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Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
Differentiating a Lesson Plan
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Differentiating a Lesson Plan

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This slideshow is part of the series: A Pathway to Differentiation. It is a professional growth opportunity designed for the secondary teaching staff of Shakopee Public Schools.

This slideshow is part of the series: A Pathway to Differentiation. It is a professional growth opportunity designed for the secondary teaching staff of Shakopee Public Schools.

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  • 1. A Pathway to Differentiation: Differentiating a Lesson Plan Sean M. Hildebrandt Secondary High Potential Specialist Shakopee Public Schools Shakopee, MN 55379 Phone: (952) 496-5768 Email: shildebr@shakopee.k12.mn.us
  • 2. oTeachers teach better when they systematically study their students (Souza & Tomlinson, 2011) to create differentiated, learner- centered classrooms.oDifferentiated instruction increases stimulation by responding to students’: Readiness Interests and/or Individual learning profilesoBrain studies suggest stimulating environments maximize learning (Rao, 2010; Shaw, 2006)
  • 3. Differentiation is a teacher’sresponse to learner needsshaped by mindset andguided by general principles.Teachers can differentiatethrough content, process, orproduct according tostudents’readiness, interest, orlearning profile.- Carol Ann Tomlinson (1999)
  • 4. Consider the Content & Literacystandard(s) being addressed. Will allstudents learn the same material?(Content)Consider the students ability levels.Can you teach the material in the sameway to all students? (Process)Consider the assessments. How willstudents demonstrate mastery?(Pre/Form/Sum & Product)
  • 5. Consider the physicalenvironment. What conditionsare needed for the lesson?Consider classroom behaviors.Will affective issues interrupt thelesson?Consider materials available.Will materials force changes in theprocess?
  • 6. What is being taught? Select the common core (literacy/content) standards to addressPre-assess to identify students prior knowledge baseDesign flexible opportunities via: Alternative mini-lessons Enrichment projects Accelerate curriculumTools: Learning contracts, curriculum compactor, richer & deeper text
  • 7. Process: How the students are taught.Plan varied activities based on: Readiness: matching complexity of a task to students level of skill and understanding Interest: give topic choices so that students make personal connections to a specified goal. Learning profile: match activity to student’s identified learning modality or interest, or intelligence preference. Bloom’s New Taxonomy
  • 8. Product: How the demonstrate content or skill mastery. Design project menus that take student interests & learning preferences into account Tools: Tic-Tac-Toe menus & project matrixesideabackpack.blogspot.com
  • 9. Differentiation & the Brain: How Neuroscience Supports the Learner Friendly Classroom, David A. Sousa & Carol A. Tomlinson. (2011).Shaw, P., Greenstein, D., Lerch, J., Clasen, I., Lenroot, R., Gogtay, N., et al. (2006). Intellectual ability and cortical development in children and adolescents. Nature, 440, 676-679.Rao, H., Betancourt, L., Giannetta, J. M., Brodsky, N. L., Korczykowski, M., Avants, B. B., et al. (2010). Early parental care is important for hippocampal maturation: Evidence from brain morphology in humans. Neurolmage, 49, 1144-1150.

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