Dan Baden - Lessons Learned From the First Federal Healthcare Game Jam

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This session covers the CDC Health Game Jam which was held in September 2013. The goals were to increase interest in public health careers and to rapidly and inexpensively develop demos of health education games. We will discuss the results of the effort, the lessons learned, and the next steps.

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  • http://www.cdc.gov/winnablebattles/
  • 1. "A video game improves behavioral outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer: a randomized trial." Pediatrics, August 2008. Retrieved 04-08-2009.

    2. In 2011, players of Fold-it helped to decipher the crystal structure of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) retroviral protease, an AIDS-causing monkey virus. While the puzzle was available to play for a period of three weeks, players produced an accurate 3D model of the enzyme in just 10 days. The problem of how to configure the structure of the enzyme had stumped scientists for 15 years.[7][8]
  • 2013 GGJ: http://2013.globalgamejam.org/status Atlanta 230
    2014 GGJ: http://globalgamejam.org/jam-sites/2014/bysize NYC 311, Atl 257 (Numbers not yet confirmed)
  • Wash hands
    Don’t cross-contaminate
    Cook meat at the right temperature
  • Dan Baden - Lessons Learned From the First Federal Healthcare Game Jam

    1. 1. Dan Baden, MD CDC/OSTLTS Peter Jenkins CDC/OADC Leigh Willis, PhD, MPH CDC/NCHHSTP Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    2. 2. Objectives 1. Get people with 21st century skills interested in public health 2. Rapidly and inexpensively make demos of innovative health-education outreach tools
    3. 3. CDC’s Winnable Battles http://www.cdc.gov/winnablebattles/
    4. 4. Why Not Have a Game Jam?
    5. 5. We hoped to bring together at least 100 students and professional game designers
    6. 6. Have them form teams…
    7. 7. And work with CDC and industry experts…
    8. 8. To envision…
    9. 9. Design…
    10. 10. And code...
    11. 11. Working demos of health games Maddie Beasly, Nathan Barella, Sam Arrants, Taylor Agni, Logan Cooper, Ryan Drescher, Levoski Brown. Pulse: SPSU Game Jam 2013.
    12. 12. All in one 48-hour period
    13. 13. We then planned to give the winning team a paid, 4-week internship at CDC
    14. 14. Why Use Games?  58% of Americans play video games  Average game player is 30 years old  45% of all game players are women  Women over 18 outnumber boys age 17 or younger (31% vs. 19%) http://www.theesa.com/facts/gameplayer.asp
    15. 15. But Really, Games?  Re-mission1  Fold-it2  Robert Wood Johnson Foundation • Games for Health Conference • Health Games Research  White House’s Office for Science and Technology Policy’s Federal Games Guild 1. Pediatrics, Vol. 122, No. 2. August 1, 2008, pp. e305–e317. 2. The Huffington Post, September 19, 2011.
    16. 16. Number of Attendees Goal = 100
    17. 17. Number of Attendees Goal = 100 Actual = ~300
    18. 18. Number of Attendees Goal = 100 Actual = ~300 The same weekend that Grand Theft Auto V came out
    19. 19.  Largest Game Jam ever held in the US  First federal Game Jam ever 2013 GGJ: http://2013.globalgamejam.org/status CDC Health Game Jam 2013 Facts
    20. 20. Number of Health Game Demos Produced Goal = 12
    21. 21. Number of Health Game Demos Produced Goal = 12 Actual = 29
    22. 22. Percentage of Game Jam Participants Expressing Interest in Public Health Interest before Game Jam = 12%
    23. 23. Percentage of Game Jam Participants Expressing Interest in Public Health Interest before Game Jam = 12% Interest after Game Jam = 50%
    24. 24. • Wellness 6 • Nutrition 6 • Food safety 3 • Heart disease 3 • Antibiotic resistance 2 • Injury prevention (including texting) 2 • Influenza 2 • Healthcare-associated infections 2 • HIV 2 • Teen pregnancy 1 Number of Health Games Demos Developed
    25. 25. Kitchen Outbreak – Demo Michelle Flamm, Matthew Harris, Jesse Serrano, Valerie Mears, Caleb Fruin.
    26. 26. Insights and Challenges  Partners are easy to find  Subject matter experts want to help  Free admission is critical  Recognition is more important than prize money  Furlough
    27. 27. Conclusions  Demonstrated that a Game Jam can build interest in public health  Demonstrated that a Game Jam can rapidly develop inexpensive demos of health games
    28. 28. Next Step Host the 2014 HHS Health Game Jam
    29. 29. For more information, please contact CDC’s Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support 4770 Buford Highway NE, Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341 Telephone: 1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636)/TTY: 1-888-232-6348 E-mail: OSTLTSfeedback@cdc.gov Web: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth The findings and conclusions in this presentation are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support Questions? Dan Baden, MD dbaden1@cdc.gov 404-498-0339

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