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Ii 2 Iess 2010

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Determinants of Continuance Intention towards Self-Service Innovation: A Case of Electronic Government Services …

Determinants of Continuance Intention towards Self-Service Innovation: A Case of Electronic Government Services
HSU, WANG, DOONG

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  • 1. Determinants
of
Con7nuance
 Inten7on
towards
Self‐Service
 Innova7on:
A
Case
of
Electronic
 Government
Services


 HSU,
WANG,
DOONG

  • 2. Research
Ra7onale‐1
 •  Service
science
was
proposed
to
integrate
 people,
management
and
technologies.

 •  By
revealing
how
people
interact,
innovate,
 evolve
and
learn
the
self‐service
systems,
such
 as
electronic
government
(e‐Government)
 services,
the
service
science
has
brought
 together
the
wisdom
of
marke7ng
science
in
a
 way
that
is
poten7ally
transforming
 informa7on
communica7on
technologies
 prac7ce.


  • 3. Research
Ra7onale‐2
 •  e‐Government
innova7on
service
was
regarded
to
 have
transformed
governments’
capability
to
 serve
their
ci7zens
and
businesses
(Bekkers,
 2003).
Thus
it
is
a
good
instance
showing
such
 service
innova7ons
demands
the
presence
of
a
 user
par7cipa7ng
in
the
service
manufacturing
 and
delivery
process.
 •  Building
a
successful
e‐Government
was
crucial
for 
 governors
worldwide.
Government
spending
on
 the
Internet
and
related
network
technologies
had
 gone
up
to
nearly
five
7mes
more
by
2005
than
 that
in
1999
(Gartner
Group).


  • 4. Research
Ra7onale‐3
 •  However,
despite
all
the
hype
revolving
around
e‐ Government,
it
has
been
argued
that
its
promised
 benefits
may
con7nue
to
be
an
elusive
dream
in
 many
cases.
 •  Studies
conducted
in
various
countries,
such
as
 Switzerland
[5],
Canada
[11],
Australia
[2]
and
the
 Netherlands
[7],
have
reported
that
governmental
 agencies
s7ll
face
a
high
volume
of
contacts
via
 tradi7onal
service
channels,
i.e.
telephone
and
 face‐to‐face.
In
other
words,
ci7zens
apparently
 do
not
perceive
the
e‐Government
to
be
more
 convenient
or
useful
than
tradi7onal
channels.

 They
thus
prefer
to
request
services
either
in
 person
or
via
the
telephone.

  • 5. Research
Ra7onale‐4
 •  Such
findings
may
reflect
the
fact
that

 –  e‐Government
development
was
mainly
explored
from
 a
supply‐side
approach,
whilst
the
demand
side,
i.e.
 from
the
user’s
approach,
was
few
[31].


 –  Most
exis7ng
e‐Government
literature
was
too
 theore7cal
in
nature
[10].
The
majority
of
user’s
 approach
studies
only
used
classical
theories
such
as
 Innova7on
Diffusion
Theory
and
Technology
 Acceptance
Model.

 •  As
service
science
is
proposed
to
integrate
people,
 management
and
technology,
lacking
the
 knowledge
about
how
user
will
respond
to
an
 innova7ve
self‐service
means
losing
the
connec7on
 to
one
core
component,
resul7ng
in

the
difficul7es
 of
many
countries
in
abaining
success
in
their
e‐ Government
implementa7on.


  • 6. Research
Ques7ons 
 •  Which
ci7zen
segment
will
use
e‐Government
 service
more
frequently
than
other
segments?”

 •  It
aims
to
reveal
how
ci7zens’
psychological
traits
of 
 innova7veness
and
involvement
may
interact
with
 each
other
and
further
shape
their
usage
towards
 “e‐Housekeeper”,
a
new
e‐Government
service
 launched
in
Taiwan
at
2007.
  • 7. Research
Objec7ves 
 1.  To
facilitate
the
understanding
of
government
towards
 the
ci7zen’s
actual
needs
so
as
to
(1)
recognize
the
 value
of
crea7ng
a
collabora7ve
process
between
 government
and
ci7zens/business
and
(2)
bridge
the
 front
stage
and
back
stage
in
innova7ve
service
design
 and
implementa7on.

 2.  To
respond
to
Chan
et
al.’s
(2008)
call
for
governments
 to
recognize
that
even
the
best
e‐Government
 infrastructure
cannot
guarantee
widespread
adop7on
 and
con7nuous
usage,
the
promo7on
of
e‐services
is
 equally
important
in
its
implementa7on.


  • 8. e‐Government 
 •  e‐Government
is
u7lizing
the
Internet
and
the
World‐ Wide‐Web
for
delivering
government
informa7on
and
 services
to
business
and
ci7zens
(American
Society
for
 Public
Administra7on).

 •  Means
and
Schneider
focused
on
the
inter‐ rela7onship
and
defined
e‐Government
as
“the
 rela7onships
between
governments,
their
customers
 (businesses,
other
governments,
and
ci7zens),
and
 their
suppliers
by
the
use
of
electronic
means”.

 •  Brown
and
Brudney
highlighted
the
efficiency
aspect
 and
defined
e‐Government
as
the
use
of
technology,
 especially
Web‐based
applica7ons,
to
enhance
access
 to
and
efficiently
deliver
government
informa7on
and
 services.

  • 9. e‐Government 
 •  From
the
government
perspec7ve,
e‐Government
is
 believed
to
be
a
cost‐efficient
channel
that
can
 enhance
efficiency,
improve
effec7veness
and
reduce
 bureaucracy
in
government
affairs
[29].

 •  It
will
improve
ci7zens/business
interac7on
with
 government
by
empowering
them
to
deal
with
 government
online
at
any7me
while
saving
the
hours
 spent
in
the
paperwork,
traveling
to
a
government
 office,
and
wai7ng
in
line
[31].

 •  Building
a
successful
e‐Government
was
a
priority
for
 governors’
major
administra7ve
plans
worldwide.
  • 10. Cogni7ve
Style
of
Innova7veness‐1
 •  Innova7veness
is
“consump7on
of
newness,”
a
 tendency
to
buy
new
products
more
oken
and
more
 quickly
than
other
people
within
the
same
market
[25].
 
 •  Individuals
that
are
most
likely
to
buy
a
new
product
 aker
it
is
introduced
into
the
marketplace
are
 innovators
[33]
or
market
ini7ators
[12].

 •  Clark
and
Goldsmith
[9]
asserted
that
determining
the
 personality
characteris7cs
that
influence
innovators
to
 purchase
a
new
product
early
in
the
product
life
cycle
 is
essen7al
for
the
success
of
innova7ons.

  • 11. Cogni7ve
Style
of
Innova7veness‐2
 •  In
the
adap7on‐innova7on
theory,
Kirton
[21]
 proposed
that
individuals
characteris7cally
exhibit
one
 of
two
dis7nct
cogni7ve
styles
of
problem
solving
and
 decision‐making:
innovators
or
adaptors.


 •  Innovators
love
to
break
exis7ng
rules
or
process,
take
 risks
and
look
out
for
novel
solu7ons.

However,
the
 adaptors
feel
most
comfortable
to
follow
well‐ established
rules
or
process.

Kirton
posited
that
 individuals
can
be
located
on
this
con7nuum
and
their
 loca7on
represents
their
style
of
problem
solving
and
 decision‐making.

  • 12. Cogni7ve
Style
of
Innova7veness‐3
 •  This
dis7nct
cogni7ve
style
is
closely
related
to
the
 regularity
and
consistency
of
individual’s
behavior
 (Foxall,
2003).


 •  Innovators
are
important
sales
sources
for
any
 company
as
 –  they
use
the
product
more
frequently
than
other
customers
 do
 –  they
are
good
sources
of
informa7on
regarding
crucial
 insights
into
how
customers
view
the
new
product,
its
 posi7oning,
features
and
other
key
marke7ng
aspects
 –  they
are
oken
heavily
involved
in
the
product
field
(Bloch,
 Sherrell,
and
Ridgway,
1986).

That
is,
innovators
find,
for
 example,
e‐Government
service
is
important
to
them.

  • 13. Individual’s
Involvement‐1
 •  Involvement
 has
 played
 a
 significant
 role
 in
 behavior 
 theories
 [36]
 and
 its
 impact
 on
 customers’
 responses
 to
 adver7sing,
 products,
 and
 technology
 has
 been
 widely 
 discussed
[22].


 •  Involvement
 is
 the
 interest
 an
 individual
 finds
 in
 a
 product
 class:
 that
 is,
 the
 individual’s
 percep7on
 of 
 whether
 the
 product
 class
 meets
 his/her
 important 
 values
or
goals
[26].


 •  Individuals
with
higher
product
involvement
are
likely
to
 seek
 more
 informa7on
 about
 products
 [3],
 and
 form 
 antudes
toward
the
product
which
are
more
resistant
to 
 change
[28].
  • 14. Individual’s
Involvement‐2
 •  Personal
involvement
has
been
widely
used
to
explain 
 customer
behaviors
in
interac7ng
with
new
services
in 
 the
 e‐marketplace,
 such
 as
 how
 personal
 involvement 
 posi7vely
 influences
 customers’
 Website
 purchase 
 frequency
 [35]
 and
 how
 they
 respond
 to
 avatars
 and
 sales
agents
[20].


 •  To
 a
 great
 extent,
 the
 adop7on
 of
 innova7ve
 self‐ services
 is
 a
 type
 of
 customer
 behavior:
 users
 act
 as 
 customers
 and
 the
 innova7ve
 self‐service
 is
 the 
 product.
 
 As
 such,
 involvement
 may
 provide
 good 
 explana7ons
 of
 ci7zens’
 percep7ons
 and
 behaviors 
 toward
an
innova7ve
e‐Government
self‐service.

  • 15. Research
Proposi7ons

1
 •  Product
Involvement
is
the
interest
a
consumer
finds
 in
a
product
class,
which
stems
from
the
consumer’s
 percep7on
that
the
product
class
meets
important
 values/goals.

 •  The
more
involved
a
consumer
is
with
a
par7cular
 product,
the
more
likely
it
is
that
product
knowledge
 will
be
established
through
the
experiences
gained
in
 possessing,
purchasing
and
using
the
product
(Park
 and
Moon,
2003).


 •  P1:
There
are
posi.ve
rela.onship
between
users’
 involvement
level
and
their
innova.ve
e‐Government
 self‐service
usage
frequency.

  • 16. Research
Proposi7ons

2
 •  Foxall
and
Bhate
[15]
reported
that
innova7ve
 cogni7ve
style
is
significantly
related
to
the
number
 of
home
computer
sokware
packages
used
by
 individuals.

In
another
study,
Foxall
and
Bhate
[14]
 indicated
that
compared
to
adaptors,
innovators
 have
significantly
higher
overall
computer
usage,
 frequency
of
computer
use
and
number
of
sokware
 packages
used.

 •  P2:
There
are
posi.ve
rela.onship
between
users’
 innova.veness
level
and
their
innova.ve
e‐Government
self‐ service
usage
frequency.

  • 17. Research
Proposi7ons

3
 •  Foxall
argued
that
individuals’
choice
is
shaped
by
their
 innova7veness
level
[21]
and
involvement
level
[37].

 Upon
the
interac7on
of
these
two
psychological
 constructs,
customers’
purchase
decision
making
can
 be
categorized
into
four
different
types:
complex
 buying,
dissonance
buying,
habitual
buying
and
variety
 seeking
[13].


 •  P3:
Less‐involved
adaptors,
less‐involved
innovators,
 more
involved
adaptors,
and
more‐involved
innovators
 differ
in
their
con.nuance
inten.on
toward
innova.ve
 e‐Government
self‐services.

More‐involved
adaptors
 have
the
highest
level
of
con.nuance
frequency
toward
 innova.ve
e‐Government
self‐service.

  • 18. Contribu7ons 
 1.  It
 verifies
 and
 advances
 past
 studies
 in
 term
 of
 the 
 profiles
 of
 innovators
 [32],
 Foxall’s
 [12]
 proposi7on
 of 
 the
 rela7onship
 between
 individual’s
 cogni7ve
 style/ involvement
 and
 their
 behavior,
 and
 Wang
 et
 al.’s
 [35] 
 empirical
results
in
a
new
and
different
service
science 
 context
in
terms
of
e‐Government
self‐service.
 2.  This
 study
 may
 contribute
 to
 the
 ini7al
 opera7on
 of 
 new
 innova7ve
 self‐services,
 which
 has
 long
 been 
 regarded
as
a
difficult
task.

By
showing
that
some
users 
 are
 more
 likely
 to
 accept
 the
 new
 innova7ve
 self‐ services
 faster
 and
 use
 these
 services
 more
 frequently
 than
others,
this
study’s
findings
can
be
well
integrated 
 into
 and
 enhance
 the
 effec7veness
 of
 the
 pilot 
 implementa7on
strategy.

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