will be diminished alty, increased sales / revenue, to such an extent that there will be customer retention and generation no more activity to be left to cover, etc. since I believe in chaos you get pBeing able to assess [what grabs]INTRODUCTION more space to explore that stag- public attention; loads of noise to nant environment. filter through. pMost useful is that communica- pDon’t believe all you read (verify, THE tions becomes more routine and then trust). CORPORATE- SOCIAL faster. Most concern is that it can pTo get more customers is the most CONNECTION be impersonal and brevity may lucrative aspect of that purpose. lead to confusion of intent or tone. To spend too much time looking pGetting deeper demographics is for business solutions is the pitfall BI AND THE the plus, trusting the data is the of that. SOCIAL ENTERPRISE minus. pTo make direct focused campaigns. pThe main advantage would be that Pitfalls: social acceptance of it. it gives you a full picture of internal pResource allocation, the reliance on THE STUDY and external data, which can be others throughout the organization analyzed together. The pitfall is to to understand requirements, and to put all this together and to filter it so be able to change course rapidlySTUDY FINDINGS it can be relevant and easy to use. and effectively when the need arises pMore data is gathered so company (e.g., economy, competition, etc.) is data rich and [has the] potential respectively. ABOUT THE of winning more customers. Issues AUTHOR p[Good for] niche marketing; be are: Metadata management, data really good at categorizing the loading reliability, security, and answers. data integrity. pExposure can be good for generat- pPitfalls: In many areas, it is simply a ing leads—however *unqualified* solution in search of a problem leads can waste a lot of time. where one doesn’t exist. [Social pAt a guess, real time monitoring of media use must not] be construed brand image, customer satisfac- as an invasion of privacy/big tion and corporate following. Pit- brother. falls, possibility of very negative pAlign to target audience need. Pit- feedback exposed to the wider falls: Are responses actual or market, Guidance, with industry casual? [You] miss out many experts, risk assess mechanisms [stakeholders who] are not using and applications in identifying, social media. implementing and managing COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 28
  29. 29. STUDY FINDINGS social media concepts. pWide data brings better decisions. pPitfall is that most of the cost is pInclude unsolicited feedback. not measured, because it’s peo- p[Compare] data trends versus ple’s time that could be invested opinions of product users. elsewhere. pWhy use social marketing if you p[You are] able to get closer to the are not going to track it? You mustINTRODUCTION customer to get a better feel of invest in the proper tracking meth- customer expectations, May be ods or you are just shooting in the able to draw false conclusions dark. THE from bad data pUnderstand what is being meas- CORPORATE- SOCIAL pPublicity will be great, with a risk ured, attain the best tools to CONNECTION of security. measure and get buy in for senior management. Guidance: Process, data & tools pHave an interdisciplinary team set BI AND THE pKnow your market and your cus- up the tool and analyze the SOCIAL ENTERPRISE tomers and don’t expect miracles. responses. pResearch thoroughly and take rele- pNeed to have good analytics with vant security measures. social objects and collection of THE STUDY pRequirement gathering should be data also very important. done accurately. pUnderstand and evaluate the pGet the overall picture. information gained from socialSTUDY FINDINGS pBuild a good action plan before media reporting BEFORE acting on starting anything. perceived results. pNot everyone uses social tools to pKeep it simple, get used to it. ABOUT THE interact. Understand the demo- AUTHOR pJust do it! graphics. Be patient and be willing to train staff on how to use the tools that you expect patrons are PROFILE OF RESPONDENTS using. A summary profile of respondents pKnow what you expect to gain and will help you assess findings how you plan to achieve those reported here. We asked: goals prior to getting “dirty” pBe purpose orientated. Q20: What is your primary job func- pClearly define your outcomes; oth- tion? [n=322] erwise you could be swamped SEE FIGURE 21 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. with unnecessary ‘noise.’ pFocus on other areas that bring Of those who responded to the more bottom-line benefits. This is profile questions, over 55% work in still peripheral and emerging. information technology, software, or COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 29
  30. 30. • STUDY FINDINGS data systems. Respondents do rep- Two industry categories, “Hospi- resent a broad variety of industries tality or Travel” and “Marketing, although information technology is Public Relations, or Communica- overrepresented: • tions” are notably underrepre- sented in Q21 responses. Industries Q21: What industry do you work in? in each of these categories are veryINTRODUCTION [n=322] heavy social-media users. Several SEE FIGURE 22 FOR A CHART OF RESPONSES. industries in these categories are THE CORPORATE- SOCIAL Count Percent CONNECTION Sales, marketing, or business development (executive, 72 22.4% manager, or staff) Human resources (executive, manager, or staff) 4 1.2% BI AND THE Other line-of-business (executive, manager, or staff) 22 6.8% SOCIAL Software or data-systems architect, developer, engineer, or 76 23.6% ENTERPRISE manager Information technology support or other IT (executive, 105 32.6% manager, or staff) Agency, consultant, or systems integrator 12 3.7% THE STUDY Writer or industry analyst 6 1.9% Other 25 7.8%STUDY FINDINGS FIGURE 21: Primary Job Function of Respondents ABOUT THE AUTHOR Count Percent Academia or Education 23 7.1% Computing or Internet 39 12.1% Entertainment 4 1.2% Financial Services 27 8.4% Government 29 9.0% Healthcare—Clinical or Research 18 5.6% Hospitality or Travel 1 0.3% IT or Business Services 91 28.3% Manufacturing, Transportation or Logistics 25 7.8% Marketing, Public Relations or Communications 3 0.9% Retail or Wholesale 17 5.3% Telecom 12 3.7% Other 33 10.2% FIGURE 22: Respondents’ Industries COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 30
  31. 31. STUDY FINDINGS also significant BI users, with public analytics tools that are a must for relations and communications organizations that wish to auto- exceptions. The author surmises mate analysis of online content and that this survey did not reach social- enterprise feedback. Further only a media users in these categories. minority are building social styles into BI processes.INTRODUCTION These statements seem pes- CONCLUSION simistic, but as study findings they Only a minority of organizations are in line with expectations. Social THE are using leading social platforms BI is in its early days. There is a CORPORATE- SOCIAL for business purposes, and most clear link between social participa- CONNECTION that do are using only basic analy- tion and enterprise outcomes. BI tical methods to track social-media will grow to encompass web and mentions and to quantify the social analytics. The Social BI ques- BI AND THE impact of social-platform presence tion is not If; the questions are SOCIAL ENTERPRISE and engagement. A determined When and How. This study has minority use BI tools for social sought and reported findings that analyses, and few use the text- begin to answer these questions.p THE STUDYSTUDY FINDINGS Seth Grimes Report author Seth Grimes is an information technology analyst and analytics strategy consultant. He is contributing editor at TechWeb’s Intelligent Enterprise magazine, ABOUT THE founding chair of the Text Analytics Summit, an instructor for The Data Warehousing AUTHOR Institute (TDWI), and text analytics channel expert at TechTarget’s BeyeNETWORK. Seth has worked with database, BI, and decision-support applications and users for more than 25 years. He founded Washington DC-based Alta Plana Corporation in 1997. He consults, writes, and speaks on information-systems strategy, data management and analysis systems, industry trends, and emerging analytical technologies. Seth can be reached at grimes@altaplana.com, +1 301-270-0795. COPYRIGHT © 2010 TECHTARGET P SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE ENTERPRISE BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE/ANALYTICS CONNECTION 31
  32. 32. SAS® Customer Intelligence Campaign Management and Optimization | Online Analytics | Real-Time Decision Management Social Media Analytics | E-mail/Mobile MarketingWhat if you could know which bad applewould spoil your brand? You can. SAS gives you The Power to Know.® With SAS Social Media Analytics, you can listen, understand and predict ® the impacts of social media on your business. www.sas.com/apple for a free white paper SAS and all other SAS Institute Inc. product or service names are registered trademarks or trademarks of SAS Institute Inc. in the USA and other countries. ® indicates USA registration. Other brand and product names are trademarks of their respective companies. © 2010 SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved. S63915US.1010
  33. 33. RESOURCES FROM OUR SPONSORSee ad page• Acting on Customer Intelligence from Social Media: The New Edge for Building Customer & your Brand• Social Media Metrics: Listening, Understanding and Predicting the Impacts of Social Media• Turning Customer Data into Analytical Marketing Fuel White Paper Marketing ActivityAbout SAS Institute Inc.:SAS is the leader in business analytics software and services, and the largest independentvendor in the business intelligence market. Through innovative solutions delivered within anintegrated framework, SAS helps customers at more than 45,000 sites improve performanceand deliver value by making better decisions faster. Since 1976 SAS has been giving customersaround the world THE POWER TO KNOW®.

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