The role of trusted digital identity in enabling the eGovernment 2020 vision

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Whether we’re logging into eServices to perform healthcare claims,
to vote or sign a digital transaction,
pay taxes, book or buy goods or services,
our trusted digital identity will become ever more significant in the years to come.

This is especially true when it comes to accessing a vast range of public and government services.
In 2020 we’ll see our trusted digital identity become a key enabler of everyday life.
We’ll also use our digital identity
or a derivation of this root identity (eg. Mobile)
in a host of time-saving lifestyle applications. Everything from accessing tailored promotions
and special offers at the point of sale,
to signing digital contracts online or renting a car.

These new services will drive wealth creation across economies and provide the foundation for an explosion in the development and adoption of next-generation government eServices.
While eGovernment services are projected to deliver significant financial returns in 2020
(You can download the full eGov survey from www.secureidentityalliance.org)
There are more than just quantifiable benefits.
The opportunities for increasing convenience, trust and citizen satisfaction are significant
The wider benefits of the trusted digital identity framework as a key enabler of the wider digital economy should not be underestimated.
As providers of essential online services to the whole population,
governments can take the lead in promoting high value trust-based economic and social interactions online,
establishing a clear national policy strategy for digital identity management
that benefits all
and enables the creation of innovative online public and private services.
But if citizens are to benefit from a trusted digital identity
that can be used to securely access public and private services,
then a fully interoperable ecosystem needs to evolve to support secure and transparent data exchange between all parties:
citizens, public and private sectors.
From a technical standpoint,
the trust framework will require policies and standards that establish
what user information is accessible
which entity provide it - and gives citizens a degree of control over
what data they make available
It will also require an infrastructure
that facilitates and enables
trust and confidence between all members,
and delivers streamlined identity and data verification
based on summary digital credentials.
Enabling the kinds of eService returns that are projected is also dependent
on establishing the accountability and responsibilities of all who operate within the digital economy
as well as enabling full interoperability across the framework

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  • Whether we’re logging into eServices to perform healthcare claims, to vote or sign a digital transaction, pay taxes, book or buy goods or services, our digital identity will become ever more significant in the years to come. This is especially true when it comes to accessing a vast range of public and government services. In 2020 trusted digital identity will become a ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. We’ll use it every time we engage with our national governments – when we apply for benefits or pay our taxes. And when we vote online in national or municipal elections, our trusted digital identity will give us the permissions to do so.We’ll see our trusted digital identity become a key enabler of everyday life. Using a secure digital mailbox we’ll be able to communicate with government bodies, view and edit tax returns and submit clarifying questions to tax inspectors. We’ll even be able to use our identity to participate into a secure video chat with our doctor, or to collect a medical prescription.  Not only that, we’ll also use our digital identity or a derivation of this root identity (eg. Mobile) in a host of time-saving lifestyle applications. Everything from accessing tailored promotions and special offers at the point of purchase, to signing digital contracts online. We’ll even be able to use our mobile devices to unlock a rental car booked in our name or drive a shared car pool vehicle. These new services will drive wealth creation across economies as well as seeing new identity providers emerge to push the boundaries of what is possible today. Ultimately, our trusted identities will give us access to an exciting world of new on-line experiences, and provide the foundation for an explosion in the development and adoption of next-generation government eServices. There’s already a pent-up demand and appetite for both public and private eServices, fuelled by today’s digitally confident citizens who expect services to be available across all channels, the instant they need them. From simple identification processes like the electronic submission of photos to renew a driving license or passport to registering the birth of a child, there’s a growing public willingness to replace in-person procedures with online engagement and to give – or receive – information electronically. 
  • While eGovernment services are projected to deliver significant financial returns in 2020(You can download the full eGov survey from www.secureidentityalliance.org)
  • the opportunities for increasing convenience, trust and citizen satisfaction are significant
  • As well as stimulating the wider digital economy.The wider benefits of the trusted digital identity framework as a key enabler of the wider digital economy should not be underestimated. As providers of essential online services to the whole population, governments can take the lead in promoting high value trust-based economic and social interactions online, establishing a clear national policy strategy for digital identity management that benefits all and enables the creation of innovative online public and private services. And by acting as the national validation gateway for ID service providers, governments can help accelerate the wider digital economy.
  • From a citizen/consumer acceptance perspective, the take up of digital identity applications is heavily dependent on trust. How digital identity develops is an important concern; but if privacy controls and benefits are calibrated appropriately, people will be ready and willing to share personal data.So what does it take to turn the eGovernment – and wider digital economy – vision into a reality? The first step is to understand and follow the four guiding principles that underpin digital identity value creation, and then apply these to technology solutions:
  • But if citizens are to benefit comprehensively from a trusted digital identity that can be used to securely access public and private services, then a fully interoperable ecosystem needs to evolve to support secure and transparent data exchange between all parties – citizens, public and private sectors. From a technical standpoint the trust framework will require policies and standards that establish what user information is accessible which entity provide it and gives citizens a degree of control over what data they make available and the option of surrendering additional data for non-core services. It will also require an infrastructure that facilitates and enables trust and confidence between all members, and delivers streamlined identity and data verification based on summary digital credentials.Ultimately, enabling the kinds of eService returns that are projected is dependent on establishing the accountability and responsibilities of all who operate within the digital economy as well as enabling full interoperability across the framework 
  • Enabling this will require a trust framework that encompasses ID technology, authentication, application and interoperability alongside accountability, privacy and transparency and ID supply. All of which will be essential to generating citizen trust and a positive perception of the benefit/risk ratio to assure take-up.Many of these elements are already in place. Today’s card-reader based solutions are evolving towards smartcard-based secure electronic ID verification, and smartphones can now deliver electronic ID via standard contactless interfaces such as NFC (near field communications) and Bluetooth.  Meanwhile authentication technologies already support multi factor authentication processes such as PINS, usernames, passwords and/or OTA tokens – and biometrics will deliver a further authentication layer.
  • The question of where these identities are stored is crucial for obvious security reason and tamper resistance. The form factor of the electronic identity may vary but shall be stored or accessible using a secure element such as a smart card, a mobile UICC (SIM card), an embedded secure element in the mobile or a microSD card for example. eDocuments are able to authenticate the user based on access to appropriate levels of the root identity – offering only enough information to authenticate the transaction without revealing the details on which that identity is built. In this way privacy is served, and a greater level of user trust assured.
  • As we evolve towards the 2020 vision, context aware authentication will be required to determine the identification method (s) most appropriate to the user case in hand.
  • , in contrast to the limited scope of the services that operate today.
  • Model n°1 : a multi-channelIdentityframeworkbased on the National eID as a rootOman, UAEModel n°3 : a structuredIdentityframeworkunder a Federation of endorsedIdentity ProvidersSweden, Estonia, FinlandModel n°2 : an open Identitymarketwithoutany National schemeUK
  • Since 2001 the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has been engaged in building a competitive and resilient economy and today is acknowledged as having one of the most advanced eGovernments in the world. The ultimate objective of Emirates’ eGovernment strategy is to provide innovative channels in a time and cost effective manner – through the Internet, fixed and mobile phones and kiosks alongside traditional service centres. Citizens reap the benefits of efficient connectedness in their digital lives while UAE businesses can network, transact and interact to share knowledge and innovation. In South Korea, 90 per cent of all government interactions can now be performed online. As one of the most comprehensive, mature and high performance eGovernmentprogrammes in Asia, if not the world, Korea’s strategy integrates and coordinates responsive, efficient customer services, governance and policy making. Customised services for individuals and corporates, available via the Internet and mobile devices, have successfully eliminated 70 percent of all document requests. Meanwhile, the tiny state of Estonia – one of Europe’s smallest countries – has become an eGovernment role model with over 400 government services now fully integrated online. Full transparency has seen widespread positive acceptance of the eGovernment agenda by citizens. State issued ID smart cards unlock all the government’s eServices and allow Estonians to send and receive encrypted emails. In Estonia you can register your tax, vote in national elections, access e-health records or school reports – and even register your newborn child – online.
  • The role of trusted digital identity in enabling the eGovernment 2020 vision

    1. 1. The role of trusted digital identity in enabling the eGovernment 2020 vision Stephanie de Labriolle, Marketing & Communication Director, SIA Secure Identity Alliance – February 2014
    2. 2. Agenda Vision 2020 Motivations From vision to reality Bringing it all together The role of Secure Identity Alliance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 1
    3. 3. Vision 2020: Trusted digital identity is a key enabler of everyday life 8 Maintain personal information Update central govt. database with new home address 7 Digitally sign contract Sign contract online using trusted digital identity 6 Receive entitlement Get immediate cash reduction at supermarket checkout 5 Use as mobile key Unlock car from carsharing pool using trusted digital identity on mobile device February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis Communicate securely 1 Use secure digital mailbox for communication with government Trusted digital identity as center-piece of everyday life Consult physician online 2 Sign into secure video chat to remotely consult a physician Vote online 3 Electronically vote in city mayor election Edit tax report online 4 View tax report on tablet and send clarifying questions 2
    4. 4. Agenda Vision 2020 Motivations From vision to reality Bringing it all together The role of Secure Identity Alliance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 3
    5. 5. eGovernment yields $30–50B annual savings by 2020—enabled by trusted digital identity Annual eGovernment savings by 2020 ($B) Eastern Europe3 $2B Europe2 $18B $0.4B $8B Asia North America $19B $13B Oceania Africa $0.2B $0.1B $1.5B $0.7B $0.1B Savings potential Annual savings $1–2B $6B $0.5B South America1 $1B < $1B $10B Middle East $2B $2–10B $10–20B Minimum expected savings Note: Savings measured vs. 2011, include interactions between government and citizens (excluding businesses) 1. South America, Central America, Caribbean 2. Western Europe, Central Europe, Northern/Southern Europe 3. Eastern Europe incl. Russia Source: SIA; BCG analysis; Economist Intelligence Unit; UN eGovernment survey 2008-2012 February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis 4
    6. 6. There are substantial benefits of a trusted digital identity beyond the quantified potential Benefits for citizens Benefits for governments Increased convenience—services available 24/7 from everywhere Monetize by selling e-Documents to private organizations Faster processing lead times Enhance growth of digital economy by educating citizens and introducing a trusted digital identity as key enabler Increased transparency of processes Improved security of transactions  Higher process quality and citizen satisfaction Improved data basis for decision making through detailed transaction data February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis 5
    7. 7. Governments create digital economy value by introducing a trusted digital identity framework EU-27: Digital identity value1 2020 per sector (B$) Digital identity sectors Public sector 1 Public services/health2 Manufacturing industries 2 Traditional production 3 Retail 4 Financial services 5 Telco and media 6 Web 2.0 communities 7 eCommerce 8 Info/ entertainment Services industries Internet industry Frequency of trusted digital identity usage 522 95 53 1 130 1 31 53 305 197 February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 1. Combined value for organizations and consumers in EU-27 2. Large potential in public sector due to relatively low degree of digitization today Source: SIA; Liberty Global and BCG "The Value of Our Digital Identity" (2012) 6
    8. 8. Backup Governments create digital economy value by introducing a trusted digital identity framework Exemplary use cases for digital identity system Digital identity sectors Public sector 1 Public services/health Self-service, automation, personalized medicine, tax collection, digital signature Manufacturing industries 2 Traditional production Personalized products, consumer insight, subscription-based services 3 Retail Loyalty programs, marketing, service enhancements 4 Financial services 5 Telco and media Personalized services, monetization of consumer insight, marketing, automation 6 Web 2.0 communities Service enhancements, monetization of user-generated content, marketing 7 eCommerce Secure transaction, monetizing consumer insight, marketing, fraud prevention 8 Info/ entertainment Frequency of trusted digital identity usage Personalized products, monetization of consumer insight, marketing Services industries Internet industry 1 Automization, personalized products, risk management, secure transaction 1 February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; Liberty Global and BCG "The Value of Our Digital Identity" (2012) 7
    9. 9. Agenda Vision 2020 Motivations From vision to reality Bringing it all together The role of Secure Identity Alliance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 10
    10. 10. Guiding principles for digital identity value creation …  Provide options for control regarding data sharing Privacy Transparency Responsibility Benefits February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; Liberty Global and BCG "The Value of Our Digital Identity" (2012)  Take accountability for a trusted flow of data  Increase data security in order to safeguard digital identity  Communicate benefits and engage users for sustainable data usage 11
    11. 11. ... and how they apply for trusted identification solutions Implications for trusted digital identity  "Privacy by design"  Dashboard that allows citizens to Privacy change usage rights and to define standard profiles for data usage  Organizations using the system Transparency have to comply to a codex for how they treat and use personal data  Any misuse will also impact secure identity providers' reputation  Highest degree of protection incl. Responsibility the processes of organizations  Trace misuse and hold offenders accountable  Communication of the secure Benefits February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; Liberty Global and BCG "The Value of Our Digital Identity" (2012) identification solution focuses on enabled use cases rather than product features 12
    12. 12. Backup Trust frameworks enable widespread realization of benefits 4 Accountability What is a trust framework? Technically ...  A set of policies, standards, taxonomy and infrastructure that facilitates and enables trust and confidence between members Trust framework • Governance • Agreed standards • Business process, technical capabilities Members/participants in the trust framework February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis ... but more importantly ...  A way to unlock better, harmonised service delivery across government (and beyond) to better respond to the needs of customers  A way to take advantage of the opportunities of the emerging digital economy ... and practically ...  Enhanced discoverability  Summary digital credential  "Tell us once"  Information re-use/pre-filling  Streamlined identity and data verification  Central location for info. and communication (e.g., digital inboxes, vaults) 13
    13. 13. Framework to discuss trusted digital identity use cases and product evolution towards 2020 vision Future Physical ID, no online access 1 ID derivation and/or wireless solutions ID technology Single-factor authentication 2 Mostly card-reader based solutions Two-factor authentication Context-sensitive multifactor authentication Authentication Limited scope of services available Terms of service 5 6 User has choice and transparency Government as single ID supplier 4 Trust framework "Take it or leave it" 3 Broad service range across jurisdictions and sectors Mostly market-based system1 with multiple ID suppliers Applicability and interoperability Accountability Privacy and transparency Supply of IDs Status quo case February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 1. Some countries (e.g., with small population and already established eGov infrastructure) may still opt for a government supply model Source: SIA; BCG analysis Future case 14
    14. 14. Backup Future ID technology will be based on smartcards and ID derivation method 1 ID technology Smartcard-based eID Disadvantages Advantages Description  Smartcard-based eID securely stores personal ID information  Devices (e.g., smartphones) access eID card via standard interface (e.g., NFC)  Authentication on device via available methods (see part 2 of framework)  Secure storage of personal ID on smartcard  Direct control over personal identity and eID derivation  "Root ID" held in secure document  Additional IDs derived from root ID for end user devices and stored either locally (phone SIM, TEE1, etc.) or in cloud  Authentication on device via available methods (see part 2 of framework)  Maximum mobility  Inherent compatibility across devices data  Requires standardized contactless communication interface (NFC, lowpower Bluetooth, or other)  Lower flexibility compared to option 2 February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 1. Trusted Execution Environment Source: SIA; BCG analysis  Highest convenience level can be achieved through cloud-based storage of eIDs, which may be less secure than local storage in a secure document 15
    15. 15. Backup Context-sensitive multi-factor ID breaks the compromise between convenience and security 2 Authentication Future ID methods break today's compromise of security vs. convenience Convenience Identification method depends on device type and features  Biometric sensor (e.g., fingerprint, face, voice)  Non-biometric (e.g., PIN, TAN1, password) Future methods break this compromise and offer convenient authentication at all security levels Future Traditionally, convenience decreases with added security as authentication becomes more cumbersome Future ID optimizes security, convenience, and cost through context awareness Identification method depends on security requirements of use case  Simple authentication for lowstake applications (e.g., small payments)  Multi-factor authentication for high stake applications (e.g., access health records) Today Security Identification method is economical  Most economical ID solution is chosen for particular situation and application Convenience and security can go hand in hand in next-generation identification methods February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 1. Transaction Authentication Number Source: SIA; BCG analysis 16
    16. 16. Backup Today, trusted digital identities often limited to few use cases, preventing a broader adoption 3 Applicability and interoperability Today: Mostly non-compatible systems, each requiring separate access ID Multiple jurisdictions Future: Fully interoperable ecosystem, accessible by a trusted digital identity Public Public authorities Public authorities sector Social security Public Public Sector Public Sector sector Social security Registry Social security Registry Taxes Registry Taxes Automobile Taxes Automobile Visa Automobile Visa Buildings Visa Police Buildings Buildings Police Health Police Health Health Secure, standardized data exchange and identity federation Citizens … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … Multiple … IDs— … one per service … … … … … … … … … … … … February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis Trusted digital identity 2 Citizens Private sector Private sector Public services/health Traditional production Retail Financial service Telco and media Web 2.0 communities eCommerce Info/entertainment 1 1 Data exchange allows parties to share information in a convenient, yet secure and transparent way • Increases data richness for decision making • Reduces volume of (manual) data requests • Facilitates information maintenance, as each type of information is stored in one database only • Single sign-in enabled by identity federation 2 Trusted digital identity can be used by citizens to securely access public and private services 17
    17. 17. Backup Privacy and transparency are important pillars of a successful eGov implementation 5 Privacy and transparency Information richness and degree of sharing correlate with eGov usefulness Richness of available data determines type and quality of applications  Use case feasibility depends on certain set of data  Quality and automation of decision making increases with data richness Data sharing enables efficiency gains  Sharing enables each set of data to be stored in one place only, without duplicates • Maintenance of data is facilitated • Data on average is more accurate  Sharing reduces data requests as system feeds itself There are substantial benefits in generating citizen trust in the system  Implementation success based on a positive perception of benefit-risk ratio  Speed of digitization depends on public acceptance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis Relentless focus on transparency and user control required for citizen trust Transparency Make data usage highly transparent  Type of information stored and rationale for storage  Access rights and access log  Legal framework for data use User control Give users degree of control  Make trade-offs regarding service availability explicit  Give user choice to surrender more data for non-core services Independent audits Generate credibility via regular audits  Help discover and eliminate system weaknesses  Additional credibility from third-party assessment 18
    18. 18. Backup e-Documents can be supplied by governments and/or private organizations 6 Supply of IDs Starting point for most countries Government as single supplier of eIDs Many countries will move to a mixed supply in the medium- to long-term future eID supply by government and private organizations Some countries may opt for a full market-based solution eID supply only by private organizations Risks Highest trust level in e-Documents  Could lead to increased innovation  Could lead to increased innovation  Direct and full control    Leverage of existing govt. infrastructure possible Could save cost if designed well Could save cost if designed well  Benefits  Potentially less cost effective   Need to actively ensure trust  Potentially less innovative Need to ensure sufficient trust   Need to manage compatibility Risk of e-Document proliferation and resulting compatibility issues  Increased coordination effort  Sufficient market size required to make it attractive for companies Choice of e-Document supply model depends on local conditions and preferences February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis 19
    19. 19. Agenda Vision 2020 Motivations From vision to reality Bringing it all together The role of Secure Identity Alliance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 20
    20. 20. Examples—governments are actively pushing eGov improvements with digital service delivery February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis 21
    21. 21. Different models implemented by Governments as a result of cultural, legal and political influences Model 1, National eID as a Root : a multi-channel Identity framework based on the National eID as a root Model 2, a structured Identity framework under a Federation of endorsed Identity Providers Model 3, Open Identity framework without any National scheme February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 22
    22. 22. Examples of successful eGov implementations pave the way for other countries Examples: UAE, South Korea, Estonia … … UAE South Korea Estonia Single entry Interoperable strategy Mobile strategy Business collab. Data exchange E-vote Open Data eParticipation Legal innovation Process innovation Everyday use Transparency Highlights  Success story Focused eGovernment effort since 2001, today one of the most advanced eGovernments  Detailed eGovernment strategy outlining priorities until 2021  ~ 90% of govt. interactions can be performed online today  ~ 400 government services fully integrated, more to follow  Improved data use eliminated ~ 70% of civil document requests  Great acceptance by the public Cumulative worldwide eGov experience to guide a successful implementation in other countries February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG analysis; governments of UAE, South Korea and Estonia 23
    23. 23. Successful eGov implementations follow five key principles 1 2 Benefits and communication  Prioritize service digitization by expected benefit Technology and infrastructure  Explicitly communicate benefits to relevant parties  Ensure availability of trusted digital identity technology  Use performance-based program mgmt. with clear goals, objectives, shortand long-term plans and deadlines  Enforce technology and data standards for interoperability  Ensure wide availability of Internet in sufficient quality for eGov access  Central steering and commitment Incentivize use of eGov solutions  Showcase successful examples  3 Legal and process innovation  5  View eGov introduction as an administrative step change, creating opportunities for large-scale change  Create fast track for passing eGov-related laws in order to keep momentum Central eGov agency for day-to-day project management 4 Transparency  Set up portal website for citizens to view their data and its use  Regularly report on digitization effort, detailing successes, and additional improvement opportunities  Conduct regular third-party audits to verify effectiveness and security Adjust government processes to reflect new reality of digital environment  Chief Information Officer with end-to-end eGov responsibility February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov Source: SIA; BCG experience 24
    24. 24. Agenda Vision 2020 Motivations From vision to reality Bringing it all together The role of Secure Identity Alliance February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 25
    25. 25. About the Secure Identity Alliance • The Secure Identity Alliance is committed to helping public bodies across the world deliver e-government services to citizens through the widespread adoption of secure e-document technologies. • Founded in March 2013 by leading e-Document and e-Service Companies • Members at date: February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 26
    26. 26. Its Objectives Accelerate the transition to smart eDocuments to support an open, interoperable and efficient roll-out of eGovernment online services by:  Describe and promote use cases of convenient value-added eGovernment services  Share experiences and best practices between industry and governments modernizing their services, in particular towards ensuring the privacy of end-users’ personal information  Promote standardization of relevant and appropriate industry specifications  Make recommendations on the most up-to-date means to properly address the governments identity and privacy challenges • eDocument hardware, software and secure printing technologies, materials and physical security expertise • Deliver the level of confidence and assurance needed for the rapid adoption of eServices that can be trusted by citizens  Provide consistent reference information on security, identity and privacy challenges in a transparent manner In short, the Secure Identity Alliance offers a trusted partner for governments when defining their eDocument strategies and implementing associated eGovernment services. February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 27
    27. 27. What makes the work of SIA unique SIA is a global organization whose Members are leaders in the provision of secure identity SIA has a free ‘Advisory Observer’ membership opened to Governement Agencies willing to contribute and influence the work of the Alliance SIA Members cover the full lifecycle of secure documents from design and manufacture through to their use for eServices in the field SIA’s expertise is built through its collective heritage and knowledge SIA is a trusted partner: making recommendations for the interest of governments and citizens/ non profit February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 28
    28. 28. Interested to participate? contact the Secretary General or the Marketing Director:  Jean-Claude Perrin at jean- claude.perrin@secureidentityalliance.org  Stéphanie de Labriolle at stephanie.delabriolle@secureidentityalliance.org www.secureidentityalliance.org February 2014 – Trusted Digital Identity for eGov 29

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