Life extension 040812
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  • Normal medicine deals with you when something has gone wrong or is going wrong. It generally doesn’t teach you to keep things from going wrong or to avoid things starting to go wrong by noticing them early.Life Extension is very experimental. It is not FDA approved medicine and much of it does not have a decade or more of clinical supporting data. You have to think for yourself and do your homework. A good life extension doctor is invaluable for information and monitoring and advising. But only you can do the work and your own body is the lab where the results will be played out.
  • 23andmehttps://www.23andme.com/fyr/how-23andme-works/Get your genotype mapped.What is the difference between genotyping and sequencing?Though you may hear both terms in reference to obtaining information about DNA, genotyping and sequencing refer to slightly different things.Genotyping is the process of determining which genetic variants an individual possesses. Genotyping can be performed through a variety of different methods, depending on the variants of interest and resources available. At 23andMe, we look at SNPs, and a good way of looking at many SNPs in a single individual is a recently developed technology called a “DNA chip.”Sequencing is a method used to determine the exact sequence of a certain length of DNA. Depending on the location, a given stretch may include some DNA that varies between individuals, like SNPs, in addition to regions that are constant. So sequencing is one way to genotype someone, but not the only way.You might wonder, then, why we don't just sequence everyone's entire genome, and find every single genetic variant they possess. Unfortunately, sequencing technology has not yet progressed to the point where it is feasible to sequence an entire genome quickly and cheaply. It took the Human Genome Project over 10 years' work by multiple labs to sequence the three billion base pair genomes of just a few individuals. For now, genotyping technologies such as those used by 23andMe provide an efficient and cost-effective way of obtaining more than enough genetic information for scientists—and you—to study.
  • http://www.bodymedia.com/ http://www.bodymedia.com/Products/Learn-More/What-is-BodyMedia-FITYou burn calories differently than anyone else, which is why cookie-cutter weight loss programs may not be working for you. The BodyMedia FIT system captures 5,000+ readings every minute for over 90% calorie accuracy. This personalized info helps you pinpoint actions to take to reach your health and fitness goals.The four sensors in our little Armband pull data off your body at a clip of 5,000 data points per minute. All of that data gets categorized and analyzed and delivered to you in an easy-to-understand way. With this info you can unlock the secrets of your body and determine what you need to do (or stop doing) to lead a healthier life.The right info can help you lose weight. But, if you're away from your computer, how do you see data or log food? BodyMedia FIT has the answer! Using our FREE app, log food on your iOS® or Android™ mobile device* and see your most recent Activity Manager info.Plus the LINK Armband uses Bluetooth® wireless technology so you get real-timecalorie burn info.http://www.fitbit.com/product/specshttp://new.digifit.com/solutions/Digifit works with over 80 ANT+ health and fitness sensors including heart rate monitors, foot pods, and cadence sensors from popular brands including Garmin, Adidas, Bontrager, CycleOps, Timex, Quarq and more. Digifit also connects to sensors for blood pressure, weight and sleep monitoring. Shop at our store now for bundled solutions with our many partners.Quantified Selfhttp://quantifiedself.com/guide/
  • This slidedeck and more information is at http://lsmarr.calit2.net/presentations?slideshow=12259876.
  • More of Larry Smarr’s slides. Fish oil is very important for raising good cholesterol. It is also important to avoid corn, especially high fructose corn syrup. But also avoid meat form animals fed high corn diets. Corn is high in Omega 6. Most westeners have Omega 6 to Omega 3 rations over 6 time what is healthy. This has a lot to do with inflammation rates. www.yourfuturehealth.com is a great source of testing. Most any reputable blood drawing agency can draw the blood to send them for analysis. Not far into the future are microfluidic labs on a chip capable of doing hundreds of tests on a single drop of blood. Quarterly blood work is pricey today but very important if you want your life extension program to be guided by actual facts and feedback rather than hearsay and hope.
  • Over 90% of the cells in your body are not human cells. They are various bacteria, various microbiological colonies and systems. Your good health depends on their health. Much of the immune system in particular is dependent on the microbes in the human gut.

Life extension 040812 Life extension 040812 Presentation Transcript

  • Personal Life Extension What can you do today?
  • Participation is key• Your doctor can’t do it for you – A specialist in life extension can help – Waiting until something is broken won’t work – You are your own lab and must think• Incremental payoffs – No magic bullets but things that improve your life and chances - the quality of life• Complexity of the human body – Much more than most technology
  • Important aspects• Stress, stress reduction• Inflammation reduction• Importance of good sleep• Monitoring / Data – Gadgets – Getting genome mapped – Blood tests• Diet• Exercise – Aerobic – Strength• Supplements• Hormones• Getting and keeping your brain functioning well
  • Some simple steps• Weigh yourself every morning and record it• Develop discipline to follow through – Don’t beat yourself up• Aerobic and strength training – Latter important for metabolic rate• Quantify what you eat• Change what you eat – Avoid sugar, corn, processed flour – Grass fed lean meats if any• Track biomarkers with blood tests• Take your fish oil• Get your genotype mapped
  • From “How Do You Feel?”,to “What Are Your Numbers?”Where’s There’s Data There’s Hope
  • Data Gathering• Gadgets – BodyMedia • Multi-monitor armband • Calories, exercise, steps, sleep patterns – Lark • Sleep monitor and silent personal alarm – FitBit • Exercise monitor, sleep monitor, calorie tracking – DigFit • Gathers data from all Ant + compatible heart, exercise, blood pressure, etc monitors to iPhone and other iOS devices• Apps – MercuryApp • https://www.mercuryapp.com/ – Track anything, collect data and analyze data giving insights over time
  • From One to a Billion Data Points Defining Me:The Exponential Rise in Body Data in Just One Decade! Billion: MyFull Genome Full DNA, MRI/CT Images SNPs Million: My DNA SNPs, Zeo, FitBit Blood Variables One: Hundred: My Blood VariablesWeight Weight My
  • Blood Tests Larry Smarr Does Quarterly to Annually In Addition to Lipids• Electrolytes • Liver – Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, – GGTP, SGOT, SGPT, LDH, Total Direct Magnesium, Phosphorus, Boron, Bilirubin, Chlorine, CO2 Alkaline Phosphatase• Micronutrients • Thyroid – Arsenic, Chromium, Cobalt, Copper, – T3 Uptake, T4, Free Thyroxine Index, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, FT4, 2nd Gen TSH Selenium, Zinc • Blood Cells• Blood Sugar Cycle – Complete Blood Cell Count – Glucose, Insulin, A1C Hemoglobin – Red Blood Cell Subtypes• Cardio Risk – White Blood Cell Subtypes – Complex Reactive Protein • Cancer Screen – Homocysteine – CEA, Total PSA, % Free PSA• Kidneys – CA-19-9 – Bun, Creatinine, Uric Acid • Vitamins & Antioxidant Screen• Protein – Vit D, E; Selenium, ALA, coQ10, – Total Protein, Albumin, Globulin Glutathione, Total Antioxidant Fn. I Track Over 100 Blood Variables Over Time
  • Larry Greatly Lowered His Body’s Inflammation From Food By Increasing Omega-3s Ratio of AA/EPA “Silent Inflammation” Chronically Ill I take 6 Fish Oil American Pills Per Day Average “Healthy” American Ideal Range My Range Range Source: Barry Sears My Tests by www.yourfuturehealth.com
  • Autoimmune Diseases Effect 5-8% of Americans• Crohn’s Disease Despite decades of research, the etiology of Crohns disease remains• Ulcerative Colitis unknown.• Rheumatoid Arthritis Its pathogenesis may involve a• Multiple Sclerosis complex interplay between host genetics,• Psoriasis immune dysfunction,• Type 1 Diabetes, and microbial or environmental factors.• AnkylosingSpondylitis --The Role of Microbes in Crohns Disease Paul B. Eckburg& David A. Relman• Lupus Erythematosus Clin Infect Dis. 44:256-262 (2007)• Plus Over 70 Others The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
  • You are a Superorganism:Your Body Has Ten Microbes for Every Human Cell! Firmicutes Are the Dominant Phyla in the Human Microbiome Science v.330, p. 1619 (2010)
  • Next Step: Use Microarray to Measure Time Series of Microbial Diversity www.secondgenome.com “Second Genome has developed a sensitive, flexible and robust platform for the identification of microbiome-based signatures for the rapid identification of microbial gut health biomarkers.” DNA microarray that can identify, within hours, over 50,000 different microbesLBL’s Gary Andersenand his PhyloChip
  • The Gut Microbiome Has Been Mapped in the Last Five Years Using Genome Sequencing“A majority of the bacterial sequences corresponded to uncultivated species and novel microorganisms.” 395 Phylotypes Firmicutes Bacteroidetes “Diversity of the Human Intestinal Microbial Flora” Paul B. Eckburg, et al Science 308, 1635-8 (2005)