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American Society for Quality - Employee Engagement Presentation

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Employee Engagement : Moving the Needle on Quality …

Employee Engagement : Moving the Needle on Quality

This lecture is designed to demonstrate how engaged employees positively impact quality. Sean will expand on how employees become engaged and stay engaged. He will use statistics to identify how engaged employees impact quality results and processes. All audience members will be equipped with talent solutions that they can immediately implement in their workplace to impact the organization’s human capital results and their quality-related bottom line performance.

Session Description:

TalentMap’s proven Best Practices are shared and elaborated on. What has TalentMap heard employees/employers from hundreds of corporations share with us? What do they need and want to become and stay engaged employees? How have the engagement elements been impacted by quality programs and implementation plans put in place by corporations? These questions and many more are addressed when Sean Fitzpatrick shares ideas, approaches and business practices on employee engagement and how it impacts corporate culture and quality. We will address:

-Statistics from TalentMap’s extensive database that identify how engaged employees improve on quality

-What TalentMap has learned and heard from employees when surveying their corporate culture that impacts quality

-How to implement action plans with accountabilities from an engagement survey

Once you have surveyed identify how you work on making the changes that will impact your corporate engagement levels:

-what are the quick wins

- plan for the strategic gains

- looking at impact vs. cost

- how you deliver what you have promised

- importance of measuring your programs

- who should be involved in the planning,delivery and implementation

Our Client will then address what they have experienced, learned and implemented on during and after their Employee Engagement survey. Once you have all the data and information how do you set priorities, how do you roll them out, who implements and how do you measure success, how you get the buy-in in a unionized environment?

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  • Well, we as a civilization have had the Stone Age. The Bronze Age. The Iron Age. The Industrial Age.The Space Age. The Age of Aquarius. The Information Age.It’s taken us several centuries but the world is finally recognizing one simple fact: WE NEED HUMANS. That’s why we here at TalentMap believe that this is the HUMAN AGE.All over the world, access to talent is replacing access to capital as the absolute #1 key competitive differentiator. The bottom line: Companies that have talent will win. Those that don’t, won’t. It’s that simple.And the absolute #1 way to make sure that your organization is the one with the talent? ENGAGEMENT.
  • 30 years ago we did not expect much out of a job, - other than payWe did not expect it to get much meeting out of workWe did not expect to have much control over how work gets doneWe did not expect to use our natural talents and skills
  • IN the past 30 year al lot has change with respect to meaning and work, incidentally around 1975 around the time this book first came out In 1970 only 23 % expected to get work that was meaning full, today that % has tripled in the 67% would state that the work I do is meaningfulThe same with how work gets does and the expectation around using our natural and talents have changesWe expect a lot more out of work that we did 30 years ago.
  • New Generation have different expectations
  • Other things are changing:Communication tools have/change we expect companies organizations and institution to be more transparent, to talk, to dialogue, not to be spoken to
  • ExampleFirefox CEO fired over employee uprisingAnalysis and are looking at Glassdoor to predict growthBrendan Eich, Mozilla CEO, resigns after protests over anti-gay marriage stance
  • Another example of Positive Employee Activism1 in 5 (draw visibility to their organizations or defend it against criticism)Recent research indicated it could go as high as 40% in Canada1 Globally, an estimated one in five employees (21 per cent) is an ‘employee activist,’ meaning they draw visibility to their organization and defend their employer from negative criticism. An additional 33 per cent of employees have high potential to become employee activists.In Canada, the number of employee activists is in line with the 21 per cent global figure — but 43 per cent of employees are considered high-potentials when it comes to employee activism.“Canadian employers should embrace the engagement opportunity employee activism presents,” said Greg Power, president of Weber Shandwick Canada.“Identifying and activating employees willing to rise to levels of extraordinary support for their organizations should be on the C-Suite agenda at every Canadian company.”Social media is critical to employee engagement and helps fuel employee activism, found the study.Employees in Canada reported that:• 40 per cent of them post messages, pictures or videos about their employer on social media• 27 per cent have shared praise or positive comments about their employer online• 26 per cent share messages, pictures or video about their employer online without any encouragement from the employer• eight per cent have shared criticism or negative comments• three per cent have posted something about their employer on social media that they regret
  • CEO have taken notice around the worldCorporate leaders are going back to basics in 2014, positioning themselves for growth after a long post-crisis period of restructuring, according to a survey from the US-based Conference Board.
  • Here at home Engagement is being regulated (ECFAC Bill 146) & there is more legislation on the horizon
  • We better define it: One thing I want to point out is the difference between job satisfaction and engagement. They are not the same. Let me repeat that “they are not the same” in fact they are not even close.Satisfied employee are content, gratified even satiated but engage employee are focused, have a sense of urgency and intensity, are measurably more enthusitic, persistent and adaptable, this is where we want our employee to beSatisfied employee focus on what they get while engaged employees focus what they can give.Furthermore how we measure engagement is different.For the next Portion of my presentation I going talk about how to measure engagement concisely and more important how to ensure action is taken from your engagement survey & and give you some tips tactics to take away.
  • Links - Chapter 4Cost of keeping us employed – every year at risk - 2011 study completed by team of social sciences completed at University of Canberra in Australia having a job that we hate is as bad for our health sometime worse than not having a job at all – depression of those at work same or greater than those who are unemployed. People at work that care for us then our stress levels decrease.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2237371/Hating-job-bad-health-unemployed-researchers-warn.htmlAnother study at University College of London 2011 people who not recognized at work have more heart disease – lack of control. Darrel O’Connor –professor of health phycology at University of Leeds Employees who put in a lot of effort in and are not recognized. Increases stressSaved in marketing/collateral dev/articles/stressGallup Poll 2013 state of the American work place when boss ignored us we disengage 40% , if boss citizen us 22% disengage, recognize one of our strengths 1% disengage.http://www.gallup.com/strategicconsulting/163007/state-american-workplace.aspxWhitehall study – higher we climb ladder more stress we feel, executive stress syndrome , Place in corporate ladder and stress , degree of control employees have throughout the day. Less control more stress.http://www.ucl.ac.uk/whitehallII/history2012 study at Harvard and Stanford stress level at Harvard MBA program, hormone levels at different levels, leaders had lower levels, the more Sr. you might expect to live longer than lower level employees, not a small discrepancy. Sense of control of our work, those empowered have less stress.http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/item.aspx?num=42987Human Resources consultant Mercer LLC 4th quarter 2010 and first quarter 2011 1 in 3 employees considered leaving their job up 23% from 5 years prior. Less than 1.5 employees voluntarily left. People feel stuck. http://www.mercer.com/press-releases/1418665A study by 2 researchers at graduate school of social work Boston College child’s sense of well being effected by parents that enjoy their workhttp://www.bc.edu/content/dam/files/centers/cwf/research/publications/pdf/Culture_%26_WorkLife_Balance_Scan.pdfhttp://workplaceflexibility.bc.edu/need/need_employees
  • Engagement refers to one’s emotional commitment to their organization and the organization’s goals. It leads to discretionary effort.  A sales person who feels engaged will work just as hard on Friday afternoon as she does on Monday morning. A customer service professional who feels engaged will go the extra mile to resolve problems and complaints. An assembly line worker who feels engaged will work a little faster and is less likely to have an accident.Engagement is a feeling. It’s a feeling that makes you:More likely to refer a friend for employment at your companyLess likely to think about looking for a job with another companyMore likely to work extra hours without being askedMore likely to feel pride in your companyMore likely to be satisfied with your jobSo while it’s true we cannot put a numerical value on the feeling of engagement, we can certainly create proxy questions—validated over time—around the behaviors associated with engagement.Imperfect? Yes. That’s why we call them proxy questions. But still an invaluable tool to understand trends and correlations.
  • The left are all important – salient etc. (spend more time)We can pull out your top three – key driversThis is the output of a typical Key Driver Analysis It’s all about how the survey questions relate to engagement score (it is not if they are high or low but in the strengths of their relationship to engagement that is important)A Key Driver Analysis is a Powerful tool becauseFirst it tells you what the drivers are (what is important to your employees in terms of engagement)Second, a Key driver analysis can answer "What If?“ (“what if we increase the teamwork score by 10%)Third, key drivers can be different for different groupsIt needs to be built into survey design in that you have to design
  • In addition to showing causation, this study looked at the size of the effect(i.e., the strength of engagement) on customer satisfaction. Using a binomial effect size display for the link between engagement and subsequent customer satisfaction the findings were r = .43.To put this effect size into perspective for everyday practitioners, it can be compared to the effect sizes of many drugs as reported in the journal, American Psychologist:Chemotherapy and breast cancer survival: r = .03Antibiotics and the cure for pediatric ear pain: r = .08Smoking and incidence of lung cancer within 25 years: r = .08Effect of ibuprofen on pain reduction: r = .14Alcohol and aggressive behavior: r = .23Sleeping pills and improvement in insomnia: r = .30Viagra and improved male sexual functioning: r = .38
  • A multi-year intervention in an American chemical manufacturing plant led to a 91% improvement in employee engagement which was correlated with a 167% increase in production quality and an 83% decrease in reportable safety incidents.  The project focused moving away from a “safety program” and replacing that with a “culture of safety” based on a clear understanding of the organizational climate and new management practices focused on Relationship-Centered Leadership.  The case is summarized in a key concept:  Leaders Don’t Motivate – They Create the Conditions for Self-Motivation.
  • A)   Introductory questionsApproaching the employee – approach the targeted employee during a lull period and use an introductory statement something along this line. “I want you to know that both I and the firm appreciate your commitment to the firm and the great work that you have been doing. If you have a few minutes, I would like to have an informal conversation with you to ensure that we fully understand the factors that make you loyal and that keep you here, and any possible actions that we can take to bolster your job experience and to keep you happy.”Starting the interview – start the interview with a simple introductory statement like the following. “Thanks for taking the time to have this discussion. As one of our key employees, I want to informally pose some simple questions that can help me to understand the factors that cause you to enjoy and stay in your current role. During the interview I will also use a series of questions in order to identify any factor that could possibly frustrate you to the point where you might even begin to consider other job opportunities.”B) Identify the factors that make the employee want to stayPositive stay factors – tell me specifically, what factors cause you to enjoy your current job and work situation (including people, job, rewards, job content, coworkers, management etc.), and as a result, they contribute to your staying at our firm as long as you have? Help us identify the factors that make you more passionate, committed, and loyal to your team and the firm.Reasons you give to others – if you have ever been asked by a close friend or have been contacted by an external recruiter, can you tell me what reasons you gave them for wanting to stay at our firm?“Best work of your life” factors – do you feel that you are currently doing “the best work of your life?” Can you list for me the factors that could contribute to you” doing the best for your life?” (Note: this is the No. 1 key retention factor for top performers)“Job impact” factors – do you feel that your work makes a difference in the company and that externally it has a noticeable impact on customers and the world? Do you also feel that your coworkers think that you make a difference? (Note: this is the No.2 key retention factor for top performers.)Fully used factors – do you feel “fully utilized” in your current role? If so, can you identify the factors that make you feel fully utilized? Are there additional things that we can do to more fully take advantage of your talents and interests?Are you listened to and valued – do your colleagues and teammates listen to you and do they value your ideas, inputs, and decisions? How can that area be improved?
  • C) Identify the positive actions related to retention that might further increase this employee’s loyalty and commitment to your firmBetter managed – if you “managed yourself,” what would you do differently (in relation to managing “you”), that I, as your current manager, don’t currently do?More positive elements and fewer less desirable ones – can you make a list of the elements or motivation factors in your current role that you like best and that you would like “more of? What factors would you miss most if you transferred you to a completely different job? What things do you really miss from your last job at the firm? Can you also make a list of the less-desirable elements or frustrators in your current role that you would like to do “less of?” Are there any frustration factors that keep you up at night, that enter your mind while driving to work, or that cause you to dread having to come to work at all?Dream job – if you were given the opportunity to redesign your current role, can you make a list of the key factors that you would include in your “dream job?”Where would you like to be – can you help us understand your career progression expectations and let us know where you would like to be in the organization two years from now?Challenge factors – can you list for us the most challenging but exciting aspects of your current job situation? Are there actions that we can take to further challenge you?Recognition – can you highlight any recent recognition and acknowledgment that you have received that increased your commitment and loyalty? Are there actions that we can take to further recognize you?Exposure – can you highlight the recent exposure to executives and decision makers that you have experienced? And are there ways that we could increase or improve that exposure? Learning, growth, and leadership – can you highlight for me your positive experiences in the area of learning, development, and growth? And are there ways where we could increase that growth? The employee should also be asked if they desire to move into a leadership role, and if so, what are their expectations, their timetable, and their concerns?D) Identify the possible “triggers” that may cause the employee to consider leavingTriggers are occurrences or events that driver loyal employees to at least begin considering looking for new job.Identify possible retention triggers – if you were to ever begin to consider leaving … help me understand what kind of “triggers” or negative factors that might cause you to consider leaving? Please include both job and company trigger factors.Recent frustrators – think back to a time in the last 12 months when you have been at least slightly frustrated or anxious about your current role. Can you list for me the frustration factor or factors that most contributed to that anxiety? Can you also help me understand what eventually happened to lower that frustration level?Others made you think – if you’ve had conversations with other employees who have considered leaving or who have actually left our firm, did any of the reasons that they provided for leaving cause you to at least partially nod in agreement? If so, can you list those factors and tell me why they seemed to be at least partially justifiable as a reason for leaving to you?Past triggers – what are the prime factors that caused you to leave your last two jobs? Are there factors from your previous jobs that you hope you will never have to experience again at our firm?
  • D) Identify the possible “triggers” that may cause the employee to consider leavingTriggers are occurrences or events that driver loyal employees to at least begin considering looking for new job.Identify possible retention triggers – if you were to ever begin to consider leaving … help me understand what kind of “triggers” or negative factors that might cause you to consider leaving? Please include both job and company trigger factors.Recent frustrators – think back to a time in the last 12 months when you have been at least slightly frustrated or anxious about your current role. Can you list for me the frustration factor or factors that most contributed to that anxiety? Can you also help me understand what eventually happened to lower that frustration level?Others made you think – if you’ve had conversations with other employees who have considered leaving or who have actually left our firm, did any of the reasons that they provided for leaving cause you to at least partially nod in agreement? If so, can you list those factors and tell me why they seemed to be at least partially justifiable as a reason for leaving to you?Past triggers – what are the prime factors that caused you to leave your last two jobs? Are there factors from your previous jobs that you hope you will never have to experience again at our firm?
  • They stimulate the employee – most employees are excited simply by the fact that the organization is concerned about their future and that their manager took the time to consult with them.Personalized – unlike engagement surveys and many other retention tools that are focused on what excites a large number of employees, this approach is customized to a single identifiable individual and their wants.They are limited to key employees – by having a “stay” discussion exclusively with your key employees who are at risk of leaving, you focus the manager’s effort and you minimize the overall time that the manager must devote to retention.They include actions – unlike exit interviews, which only identify problems, stay interviews also encourage the parties to identify actions that can improve the employee experience and actions that can help eliminate any major frustrators or turnover triggers.Lower employee emotions – the discussion occurs before the employee has made the decision to consider leaving. As a result, the emotions of the employee (and perhaps the manager) are lower.Low time pressure on the manager – because the employee is not actively interviewing for a job, there is less time pressure on the manager to immediately solve the identified retention issues.A focus on the positive – most of the interview is focused on identifying and then reinforcing the positive factors that the employee enjoys about their job. Although some negative factors may be covered, they are not the primary focus of the interview.They don’t require training – most managers can successfully conduct stay interviews without any formal training. A simple “how-to toolkit” is generally all that a manager needs to successfully conduct these interviews.They are inexpensive – these informal interviews don’t require a budget. In most cases, an hour of a manager and an employee’s time are the only major cost factors.

Transcript

  • 1. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. American Society for Quality (ASQ) – Ottawa Chapter April 23, 2014
  • 2. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Main Header Text 2
  • 3. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Today’s Agenda 3
  • 4. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Today’s Agenda 4 23% to 67% expect meaningful work
  • 5. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Today’s Agenda 5
  • 6. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Why? 6
  • 7. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. 7
  • 8. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Today’s Agenda 8 1 in 5
  • 9. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Human Capital – Top CEO Challenge Globally for 2014 9 http://www.ft.com
  • 10. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Human Capital #2 – Top CEO Challenge USA for 2014 10
  • 11. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Satisfaction is Not the Same as Engagement 11 ENGAGED EMPLOYEES feel a sense of: Focus Urgency Intensity Enthusiasm Persistence Adaptability The focus is on desiring to “give”
  • 12. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. TalentMap’s Focus 12 Heart Hands Logical Emotional Behavioural Head Employee engagement is a heightened emotional and intellectual connection that an employee has for his/her job, organization, manager, or coworkers that, in turn, influences him/her to apply additional discretionary effort to his/her work. Career & Financial Goals Achieved Values Align with Peers, Management and Leaders Discretionary Effort
  • 13. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Engagement Matters 13 Revenue Customer Satisfaction Safety Productivity Attendance Retention Public Confidence
  • 14. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Engagement Matters – The Magic 14 University of Canberra: a job that we hate is as bad for our health sometime worse than not having a job at all University College of London 2011 not recognized at work have more heart disease Whitehall study: Sr. Exec live longer than lower level employees, not a small discrepancy Boston College child’s sense of well being effected by parents that enjoy their work
  • 15. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Why No/Limited Executive Buy In? 15 1. Don’t think it can be measured. 3. Don’t get presented with a clear business case for engagement 2. Don’t believe its all that important.
  • 16. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. It Absolutely Can Be Measured Through Proxy 16 +/- Client A 2012* +/- TM Benchmark 3 1 4 4 1 2 5 13 6 9 17 15 13 18 84 93 88 79 84 84 77 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Overall Engagement I am proud to tell others I work for my organization. I am optimistic about the future of my organization. My organization inspires me to do my best work. I would recommend my my organization to a friend as a great place to work. My job provides me with a sense of personal accomplishment. I can see a clear link between my work and my organization's long-term objectives. % Frequency Unfavourable Neutral Favourable* Number indicates % Favourable score +1 +4 +2 +4 +8 +8 -2 +2 +5 +10 -3 -1 -2 +1 Data is rounded to the nearest whole number
  • 17. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Survey Design 17 #2 Innovation #1 Teamwork #3 Professional Growth Employee Engagement Employee Engagement Innovation Customer Focus Work/life Balance Information & Communications Teamwork Compensation Work Environment Performance Feedback Professional Growth Immediate Management Organizational Vision Senior Leadership Dependent Variable Independent Variables
  • 18. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. And Improved Over Time 18 56% 58% 60% 62% 64% 66% 68% 70% 72% 74% 76% 78% 80% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 %Favourable Engagement Score of 500 person Technology Company
  • 19. Driver #1 – Innovation/Quality Improvement 18 15 7 23 16 29 24 29 11 23 22 33 59 56 83 54 62 38 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Overall Innovation Failure is viewed as an opportunity for learning and improvement. We are committed to doing high quality work. We systematically adopt new and improved ways to work. Learning is an important objective in our day-to-day work. There is a culture of innovation at this organization. % Frequency Unfavourable Neutral Favourable 19 (67) -5 -2 -6 -11 -20 Data is rounded to the nearest whole number +/- TM Benchmark
  • 20. 20Driver #1 - Innovation: Comments 191 respondents selected a theme for this comment How could your organization improve innovation? 41% 40% 39% 32% 28% 19% 6% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Better communication Clearer direction More training and development More freedom More commitment Satisfied with innovation Other %Frequency XYX Inc. Benchmark
  • 21. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Why No/Limited Executive Buy In? 21 1. Don’t think it can be measured. 3. Don’t get presented with a clear business case for engagement 2. Don’t believe its all that important.
  • 22. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Talk To Him/Her In Their Terms 22 1. Use Data – statistics 2. Link to the business objectives 3. Competitors? 4. Link to personal goals & objectives 5. Leave a legacy
  • 23. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Use Statistics 23  Chemotherapy and breast cancer survival: r = .03  Antibiotics and the cure for pediatric ear pain: r = .08  Smoking and incidence of lung cancer within 25 years: r = .08  Effect of ibuprofen on pain reduction: r = .14  Alcohol and aggressive behavior: r = .23  Sleeping pills and improvement in insomnia: r = .30  Viagra and improved male sexual functioning: r = .38  Employee engagement and customer satisfaction: r = .43
  • 24. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. And More Statistics 24 SERVICE  Employees‟ customer service productivity scores and their employee engagement scores had a correlation of .51. (Source: Linking People Measures to Strategy. The Conference Board)  Companies with high employee engagement scores had twice the customer loyalty (repeat purchases, recommendations to friends) than companies with average employee engagement levels. (Source: Are They Really „On the Job‟?, Pont)  In a major department store chain, customers scored higher in customer engagement measures when they were serviced in departments with employees who had high levels of employee engagement. (Source: Getting Engaged, Bates)  Teams classified as “high performance zone for engagement” had a 37% net promoter score (NPS) versus 10% NPS for teams “outside of high performance zone for engagement.” (Source: Aon Hewitt European Manager Survey 2011. Aon Hewitt)  Morrison Management Specialists increased client satisfaction by 1 percentage point for every 2 percentage point increase in employee engagement (Source: Engagement Leads to Growth at Morrison, Talent Management) SALES  Fabick CAT improved “percent of industry net sales” by 300% (Source: A Caterpillar Dealer Unearths Employee Engagement, Gallup Business Journal)
  • 25. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. 25 QUALITY  Unnamed Fortune 100 manufacturing company reduced quality errors from 5,658 parts per million to 52 parts per million. (Source: Employee Engagement: The Key To Realizing Competitive Advantage, Development Dimensions International) SAFETY MolsonCoors, it was found that engaged employees were five times less likely than non-engaged employees to have a safety incident and seven times less likely to have a lost-time safety incident. (Source: Effective practice guidelines: Employee engagement and commitment. SHRM) RETENTION … REVENUE, PROFIT AND STOCK RETURNS… ROLE OF FRONT-LINE MANAGERS… And More Statistics
  • 26. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Link Engagement to the Business 26 Internal Service Quality Employee Engagement Employee Retention Employee Productivity External Service Value Customer Satisfaction Customer Loyalty Revenue Growth Profitability Service concept: results for customers Service designed and delivered to meet targeted customers‟ needs Retention Repeat business Referral Employee Engagement Innovation Customer Focus Information & Communicati on Teamwork Work/life Balance Performance Feedback Professional Growth Work Environment Compensation Senior Leadership Organizational Vision Immediate Management
  • 27. A multi-year intervention in an American chemical manufacturing plant • 91% improvement in employee engagement • 167% increase in production quality and an • 83% decrease in reportable safety incidents. “Leaders Don’t Motivate – They Create the Conditions for Self-Motivation.” Show What Competitors Do
  • 28. Get Engagement on his/her Goals/Objectives
  • 29. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. 29 Help Them Leave a Legacy
  • 30. What are Stay Interviews •Definition: • A “stay interview” is a periodic one- on-one structured discussion between a manager and an employee that identifies and then reinforces the factors that drives an employees retention and engagement. www.talentmap.com 30
  • 31. Structure of Stay Interviews A) Introductory questions • Starting the conversation B) Identify the factors that make the employee want to stay and engage • Positive stay factors • Reasons you give to others • “Best work of your life” factors • “Job impact” factors • Fully used factors • Are you listened to and valued www.talentmap.com 31
  • 32. Structure of Stay Interviews (cont.) C) Identify the positive actions related to retention that might further increase engagement. • Better managed/manage differently? • More positive elements and fewer less desirable ones • Dream job? • Where would you like to be X years? • Challenge factors • How do you like to be Recognition? • Exposure to executive? • Learning, growth, and leadership www.talentmap.com 32
  • 33. Structure of Stay Interviews (cont.) D) Identify the possible “triggers” that may cause the employee to consider leaving • Identify possible retention triggers • Recent frustrations • Others made you think • Past triggers www.talentmap.com 33
  • 34. Many Benefits of Why-do-You-Stay? Interviews • They stimulate the employee • Personalized • They typically limited to key employees • They include actions • Lower employee emotions • Low time pressure on the manager • A focus on the positive • They don‟t require a lot of training • They are inexpensive 34
  • 35. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. TalentMap In-Action 35  Free Monthly Webinars  Next one April 24th 12:00 EST  TalentMap on “Engaging Your Employees with Your Organizational Vision”  To Register: www.talentmap.com/events  Fall Events:  Sept 10-12 Ontario Municipal HR Association (OMHRA) Alliston, ON  Nov 3-5 HealthAchieve Conference Toronto  Nov 17-18 Canada Top 100 Employees Conference Vancouver  To Register: www.talentmap.com/events  Free Resources www.talentmap.com/resources  Subscribe to our newsletter  Coming months  Whitepapers (Context Specific Engagement)  Financial, Engineering &Technology, Healthcare, Regulatory/Government, NGO  Video‟s 1-2 min videos on topics  Employee Engagement checklist, FAQs & Best Practices @talentmap
  • 36. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. 36 sfitzpatrick@talentmap.com 613-248-3417 x 500 ??? Questions!
  • 37. Copyright©2014, Talent Map. All rights reserved. Today’s Agenda 37