Save-a-Life tour comes to NCBCBy Construction Electrician Constructionman Lucinda L. MoiseNCBC Public Affairs  Personnel a...
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Save a Life story April 2, 2013

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Save a Life story April 2, 2013

  1. 1. Save-a-Life tour comes to NCBCBy Construction Electrician Constructionman Lucinda L. MoiseNCBC Public Affairs Personnel attached to Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Gulfport attended a Save-a-Life Tour presentation at the NCBC Training Hall, March 22. The national high impact alcoholawareness program uses a shocking approach to teach about the dangers of drinking and driving. The Save a Life Tour features a drunk driving simulator, real life videos of drunk drivingaccident scenes, along with emergency room documentaries of injured victims and drunk driversreceiving treatment for their injuries. For five years the Save-a-Life Tour has traveled to militaryinstallations, high schools and colleges, visiting 80 percent of military bases in the U. S. toeducate people on the dangers if driving while intoxicated.. According to the tour manager, Andrew Tipton, the Tour uses hands on and visual methods toshow just how dangerous drinking under the influence of alcohol is. “We use a different perspective. Through the shocking, but realistic video presentations and thedrinking and driving simulator, we show people what drinking and driving often leads to, whichis the totally preventable injury or death of themselves or others,” said Tipton. The drinking and driving simulator is equipped with real life features such as a steering wheel,brake and gas pedals. It also contains over 100 miles of various road ways and a built incomputer that tracks the amount of traffic signs each driver breaks. During the program,audience members were given the opportunity to operate the simulator to experience first-handthe effects alcohol has on driving. However, instead of the person being intoxicated the simulatoressentially imitates a drunken person behind the wheel of a car. Culinary Specialist 1st Class Jason Robinson, assigned to NCBC’s Colmer Dining Facility, wasamong those who got behind the wheel of the simulator, and believes it broadened hisunderstanding of the way alcohol impairs driving skills. “Driving the simulator was an eye opening experience. Actually being behind the wheel andfeeling the effects myself gave me a fuller understanding of how much alcohol slows ourreaction time,” said Robinson. According to Tipton, every 32 minutes someone is injured or killed by a drunk driver. He urgeseveryone to think twice before driving intoxicated and take the keys from anyone who beendrinking. Save a life!

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