Independent Enrichment Projects

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This slideshow is intended for teachers who are looking to effectively embed project menus and/or independent contract learning into their classrooms.

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Independent Enrichment Projects

  1. 1. A Pathway to Differentiation: Sean M. Hildebrandt Sean M. Hildebrandt Secondary High Potential Specialist Secondary High Potential SpecialistEmail: shildebr@shakopee.k12.mn.usEmail: shildebr@shakopee.k12.mn.us Phone: (952) 496 --5768 Phone: (952) 496 5768
  2. 2. Differentiation is a teacher’sresponse to learner needsshaped by mindset andguided by general principles.Teachers can differentiatethrough content, process, orproduct according tostudents’ readiness, interest,or learning profile.- Carol Ann Tomlinson (1999)
  3. 3. Definition: a differentiationstrategy used with studentswho have already masteredthe skills or content to betaughtTwo avenues can be taken tocompact curriculum: •Acceleration •Enrichment
  4. 4. An valid pre-assessment has been designed and administered to classStudents have mastered 80% of the content before the unit has even begun!Student and parentsand/or guardian agree
  5. 5. Research suggests that project basedlearning is more effective thantraditional instruction:be more effective than traditional instructionfor preparing students to integrate and explainconcepts. (Capon & Kuhn, 2004)in increasing academic achievement on annualstate-administered assessment tests (Geier et.al., 2008)long-term retention, skill development andsatisfaction of students and teachers (Strobel &van Barneveld, 2008)
  6. 6. Revisit Student LearnerProfiles. They can help youbuild appropriate andengaging enrichment projects.Each individual has a uniqueLearner Profile consisting of:  Personal Interests  Individual Aptitudes  Multiple Intelligences  Learning Styles
  7. 7. Select one or two literacy and content standards to addressConsider whether thisproject will serve as thesummative assessment orprepare student for thesummative assessment.
  8. 8. Bloom’s Hierarch wereupdated in the mid 90’s tobetter incorporate 21stCentury thinking skills:Projects can bedesigned to intentionallyaddress specific levels ofthinking.
  9. 9. Visual (29%): embracepictures, videos, graphics,diagrams, charts, modelsAuditory (34%) embracelectures, recordings, storytelling,music, verbalization, questioningKinesthetic (37%) embraceacting, role-play, clay modeling
  10. 10. Run Bloom’s Levels across the top and Learning styles down.
  11. 11. Define ExpectationsLearning ConditionsWorking ConditionsEvaluation MethodsTimeline
  12. 12. Geier, R., Blumenfeld, P.C., Marx, R.W., Krajcik, J.S., Fishman, B., Soloway, E., & Clay-Chambers, J. (2008). Standardized test outcomes for students engaged in inquiry-basedscience curricula in the context of urban reform. Journal of Research in Science Teaching,45(8), 922-939Strobel, J. & van Barneveld, A. (2008) "When is PBL More Effective? A Meta-synthesis ofMeta-analyses Comparing PBL to Conventional Classrooms," Interdisciplinary Journal ofProblem-based Learning, 3(1), 44-58. Retrieved fromhttp://docs.lib.purdue.edu/ijpbl/vol3/iss1/4.Capon, N, & Kuhn, D. (2004). What’s so good about problem-based learning? Cognition andInstruction, 22, 61-79.Miller, P. (2001). Learning styles: The multimedia of the mind. ED 451340.

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