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Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
Robert smithson
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Robert smithson

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  1. Robert Smithson <ul><li>Robert Smithson (January 2, 1938 - July 20, 1973) was an American artist famous for his land art . </li></ul><ul><li>Smithson was born in Passaic, New Jersey and studied painting and drawing in New York City at the Art Students League. His early exhibited artworks were collage works influenced by &quot; homoerotic drawings and clippings from beefcake magazines &quot; ( New York Times 06.24.05), science fiction , and early Pop Art . He primarily identified himself as a painter during this time, but after a three year rest from the art world, Smithson emerged in 1964 as a proponent of the then-fashionable minimalism . His new work abandoned the preoccupation with the body that had been common in his earlier work. Instead he began to use glass sheet and neon lighting tubes to explore visual refraction and mirroring, in particular the sculpture Enantiomorphic Chambers . Crystalline structures and the concept of entropy became of particular interest to him, and informed a number of sculptures completed during this period, including Alogon 2 . Smithson became affiliated with artists who were identified with the minimalist or Primary Structures movement, such as Nancy Holt (whom he married), Robert Morris and Sol Lewitt </li></ul>
  2. Spiral Jetty 1970 <ul><li>The journeys he undertook were central to his practice as an artist, and his non-site sculptures often included maps and aerial photos of a particular location, as well as the geological artifacts displaced from those sites. </li></ul><ul><li>His most famous work is Spiral Jetty (1970), a 1500-feet long spiral-shaped jetty extending into the Great Salt Lake in Utah constructed from rocks, earth, salt and red algae . It was entirely submerged by rising lake waters for several years, but has since re-emerged. </li></ul>
  3. Robert Smithson Other theoretical writings explore the relationship of a piece of art to its environment, from which he developed his concept of sites and non-sites . A site was a work located in a specific outdoor location, while a non-site was a work which could be displayed in any suitable space, such as an art gallery . Spiral Jetty is an example of a sited work, while Smithson's non-site pieces frequently consist of photographs of a particular location, often exhibited alongside some material (such as stones or soil) removed from that location. Sited and non-site
  4. <ul><li>In 1967 Smithson began exploring industrial areas around New Jersey and was fascinated by the sight of dump trucks excavating tons of earth and rock that he described in an essay as the equivalents of the monuments of antiquity. This resulted in the series of 'non-sites' in which earth and rocks collected from a specific area are installed in the gallery as sculptures, often combined with mirrors or glass. In September 1968, Smithson published the essay &quot;A Sedimentation of the Mind: Earth Projects&quot; in Artforum that promoted the work of the first wave of land art artist and in 1969 he began producing land art pieces to further explore concepts of entropy gained from his readings of William S. Burroughs and J.G. Ballard </li></ul>
  5. Mirror sites
  6. Non-site sculpture
  7. sites Mirror Yucatan
  8. Photoworks
  9. Drawings
  10. Drawings islands
  11. Floating sculpture
  12.  
  13. Drawings
  14. Partially Buried Woodshed <ul><li>In 1970 at Kent State University , Smithson created Partially Buried Woodshed to illustrate geographical time consuming human history. </li></ul>
  15. Walter De Maria <ul><li>De Maria emerged as a leader of the Earthworks movement in 1968 when he filled the Galerie Heiner Friedrich in Munich with dirt. This year, he also made his The Mile Long Drawing in the Desert in the Mojave Desert for Walls in the Desert, a project, originally conceived in 1962, which is to consist of two parallel mile-long walls. In 1968, he also participated in Documenta in Kassel. A major exhibition of De Maria’s sculpture was held at the Kunstmuseum Basel in 1972. Earthworks and serial geometric sculpture continue to occupy De Maria in the 1970s: his Three Continent Project was completed in 1972 and the Lightning Field in New Mexico was finished in 1977. That same year, De Maria recreated his Earth Room at the Heiner Friedrich Gallery in New York. The artist lives in New York. </li></ul>
  16. <ul><li>Walter De maria </li></ul><ul><li>The Lightning Field , 1977, by the American sculptor Walter De Maria, is a work of Land Art situated in a remote area of the high desert of southwestern New Mexico. It is comprised of 400 polished stainless steel poles installed in a grid array measuring one mile by one kilometer. The poles—two inches in diameter and averaging 20 feet and 7½ inches in height—are spaced 220 feet apart and have solid pointed tips that define a horizontal plane. A sculpture to be walked in as well as viewed, The Lightning Field is intended to be experienced over an extended period of time, and visitors are encouraged to spend as much time as possible in it alone, especially during sunset and sunrise. In order to provide this opportunity, Dia offers overnight visits during the months of May through October. </li></ul>
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