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Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in
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Poverty, socially engaged research and resistance in

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  • 1. POVERTY, SOCIALLY ENGAGED RESEARCH AND RESISTANCE IN SOUTH AFRICA’S POST-APARTHEID EDUCATIONSALIM VALLY, ENVER MOTALA,BRIAN RAMADIRO AND CAROL ANNE SPREEN Politics in Organizations By Sehriban Bugday
  • 2. OUTLINE-The Purpose of the Article-The Policy Issues in the Article-Effects of Global and LocalDiscourses-Results and Influences ofParticipatory Researches in SouthAfrica-Conclusion
  • 3. The Purpose of theArticle-South Africa is known for its resistance inpost-apartheid education in its history.-This resistance has created severalmovements against racial capitalism suchas the Peoples Education Movement, theWorker Education Movement and theCommunity Education Movement.-South Africa also struggles against theimpact of neo-liberalism, growing povertyand inequality.-This article explains the correlationbetween poverty, participatory actionresearch and resistance ,and also itfocuses on what these case studiessuggest about educational changing.
  • 4. The Purpose of the Article-Socially engaged researchers and activists in South Africahave joined several research projects in education and otherareas of social policy.-This is a positive development because they can provide amore detailed understanding of the issues and possiblesolutions. A traditional research that does not take intoaccount local nuances, history and culture often presentsonly a simple view of the problem, which leads to ineffectiveand even harmful solutions.-This article emphasizes the importance of socially-basedresearches that help to understand poverty and its socialeffects radically.-Also socially-based research can help engage with thepolicy and decision-making agencies of the state and withpublic representatives.-Moreover, such research can provide the necessarybackground to help resist the power of dominantdiscourse.
  • 5. What is the dominant discourse in thearticle? -The dominant discourse in much of the researchpresents a very simplified analysis without consideringlocal culture, history, and the experiences of the people.-A simplistic understanding of the policy makes up thedominant discourse. The simple analysis influencesgovernment policy, resulting in solutions that dont work.-The result is continued inequality and poverty.-Involving local groups in the social research shouldmake for a more sophisticated analysis, leading to morepractical solutions.
  • 6. The Policy Issues in the Article-South Africa suffers from levels of socialinequality, income poverty and unemployment.IssuesPost-apartheid Education-the existence of undemocratic and unrepresentativeschool policy-unaffordable school fees, transport and uniforms.-use of corporal punishment in schoolsUnemployment-poorly paid work-intermittent employment-insecure jobs
  • 7. How local and global discourses influence thepolicy?Local Discourses-First action was made by Poverty and Inequality Hearings organisedby the South African Non-Governmental Organization Coalition(SANGOCO).-People took to the streets and joined in public hearings.-The purpose was to increase the policies which provide to improveconditions for accessing people’s socio-economic rights.-All these responses brought public attention and pressure ongovernment officials and politicians to revise the neo-liberal macro-economic strategy and it’s negative effects.Result-Despite the hearings, the impact was limited, actually even threeyears after the Hearings, Department of Education’s survey showedthat negative conditions continued and in some cases had increased.
  • 8. Global Discourses-Education Rights Projects (ERP) and social movements pressurized the state toorganize the education rights(2002).-The intense press campaigns against the government position provided thatgovernment set up a reference group of 27 members including a core team fromDepartment of Education, and economists and managers from inside and outsidegovernment as well as the World Bank.Result-Although these discourses provided clear evidence about the effects of thepolicy choices of government and showed that school fee is a barrier to the rightto education for poor working-class communities, the goverment stayed stableabout a fee policy.
  • 9. How the participatory researches effect the policy?-Education Rights Projects (ERP) 2002. Result-worked closely with the social -these case studies showed that themovements. policy issues can not solve alone through education policy reform.-case studies- Durban Roodepoort Deepand Rondebult. Solution -is a broader and more purposeful-asserted the need for civil society to approach to social reform andaccess independent of government, and strategiesright to education. -require the-facilitate a social response to complex voice, knowledge, experience andpolicy issues. information gathered by locally- based social movements.-indentify real barriers to basic educationand deal with by meeting with localeducation officials.
  • 10. CONCLUSION POLICY, DISCOURSE, POWER AND RESISTANCE-In South Africa, in spite of the promise of apartheid reform, democraticaccountability still remains a serious problem.-Despite the new educational changing, inequity never disappears in SouthAfrica.-The effects of post-apartheid education still remain in South Africa and it isdifficult to remove them completely.-But it can be found solutions through engaging in participatory researcheswhich are based on the voices of the communities.

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