#TFT14 Rui Soares, Drawing stories for a change (or two)

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#TFT14 Rui Soares, Drawing stories for a change (or two)

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We must nurture a context where people want to change. ...

We must nurture a context where people want to change.
So I've been writing and talking about Storytelling applied to service management. And drawing stories too... I believe telling stories is a natural and potent way of sharing and supporting change. Want to see me presenting on storytelling at TFT14 (live drawing included, no mushrooms will be harmed)? Vote me up (yes, there on the left next to the photo).

With thanks for Ca Technologies for sponsoring TFT14 slides. For a free trial of Nimsoft go to bit.ly/1df6jY7

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  • Thanks to Chris Dancy and SDI for being here.
    Thanks to all who voted for me.
    Dedicated to those who are gone but stay in the heart.
  • Thanks to Chris Dancy and SDI for being here.
    Thanks to all who voted for me.
    Dedicated to those who are gone but stay in the heart.
    About me: Father of three, husband of one all gorgeous (big thanks). Love to share, teach, talk and draw about things I grok. Life is short.
  • Why? Origins? A little story from myself (3 candidates. A Personal story. SOmeone that kicked me. Someone that surprised me)
  • Story by Lewis Carr
    ol (Charles Lutwige Dodgson), Image by Sir John Tenniel. Alice was Alice Liddell
    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/11/11-h/11-h.htm
  • http://blog.bufferapp.com/great-customer-service-legendary
    The company response:
    All Bungie team signed and sent a card with get well wishes
    They built a custom helmet based off of the main character and sent it along w shirts, toys and custom art from the game’s designers
  • http://lifehacker.com/5965703/the-science-of-storytelling-why-telling-a-story-is-the-most-powerful-way-to-activate-our-brains
    If we listen to a powerpoint presentation with boring bullet points, a certain part in the brain gets activated. Scientists call this Broca's area and Wernicke's area. Overall, it hits our language processing parts in the brain, where we decode words into meaning. And that's it, nothing else happens.
    -
    Broca area, also called convolution of Broca,  region of the brain that contains motor neurons involved in the control of speech. This area, located in the frontal part of the left hemisphere of the brain, was discovered in 1861 by French surgeon Paul Broca, who found that it served a vital role in the generation of articulate speech.
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/135877/Broca-area
    Wernicke area, region of the brain that contains motor neurons involved in the comprehension ofspeech. This area was first described in 1874 by German neurologist Carl Wernicke. The Wernicke area is located in the posterior third of the upper temporal convolution of the left hemisphere of the brain. Thus, it lies close to the auditory cortex. This area appears to be uniquely important for the comprehension of speech sounds and is considered to be the receptive language, or language comprehension, centre.
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/639879/Wernicke-area
  • Researchers have discovered that words describing motion also stimulate regions of the brain distinct from language-processing areas. In a study led by the cognitive scientist Véronique Boulenger, of the Laboratory of Language Dynamics in France, the brains of participants were scanned as they read sentences like “John grasped the object” and “Pablo kicked the ball.” The scans revealed activity in the motor cortex, which coordinates the body’s movements. What’s more, this activity was concentrated in one part of the motor cortex when the movement described was arm-related and in another part when the movement concerned the leg.
  • Take the story as close to them as you can
    Keep it brief and simple- especially for younger children - pare down to the heart of the story.
    Stimulate their senses so they feel, smell, touch and listen and see vivid pictures.
    Describe the characters and settings, and help them sympathize with the character's feelings.
    [Aim your story at the younger ones when telling to a audience of mixed ages!]
  • Take the story as close to them as you can
    Keep it brief and simple- especially for younger children - pare down to the heart of the story.
    Stimulate their senses so they feel, smell, touch and listen and see vivid pictures.
    Describe the characters and settings, and help them sympathize with the character's feelings.
    [Aim your story at the younger ones when telling to a audience of mixed ages!]
  • Switch, Chip and Dan Heath
    The road is clear: Clarity
    Read: Switch (Dan and Chip Heath) &To sell is human (Dan Pink)
    http://www.slideshare.net/usbed/switch-by-chip-dan-heath
    Their heart wants it: Motivation
    Read:Drive - Autonomy+Mastery+Meaning (Dan Pink)
    The situation changes, the behaviour changes
    Read: The Design of Everyday Things, Donald Norman
    In order to move others, we need to become much better at clearly stating what it is we want and where it is we want people to go.
  • In order to move others, we need to become much better at clearly stating what it is we want and where it is we want people to go. Pink presents the Pixar Pitch as a prime tool in thinking about this. 
    -
    This formula has been used by Pixar in every movie they made. It conveys an idea in story format.
    -
    Using the storytelling format creates a kind of distance that allows the story to reveal itself more clearly.
    It forces you to tell the story simply, without all the jargon that usually makes pitches muddy and too complicated to process.
    Like all good structures, the Pixar Pitch helps to organize your thoughts in a succinct way
    It’s fun
  • http://www.workingdifferently.org/4/post/2013/03/the-pixar-pitch-telling-your-story-crisply-and-with-clarity-in-order-to-compel-action.html
    By Jay Connor
  • Can you make the need for change visual? Things you see are more likely to evoke emotion than things you read.
    On drawing. Colour is way more effective.
  • Clay Mush and Room, by Mafalda my elder daughter
  • Every day, Mush kept asking for all kinds of things
  • One day, Room took all his requests…
  • 9 tips for better storytelling, by Sean Buvala
    http://www.storyteller.net/articles/296
    The Storytelling FAQ, by Tim Shappard
    http://www.timsheppard.co.uk/story/faq.html
    http://aerogrammestudio.com/2013/03/07/pixars-22-rules-of-storytelling/ These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s Story Artist.
    EXTRAS:
    The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains
    http://lifehacker.com/5965703/the-science-of-storytelling-why-telling-a-story-is-the-most-powerful-way-to-activate-our-brains
    Kurt Vonegut on writing stories
    http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/04/03/kurt-vonnegut-on-writing-stories/
    Storyteller's Start-Up BookMacDonald, Margaret Read
    Sold by Amazon EU S.a.r.L.
    Storyteller's Guide (American Storytelling)Mooney, William
    Sold by Amazon EU S.a.r.L.
  • Invite to action. As with all we learn, unless we try it by ourselves, it wont stick.
    BE UNIQUE.
    BE YOURSELF, EVERYBODY ELSE IS TAKEN. Oscar Wilde
     your own new story you want for your life
     your company's story for a new strategy
     a compelling story you want to share to change bad habits
  • BPMN2.0 cross the language barrier between business and IT by using a clear and visual notation.
  • But when introduced without a story, a context, may be hard to “grok”
  • One way to go around it is to present it in a non-IT and relate it to fairly common activities, like the wake up routine.
  • Chris Dancy for TFT. SDI. Good people at Brighttalk – Zoe James and Van le – they got 3 letters names!
    Rob and Antonio for pushing me with my stories!
    João Menino, my boss for letting me pursue what I love
    Carlos Melo, that developed the BPMN2.0 story

Transcript

  • 1. Rui Soares Drawing stories for a change (or two)
  • 2. ruisoares@widesys.com itilblues.wordpress.com @rumagoso
  • 3. ‘No, no! The adventures first,’ said the Gryphon in an impatient tone: ‘explanations take such a dreadful time.’
  • 4. http://blog.bufferapp.com/great-customer-service-legendary Power of stories
  • 5. • • • • • Powerpoint presentation with Boring Broca boring bullet points Wearisome Wernicke it hits only our language processing parts in the brain Powerpoint bullets and the brain
  • 6. But when we are being told a story… the narrative activates also other parts of the brain our brains experience the events of the story Stories and the brain
  • 7. Take the story as close to them as you can Keep it brief and simple Stimulate their senses Describe the characters and settings Adapting to your audience
  • 8. Take the story as close to them as you can Keep it brief and simple Stimulate their senses Describe the characters and settings Adapting to your audience
  • 9. People change when: The road is clear Their heart wants it The situation changes When do people change?
  • 10. Once upon a time Every Day One day Because of that Because of that Until finally Pixar pitch – the formula
  • 11. Once upon a time a widowed fish, named Marlin, who was extremely protective of his only son, Nemo. Every day Marlin warned Nemo of the ocean’s dangers and implored him not to swim far away. One day, in an act of defiance, Nemo ignores his father’s warnings and swims into the open water. Because of that, he is captured by a diver and ends up in the fish tank of a dentist in Sydney. Because of that, Marlin sets off on a journey to recover Nemo, enlisting the help of other sea creatures along the way. Until finally Marlin and Nemo find each other, reunite and learn that love depends on trust. Pixar pitch – Finding Nemo
  • 12. Once upon a time
  • 13. Every day…
  • 14. One day…
  • 15. Because of that…
  • 16. Because of that…
  • 17. IT rocks! Until finally…
  • 18. • The Phoenix Project, by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr and George Spafford – http://itrevolution.com/books/phoenix-project-devops-book/ • Effective Storytelling, by Barry McWillliams – http://www.eldrbarry.net/roos/eest.htm • Pixar’s 22 rules of storytelling, by Emma Coats – http://aerogrammestudio.com/2013/03/07/pixars-22-rules-ofstorytelling/ • Unfolding the Napkin, by Dan Roam – http://www.danroam.com/unfolding-the-napkin-is-available/ Resources
  • 19. Take a story skeleton and fill it up with:  your own new story  your company's story  a compelling story you want to share Invite to action
  • 20. BPMN is great to talk about business processes  It’s standard  It’s a visual notation  Implies no technical knowledge The BPMN approach
  • 21. The BPMN approach – storyfied?
  • 22. Hygiene & dressing up breakfast commuting Hygiene Going to office dress suit take bath Wake up Going to customer dress kids dress jeans The BPMN approach – Use life
  • 23. Rob England Antonio Valle Salas João Menino Carlos Melo
  • 24. Questions
  • 25. With thanks to our slides sponsor, CA Technologies Try Nimsoft for free at ca.com/NSD-trial