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Frank Lloyd Wright

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    Frank Lloyd Wright Frank Lloyd Wright Presentation Transcript

    • Frank Lloyd Wright 1867-1959
    • The Prairie Style is characterized by strong horizontal lines like those of this Frank Lloyd Wright house in Oak Park, IL
      • Frank Lloyd Wright moved to Oak Park in 1889, finding it an ideal place for an ambitious young architect to raise a family. In 1893, after a dispute with his mentor, Louis Sullivan, Wright opened his own studio in Oak Park. Some of this town's wealthy residents were among his first clients.
      • By 1909 , when he left Oak Park, Wright had completed over
      • one hundred fifty commissions and had been a pioneer in a uniquely American style of architecture.
    • Prairie Style: • Strong Horizontal Lines • Cantilevered projections • Wide, over-sized eaves •A Belt-course between stories • Bank of Windows and Clerestory • " Hidden" entrances • low hipped roof Unlike the ostentatious Victorian house, the Prairie Style house was conspicuously lacking in ornamentation . A variety of geometric shapes and forms inspired by nature were highlighted through window arrangement, columns, low walls and planters, creating a visually appealing home.
    • Bank of Windows and Clerestory
    • • Wide, over-sized eaves •A Belt-course between storey
    • Cantilevered projections
    • • " Hidden" entrances
    • • low hipped roof
    • The stained glass windows or "art glass" were integral to this complex. The lines of these windows are ruler straight, a design element embraced by Wright as he thought curves were representative of decadent decoration.
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      • www.dana-thomas.org/
    • Frank Lloyd Wright In 1904 Wright built his first major public work, an administrative building for the Larkin Mail Order Co. of Buffalo, New York. The Larkin Building was one of two projects Wright designed that year for Darwin D. Martin, the company’s entrepreneurial owner (the other project, the Martin House , is one of Wright’s most elaborate Prairie Style designs). The Larkin embodies Wright’s vision of productive labor as a cornerstone of the social contract: its central space is filled with an almost ecclesiastical light, and ringed with inscriptions extolling the value of labor. The Larkin Building was demolished in 1950
    • Larkin Building 1904 The Larkin Building was demolished in 1950
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    • Prairie Style: Martin House It was a distinctively Midwestern house, with most (but not all) examples found in that region. The Prairie Style began in 1900 and peaked around 1915 . After World War I, the pendulum of architectural tastes swung back to old favorites and revival styles became popular.
    • • Windows, Doors, Furniture, Lamp Fixtures
      • The stained glass windows or "art glass" were integral to this complex. The lines of these windows are ruler straight, a design element embraced by Wright as he thought curves were representative of decadent decoration.
      • Wright called his windows "light screens" and considered them part of the walls, not merely holes in the walls. The windows were used to create textural changes within the rooms and to control the eye and shape its vision. In Wrightian homes windows were used to create subdued illumination or a "moonlight effect". Colors and stains were carefully chosen to emit more or less light and Wright often used opaque or iridescent glass for variety and interest.
      • Above all Wright believed his windows were an integral part of his overall design and were meant to be appreciated as works of art and most definitely not to be covered with heavy draperies.
    • " light screens " Geometry in Nature
    • Furniture
    • Lamp Fixtures
    • Frank Llyod Wright
    • Frank Llyod Wright
    • Frank Llyod Wright