Increasing Washington’s International Competiveness Through Policy Seattle Propeller Club January 18, 2012
About WCIT The Washington Council on International Trade is dedicated to growing our state's economy through public polici...
The Role of WCIT <ul><li>Educate Washington’s elected officials about trade policy issues that impact Washington’s interna...
What is Trade? <ul><li>All International Business is International Trade </li></ul><ul><li>Aerospace & Manufacturing </li>...
Why Exports Matter <ul><li>$53 billion in 2010 from commodities (Supports at least 1 in 4 jobs in WA) </li></ul><ul><li>Es...
Why Imports Matter <ul><li>$80 billion in 2010 from commodities </li></ul><ul><li>250,000 state jobs supported by WA ports...
Trans-Pacific Partnership  Regional Trade Agreement <ul><li>Asia-Pacific regional trade agreement being negotiated by the ...
Russia MFN Approval <ul><li>Russia is the world’s 10th largest market with a large middle class consumer base, but it is o...
Harbor Maintenance Tax  “Land Border Loophole” <ul><li>The Harbor Maintenance Tax (HMT) is a federal tax imposed on shippe...
Affordable Footwear Act and the US OUTDOOR Act <ul><li>AFA would eliminate most shoe import tariffs ; US OUTDOOR Act would...
Increased International Visitors Through Travel Visa Reform <ul><li>The current U.S. visa application process is a huge ba...
Increased U.S. Competitiveness in Trade with China  <ul><li>China is Washington state’s top trading partner, and the desti...
Other Potential Policy Issues <ul><li>Federal Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Export-Import Bank reauthorization </li></ul><ul><l...
How Many WA Jobs Are Tied to Trade?
Questions? www.wcit.org @WashingtonTrade [email_address] 206.389.7273
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Increasing washington's international competitiveness

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The Washington Council on International Trade (WCIT) is dedicated to growing our state's economy through public policies favorable to expanded opportunities in the global marketplace. WCIT members are farmers, manufacturers, retailers, service providers, non-profit organizations and individuals who support a strong trade policy that benefits Washington’s small, medium and large companies and creates jobs for Washington residents.

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Increasing washington's international competitiveness

  1. 1. Increasing Washington’s International Competiveness Through Policy Seattle Propeller Club January 18, 2012
  2. 2. About WCIT The Washington Council on International Trade is dedicated to growing our state's economy through public policies favorable to expanded opportunities in the global marketplace. WCIT members are farmers, manufacturers, retailers, service providers, non-profit organizations and individuals who support a strong trade policy that benefits Washington’s small, medium and large companies and creates jobs for Washington residents.
  3. 3. The Role of WCIT <ul><li>Educate Washington’s elected officials about trade policy issues that impact Washington’s international economic competitiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Engage the business community and others in actively supporting policy changes that increase Washington’s international economic competitiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Serve as a repository of data and information on international trade in Washington. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What is Trade? <ul><li>All International Business is International Trade </li></ul><ul><li>Aerospace & Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Agriculture </li></ul><ul><li>IT </li></ul><ul><li>Retail </li></ul><ul><li>Professional Services </li></ul><ul><li>Global Health </li></ul><ul><li>Int’l Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Int’l Education </li></ul>
  5. 5. Why Exports Matter <ul><li>$53 billion in 2010 from commodities (Supports at least 1 in 4 jobs in WA) </li></ul><ul><li>Estimated $30+ billion in services exports </li></ul><ul><li>95% of consumers are outside the U.S </li></ul><ul><li>90% of exporting companies are SMEs </li></ul><ul><li>WA ports handle 7% of U.S exports & WA is the 5 th largest commodity exporting state (behind Texas, California, Florida and New York) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Why Imports Matter <ul><li>$80 billion in 2010 from commodities </li></ul><ul><li>250,000 state jobs supported by WA ports </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign direct investment employs 91,200 Washington workers </li></ul><ul><li>Increased supply chain competitiveness for Washington’s retailers and manufacturers </li></ul><ul><li>Increased capacity for exports </li></ul>
  7. 7. Trans-Pacific Partnership Regional Trade Agreement <ul><li>Asia-Pacific regional trade agreement being negotiated by the United States, Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam. </li></ul><ul><li>Asia-Pacific region is the largest market for U.S. exports (including 2/3 of U.S. agricultural exports). In 2009, 64% of Washington exports went to Asia-Pacific countries. </li></ul><ul><li>TPP could serve as a framework into which other Asia-Pacific countries might eventually enter. (Japan, Canada, Mexico and South Korea have already expressed interest.) </li></ul>
  8. 8. Russia MFN Approval <ul><li>Russia is the world’s 10th largest market with a large middle class consumer base, but it is only the United States’ 37th largest trading partner. </li></ul><ul><li>Washington is one of the top 10 states in the country in terms of exports to Russia; in the first half of 2011, Washington’s exports to Russia grew 191% over the same period in 2010, while the state’s exports to the world increased by only 21%. </li></ul><ul><li>United States must approve “permanent normal trade relations” (PNTR) status with Russia to take advantage of this market opportunity (because of Jackson-Vanik). </li></ul>
  9. 9. Harbor Maintenance Tax “Land Border Loophole” <ul><li>The Harbor Maintenance Tax (HMT) is a federal tax imposed on shippers based on the value of the goods being shipped through ports. </li></ul><ul><li>HMT’s “land border loophole”: tax is not assessed on importers who route cargo through non-U.S. ports and then move their cargo into U.S. markets by land. </li></ul><ul><li>The “land border loophole” makes it cheaper for international importers to divert cargo to non-U.S. ports, such as those in British Columbia, to avoid the HMT in Washington. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Affordable Footwear Act and the US OUTDOOR Act <ul><li>AFA would eliminate most shoe import tariffs ; US OUTDOOR Act would eliminate disproportionately high tariffs on “recreational performance outerwear.” </li></ul><ul><li>These tariffs were originally implemented to protect domestic industries that no longer exist, which means the only impact of these tariffs today is to make these products more expensive for U.S. consumers. </li></ul><ul><li>Washington is home to a significant number of retailers that import footwear and performance outerwear: REI, Amazon, Nordstrom, Brooks Sports and Eddie Bauer. Senators Murray and Cantwell are co-sponsors of the AFA, and Representative Reichert introduced the House version of the US OUTDOOR Act. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Increased International Visitors Through Travel Visa Reform <ul><li>The current U.S. visa application process is a huge barrier to trade with some of the world’s fastest growing markets, such as China, India and Brazil. </li></ul><ul><li>A visa application can take as long as 145 days in Brazil and 120 days in China. As a result, the United States welcomed the same number of travelers in 2010 as it did in 2000. </li></ul><ul><li>The United States would have welcomed 78 million more visitors – generating $606 billion in spending and 467,000 jobs – if our country had simply kept its historical share of world travel growth. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Increased U.S. Competitiveness in Trade with China <ul><li>China is Washington state’s top trading partner, and the destination of over 19% of Washington’s exports in 2010. These figures don’t capture the economic impact of the global supply chain relationships, nor the new Chinese joint ventures being developed by a diverse mix of Washington goods and services firms. </li></ul><ul><li>US & China have an increasingly successful and productive relationship, yet significant room for progress remains – from disagreements over currency valuation to improved intellectual property rights protections. </li></ul><ul><li>Rather than efforts to &quot;punish&quot; China through retaliatory tariffs, the best way to achieve a sustainable, competitive U.S.-China trade relationship is through enforcement of existing rules along with engagement toward mutually beneficial changes. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Other Potential Policy Issues <ul><li>Federal Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Export-Import Bank reauthorization </li></ul><ul><li>Export controls reform </li></ul><ul><li>Investment in freight mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Increased bilateral trade with the EU </li></ul><ul><li>State Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Investment in freight mobility </li></ul><ul><li>State Commerce & Agriculture foreign sales promotion </li></ul><ul><li>International Marketing budget (tourism, FDI) </li></ul>
  14. 14. How Many WA Jobs Are Tied to Trade?
  15. 15. Questions? www.wcit.org @WashingtonTrade [email_address] 206.389.7273

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