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    11 jan07courier 11 jan07courier Document Transcript

    • 1/10/2007 14:09 Page 1 PG 1 COLOR Home of the Atlantic Fleet Seabees Gulfport, Mississippi Vol. 44 No. 1 PG 24 COLOR January 11, 2007 inside this edition BU2 Michael Schreiber cuts boards for wall supports in the Southwest Asia (SWA) huts the Seabees of NMCB 18 are building for Marines to improve their living conditions in Iraq. See page 6 CE2 Johnathan Zub of NMCB 74 places the wall of a shower trailer at Camp Corregidor. NMCB 74 is currently deployed throughout Southwest Asia in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. See page 12 http://cbcgulfport.navy.mil Photo by Jean Remley Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport held a 21-gun salute on January 3, 2007 to honor the memory of Gerald R. Ford, the 38th President of the United States. GMC James King, 20th Seabee Readiness Group (left) controls the volleys fired by cannon crew members GM1 James Bell, 20th Seabee Readiness Group and GM1 Joseph Russ, 22nd Naval Construction Regiment (right). 24 CB PG 01-24 COLOR January 11, 2007 Seabees put smiles on the faces of students at Lopez Elementary in Biloxi when they partnered with other volunteers in December to build a KaBOOM playground for the children to replace the one destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. See page 3 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 2 PG 2 B&W CLEAN PG 23 B&W “We EXIST to enable Warfighter Readiness” NCBC/20SRG Commanding Officer Capt. Van Dobson Executive Officer Cmdr. Bill Finn Public Affairs Officer Jean Remley Editor Bonnie L. McGerr Mass Comm. Specialist MC1 Sean Mulligan 22ND NCR Commander Capt. Eric Odderstol Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Kyra Hawn NMCB ONE Commanding Officer Cmdr. Dean A. Tufts Public Affairs Officer Lt. Kris Portacci Mass. Comm. Specialists MC2 Chad Runge MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB SEVEN Commanding Officer Cmdr. David J. Sasek Public Affairs Officer Ensign Russell Becker Mass Comm. Specialists MCC Jeffrey J. Pierce MC3 Paul D. Williams NMCB SEVENTY FOUR Commanding Officer Cmdr. Craig S. Prather Public Affairs Officer Lt. Edsil L. Logan Mass Comm. Specialist MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB ONE THIRTY THREE January 11, 2007 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Allan Stratman Public Affairs Officer Lt.j.g. Amy Yoon Mass Comm. Specialist MC3 Jessica A. McIver 2 NCTC Gulfport Commanding Officer Cmdr. Darius Banaji Public Affairs Officer BU1(SCW) James LePage The Seabee Courier is an authorized publication for members of the military services and their families. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the DoD or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in this newspaper, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U. S. Government, DoD, the Navy, NCBC Gulfport or Gulf Publishing Company of the products and services advertised. All content in this newspaper shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The Seabee Courier is published 22 weeks a year by Gulf Publishing Company, a private firm in no way connected with the DoD , under an exclusive contract with the U. S. Navy. The Seabee Courier solicits news contributions from military and civilian sources, but the Public Affairs staff reserves the right to edit and/or rewrite material selected for publication to conform with journalism standards. The deadline for material is close of business Wednesday the week prior to publication. Your comments are always welcome. The Seabee Courier office is in Building 60, Room 250. The mailing address is 4902 Marvin Shields Blvd., Code 15, Gulfport, MS 39501. Phone: 228 871-3662, Fax: 228 871-2389. Email: seabeecourier@navy.mil. Appearance leaves a lasting impression FLTCM(SW/AW) Jackie DiRosa Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Did you ever sit beside someone who smelled badly? It didn't have to be a strong odor, just enough that it made you notice. Think about how you reacted to that person. Did you feel that person was ready for the day? Did you feel he or she needed some help? How much respect did you have for that person? More than likely, you thought less of that person because cleanliness was a simple matter for you. Now think about your uniform appearance. Does it really matter? The truth is it does. Whether you're working with seniors or subordinates, people notice a squared-away Sailor. And whether they say something or not, it affects the way they will treat you. All of those catchy phrases, "Perception is reality", and "First impressions are lasting impressions", those phrases persist simply because they contain universal truths. People will make assumptions about your character, performance and values based on your appearance. Those first perceptions will last regardless of who you are and what you do. A sloppy uniform reflects a person who may be sloppy in job performance, watchstanding and many other areas. When I see someone in a sloppy uniform or someone with a blatant disregard for the regulations it raises many questions in my mind....if sloppy in uniform are they sloppy in their job, watch standing, etc. If they fail to pay attention to the simple details of the uniform regs do they fail to pay attention to other critical details of their job making them a vulnerable target? Uniform regulations spell out exactly what is necessary to maintain a sharp appearance and meet standards. There is no guesswork involved. This applies to wearing the prescribed uniform as well as the optional items, such as backpacks. Bright orange, purple, green – these are all the colors of backpacks you should NOT be carrying while in uniform. Navy blue OR black are the only two colors authorized according to the Uniform Regulations. Failing to take care of those small details that make up a sharp appear- ance brings a person's entire character into question. A sharp uniform creates a positive impression. Those who wear a sharp uniform carry themselves differently...with pride and confidence. We are all responsible for enforcing the standards and holding each other accountable for their appearance. Often, Sailors can turn themselves around just by having a good mentor who sets them straight. If you are a mentor, make sure your Sailors understand the importance of taking pride in their uniform. Set the bar high. Their success or failure in this basic area will affect their entire outlook on the Navy. If you're in need of a mentor or role model, look around and find one that can challenge you to be your best. Squared-away Sailors decide daily that their career, self-respect and the respect of others depend upon how well they present themselves. Nobody wants to sit next to the smelly guy, or worse, be that person. Only you can choose your fate and either be viewed as a vulnerable target or a fortress. What will be the lasting impression you leave on people you meet? 3rd Annual Seabee Classic Golf Tournament Friday, January 19 - - - 8 a.m. & 2 p.m. Starts Windance Golf & Country Club/Benefits the 2007 Seabee Ball Fees (per person): 03 & above: $55, E7 thru 03: $50, E6& below: $40, DoD & civilian: $60. Retired military pay at retired rank. Two FREE E3 and below teams (4 players) per command. Entry fee includes: green fees, cart, practice balls, awards, prizes and lunch. Register early, spots are limited. Must pay by January 12! Contact Lt.j.g. Michael Dobling for more information at 228 871-2636 or email: Michael.dobling@navy.mil By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Servicemembers will receive an average 3.5 percent boost in their basic allowance for housing compensation benefit in 2007, Defense Department officials said Dec. 18. The planned BAH increase starting Jan. 1 works out to about $300 million more than what was paid in 2006, officials said. "The continued improvement in housing allowances represents our commitment to the preservation of a compensation and benefit structure which will provide members with a suitable and secure standard of living that will sustain a trained, experienced and ready force in the future," according to Cynthia Smith, a DoD spokeswoman. Officials said military housing allowances are computed according to three key criteria: median current market rent; average utilities, to include electricity, heat and water/sewer costs; and average renter's insurance. BAH rates also are based on dwelling type and number of bedrooms in a given area and then calculated for each pay grade, both with and without family members. For servicemembers with family members, average increases in the BAH are approximately $44 per month. For example, a typical 3rd Class Petty Officer/Corporal (E-4) will receive about $34 more in BAH than in 2006, while a See BAH page 17 Command Action Line Because of limited IG resources throughout the Southeast Region, all Fraud, Waste and Abuse hotline work will now be handled by the Region. To report Fraud, Waste and Abuse, contact the Region at: Toll Free 1-877-657-9851 Comm: (904) 542-4979 DSN 942-4979 FAX: (904) 542-5587 E-mail: CNRSE_HOTLINE@navy.mil New year means new prices for DoD galleys From BAH page 2 Senior Chief Petty Officer/Master Sergeant (E-8) will receive about $42 more than this year. The BAH rate system has built-in protections to ensure that an individual servicemember in a given location won't see his or her BAH rate decrease. This provision assures that members who have made long-term lease or contract commitments are not penalized if the area's housing costs decrease. Some areas' housing costs have remained relatively stable, while others continue to rise. Most of the costliest housing in the United States with the highest BAH rates are clustered on or near the East and West coasts, and the state of Hawaii. The Department of Defense has announced the following food service rates, effective 1 January 2007. The discount rate shall be charged to spouses and dependents of Enlisted Personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-4, members of an organized non-profit youth group. Officers, Enlisted and Federal Civilian personnel not receiving the meal portion of per diem or using temporary dining facilities are also entitled to the discount rate. The standard rate shall be charged to all members receiving the Basic allowance for subsistence. From BLOCK page 10 Discount Breakfast $1.65 From ADOPT page 19 with a variety of lights and ornaments. Every member on the Whidbey Island Detail gave something. Some gave money, others gave school supplies, and the rest gave either clothes or toys. The gleam in the children's eyes made an everlasting impression on these Seabee Santas in $4.20 Supper $4.30 $5.15 Holiday $5.15 $6.05 Night Snack $2.00 "I've got a small make-up set but this one is awesome," said Tabitha For a family that had so little, they had a lot of heart. A few pictures were taken and some stories were swapped. The family asked a lot of questions about the Seabees and specifically how their own families were dealing with them being away from home during the holidays. After a couple of hours, $3.65 Brunch $3.60 opened a card with $30 in it. A gift of fleece pajamas bearing images of the Care Bears, was also one of her favorites. Jimmy, the man of the house at the tender age of 11, was thrilled to get a chained wallet, a Tony Hawk game for his Game Boy and an assortment of school supplies. Tabitha, the oldest of the three, received some music CD's, several articles of clothing and make-up. $3.65 Dinner $3.15 hard hats. For a family that had thought that Christmas day was almost over, it was just beginning. SK2 Wright had made sure that Mom was taken care of as well. Although Stephanie had said that it was "more about the kids," she too was overwhelmed. The Fearless Seabees watched with joyful hearts as the kids opened the gifts. Lexi, the youngest girl, said "I am rich!" as she $2.00 Lunch $3.15 weapons," said BU1 Barry Moyar. "Everyone getting the opportunity to fire the weapons better prepares us for our future deployments." The Seabees found that unlike a regular FEX, when the daily activities stop for the exercise, carrying on as scheduled, while also having a FEX provided a challenge. The experience and knowledge gained from the newly laid blocks, increases the ability to succeed no matter what comes next for the battalion. Standard $2.35 goodbyes were said and a "Merry Christmas" was wished by all. It is uncertain who received the greatest blessing this day. For those who gave and for those who received, came the realization that as long as you have hope and an open heart, small miracles can happen. 23 CB PG 02-23 Uniform standards Military housing rates rise 3.5 percent overall January 11, 2007 14:09 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • 1/10/2007 14:09 Page 3 3 COLOR CLEAN 22 COLORClassified January 11, 2007 22 CB PG 03-22 COLOR 3 Seabee Courier January 11, 2007 'Bees + Kaboom = Happy Kids! December 06 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 4 PG 4 B&W No Higher than 4” across 5 columns Wounded Seabee recovers in Gulfport 4 SWC (SCW) William Bell of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four (NMCB 74) returned from Iraq on Dec. 22 and was met with cheers and gratitude from over one hundred local service members, Seabee family members and veterans who crowded the Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport. Bell, who was seriously injured in early December in a mortar attack to the forward operating base where he worked, was grateful to be home and even more grateful to be alive. "I wouldn't wish this upon my worst enemy, but I know that I have been kept alive for a purpose and I intend to honor that gift to the best of my ability," stated Bell in a phone interview prior to his return. The same mortar attack took the lives of two Navy corpsmen. "I remember shouting for medical assistance when I saw my Shipmates down, but at that point I didn't know how bad it was. I was in shock myself and couldn't have told you whether or not my injuries were life-threatening. You work hard over there, you do your job, and you just focus on the mission," Bell related of his experience. Having sustained a serious injury to his leg and thigh and lacerations up one side of his body, Bell was relieved to learn that the quick work of corpsman on scene stabilized his condi- AD SPACE tion and saved his leg from amputation. "I can't say thank you enough to the people who dragged me out of there and patched me up," he expressed. After his medical evacuation to Germany and subsequent transfer to the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Bell was reunited with his wife Brooke and daughter Tamara. "The hardest part was hearing what he had gone through, but not being able to see him or look into his eyes to know how he was really doing," reflected wife Brooke. "Our daughter was extremely anxious until she was able to see him again." Bell remained in the beltway following his discharge from Bethesda in order to attend interment services at Arlington National Cemetery for one of the corpsman killed in the mortar attack. As Brooke wheeled her husband down the jetway in Miss., a young Air Force Airman called members of the military in the terminal to attention. Friends, family, civilians and military present gave Bell a standing ovation and waved American flags. "I didn't get this kind of reception when I returned from Vietnam," remarked an older gentleman waiting for his plane, "but I sure am glad that we're doing right by our service members today." When asked what message Bell had for members of his unit still deployed to Iraq, Bell related, "I just want them to stay safe, and I want them to know that I'm okay. I don't need anybody worrying about me. They are the ones we need be thinking about, and praying for their safe return." Bell will undergo multiple additional surgeries and expects to convalesce for an additional six months or more. "My goal is to be on my feet to greet the plane when my unit returns," Bell related optimistically. NMCB 74 will remain deployed in support of Marine Expeditionary Forces in Iraq through Spring of 2007. While deployed, the unit provides convoy security details and military construction support to a variety of camps and forward operating bases. The unit has recently been involved in missions supporting infrastructure of Iraqi police forces in efforts to empower the Iraqi government. NMCB 74 Orote Point construction project Photo by RP1 Chad Robinson BU2 Michael Bonner and BU3 Deontee Parker of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion Seventy Four DET Guam place and vibrate concrete for a column at the Orote Point mechanics shop . The NMCB 74 detachment is tasked with constructing a shop that will give Seabees a safe, new facility to use when they work on quarry equipment. The concrete placement represents a major step in the construction of the new building. January 11, 2007 January 11, 2007 By Lt.Cmdr. Kyra Hawn 22nd NCR Public Affairs 21 B&WChurch Page AD SPACE 21 CB PG 04-21 14:10 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • 1/10/2007 14:11 Page 6 PG 6 B&W CLEAN PG 19 B&W 2 Col. Cln NMCB 1 completes diverse Far East deployment 74's Det Whidbey Island adopts family for holidays By MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB 1 Public Affairs By SW1 (SCW) Donald Farwell NMCB 74 Det Whidbey Island ferent time zones, and the agility to deploy and redeploy task-tailored teams to diverse missions will serve the unit well in OIF. "While deployed it was imperative that we foster relationships with other service branch commanders and learn to assess their needs and assert our capabilities," said Brooks. "When we deploy with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force, we need to already be familiar and efficient in our ability to move, complete short duration projects, and move again; because that is what will be expected of us in a contingency environment." Cmdr. Dean Tufts, who assumed command of NMCB 1 in July 2006 related the serious nature of deploying to primarily non-combat detachment locations. "Right now, there are Seabees from Gulfport operating on the tip of the spear in Iraq. There is little room for error. What we do on deployment to Japan, Korea, and the states has to be good, and we have to sharpen our skills now, because we know we'll have to hit the ground running next year." Photo by MC2 Demetrius Kennon Friends and family of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion ONE's (NMCB 1) Seabees anxiously await the battalion's arrival at Trent Lott Air National Guard Base Dec. 15, 2006. NMCB 1 recently completed a regularly scheduled deployment to the Far East. On Christmas Day, the Seabees loaded their truck with gifts for the family and embarked on a surprise holiday delivery. Not knowing what kind of reception they would get, they soon arrived at Stephanie's house. They couldn't help wondering what went through Stephanie's mind when she saw a group of people dressed in camouflage and hard hats standing on her front porch. But after a short greeting and explanation, Stephanie invited Time away from family and friends can be difficult during the holidays, but the personnel from NMCB74 assigned to Detail Guam have learned to make the best of the situation. The Detail took the opportunity of the holidays to take a couple days off from work, relax, and enjoy each other's company. The Battalion Culinary Specialists delivered again, with the presentation of an outstanding holiday spread. Work began in the early hours of the morning to ensure that a wide range Christmas tree twinkling See ADOPT page 23 Gulf Coast USO Photo courtesy of NMCB 74 Fearless Seabees pose with Stephanie and her children after sharing an assortment of gifts with them. NMCB 74's Det Guam celebrates Christmas in style with feast By Ensign Steven Kirby NMCB 74 Det Guam them into her house. The group felt comfortable in the small home when they saw the family's of expertly prepared foods was served at the 11:30 meal on Christmas Day. The menu included oven roasted turkeys, roast beef tenderloin, honey glazed ham, and an extensive list of side items. "The CS's all came together to put in a hundred percent effort to provide a quality meal for the troops; it definitely contributed to the Christmas spirit of the Battalion", said CSSN Tabitha Stoudemire. True to form, the Chiefs and Officers assigned to Detail Guam came out to show their appreciation for the troops and spread some Christmas cheer. They manned the serving line, and cleared tables on the mess decks to ensure that everyone could sit back and enjoy the day. The great meal served to the troops offered a few of the comforts of home that most were missing on the other side of the world. While she would still like to be able to spend the holidays at home with friends and family, UTCN Amber Osteen appreciated the efforts that were put forth by the galley crew. "The Christmas dinner was outstanding, it gave us the feeling of being at home while being so far away from our loved ones." 3001 6th Street, (Bldg 306), 228-5755224 FREE SERVICES AVAILABLE Fax - Send & Receive (228-575-5225), Copies (limited amount) X-Box Snacks & Drinks, Information and Referral United through Reading Program Computers (4): with web cams, Internet Access, Email Access,Yahoo, Hotmail Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8a.m. - 5 p.m.Saturday 11 a.m. - 7 p.m., Closed on Sunday January 11, 2007 Photo by MC2 Demetrius Kennon Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Dean A. Tufts embraces his daughter after returning home from a six-month deployment. Many families go through the year just trying to make it from one year to the next. Charities have been a large part of the Christmas holidays for many years. However, few are able to see the faces light up when a family receives something from a charity. The Seabee's from NMCB 74's Detail Whidbey Island were able to witness it first hand this year. UT2 Daniel Clowser had brought up the idea of supporting a family during the deployment to a Chaplain at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. After doing some research, the detail was given the name of a mother of three who was facing a dreary Christmas. A resident of Oak Harbor, Washington, illness kept "Stephanie" from working full time and in turn left her with very little income to buy presents for the children. The Fearless Seabees set out on a shopping adventure to find all that they could on the list. Although most were not the greatest fans of shopping, especially around the holidays, they cruised through the malls and stores to the best of their abilities. SK2 Lagretta Wright had one of the best eyes for deals. She continually pointed them in the right direction. After a tiring day of dodging shopping carts and excited kids throughout the stores, most of the shoppers were beat – it's not every day that a Seabee spends more than an hour in a store without looking at tools. 19 CB PG 06-19 5 oped communities in the Philippines and Indonesia. The Seabees worked hand-inhand with host nation military members as well as civilians living in recipient communities. "I have never seen a group of people work so well together," said Senior Chief Equipment Operator (SCW) Mark Thomas, Indonesia Detachment Assistant Officer in Charge, "they were teaching us as much as we were teaching them." In Iraq, 80 Seabees from NMCB 1 provided security support and military construction to a Navy-led task force. "This was a really difficult assignment for us, but it's part of our "Can Do" nature to rise to the occasion," related Builder Chief (SCW) Jeffrey Johnson, LPO for the Iraq Detachment. "My guys really took a strain, and we're just grateful to be home." Around the Far East, NMCB 1 deployed detachments to complete military construction projects at the base of Mount Fuji, in Chinhae Korea, at Naval Air Station Atsugi, at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, to fleet activities in Yokosuka, at Naval Base Sasebo and to military commanders in areas surrounding the unit's main body site at Marine Corps Base Okinawa. Two NMCB 1 detachments remained in CONUS at Camp Pendleton and San Clemente Island. When not working with cinder block and rebar, members of the unit engaged in a wide variety of community relations projects with schools, orphanages and organizations in need near Seabee detachment sites. The projects completed this deployment trained and postured the unit for their next scheduled deployment to Iraq in 2007. The command and control flexibility required to manage 18 different locations across five dif- Seabee Courier January 11, 2007 The final airlift of U.S. Navy Seabees attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) returned home on Dec. 15, officially ending a six month deployment to the Far East that found the Battalion spread across eighteen sites in nine different countries around the world. "When we deployed, our goals were three fold: provide forward contingency readiness; provide construction training; and support our customer," said Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Chad Brooks. "During our deployment we maintained a state of mission readiness that allowed us to always be ready to deploy anytime… anyplace." Deployed in task-tailored detachment teams around the globe, the construction professionals of NMCB 1 made an impact at every stage of their deployment. A team of twenty Seabees participated in infrastructure support to the U.S. Department of State by drilling wells in the Federated Republic of Micronesia on the island of Pohnpei, resulting in sustained potable water production to a population suffering from cholera and other water-bourn illnesses. "Knowing that we improved their lives, helped keep us going," said water well team member, Construction Electrician 2nd Class Leandra Cubillios. "We came to Pohnpei to improve their water, and we did that. It has been a very rewarding deployment." As participants in Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training Exercise (CARAT) 2006, teams of NMCB 1 Seabees built schools and clinics to service underdevel- Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 7 PG 7 B&W CLEAN NMCB 18 improves living conditions for Marines in Iraq By MC2 (SW/AW) Elizabeth Merriam Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group Official U.S. Navy photo January 11, 2007 Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport recently held a change of badge ceremony at morning quarters where Command Master Chief (SCW) Sean Libby (middle) relieved Command Master Chief (SCW) Joe Perrone in front of Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Darius Banaj. 6 Two construction projects slated for KAFB Medical Center By Steve Pivnick 81st Medical Group Public Affairs As Keesler Medical Center returns to pre-Katrina operations, two new construction projects are in the works. According to Maj. Jeffrey Van Slyke, 81st Medical Group, chief of construction, the construction of a new $20 million central energy plant will begin by early summer of 2007. The facility should be completed in 15 months, or fall of 2008. The energy plant will contain emergency generators, electrical switchgear, transformers, chillers, boilers and cooling towers. The facility will be designed to reduce the hurricane damage to major electrical components and significantly enhance energy production efficiencies. It will be located north of the medical center, where Oak Park housing area was before the homes were demolished after Hurricane Katrina. Also, a new $12.4 million radiation oncology center housing a linear accelerator was part of the FY07 National Defense Authorization Act. The plans for the linear accelerator are in development. Location and construction dates are to be determined. The previous linear accelerator, located in the medical center's basement, was destroyed by flooding during Katrina's storm surge. KAFB Bowling Lanes are back! Call 228-377-2817 for league information and hours of operation. Navy Reservists with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 18, Delta Company, Fort Lewis, Wash., arrived in September in Iraq and continue to work to improve the quality of life for Marines there. "As the Marines work with Iraqi army and Iraqi police and go to dangerous locations to clear out trouble, the Seabees are right beside them building and fixing," Lt. Cmdr. Michael Miner, NMCB 18 executive officer, said. "This makes them better at doing their jobs, and that is satisfying," Thanks to the work of the Seabees, Miner said, fewer Marines serving with coalition ground combat forces in Iraq have to get by with cold showers, partially protected living quarters and lack comfortable places to sleep. "We're here to support the Marines and their needs on the combat field by providing them with our construction skills," BU1 Loren Drivdahl said. "They've always been real supportive of us. They're always really happy to see us when we show up, because they know something good is going to happen. From improved living conditions, a safer place to be, or hot water for a shower, they really enjoy the things the Seabees can provide them." NMCB 18 currently is assembling 22 Southwest Asia (SWA) huts -- preconstructed living spaces shipped to the building site and put together in a short amount of time. "These huts improve living conditions. They go from a tent to a hardened heated or air-conditioned building," said BU1 Cort Souther, the crew leader for the job. "Within an hour we can prefab a whole hut, it takes about 30 minutes for the walls and about another 30 minutes for the trusses." The Seabees already have built plenty of these semipermanent quarters for Marines in Iraq. "We recently completed an order for 49 SWA huts," Drivdahl said. "We built a dozen truckloads of walls, 450 tresses and 98 doors. Since we've arrived here three months ago we've pounded over 4 tons of nails. We've just gone through a lot of production here." Other tasks for the Seabees include improvements to existing buildings, such as electric and air conditioning installation. "We went out to one of our FOBs (Forward Operating Bases) with a bunch of materials including water heaters and fixtures for showers," BU2 Gary Jones said. "We got out there and there weren't even doors on the building. It was cold out and the guys were basically sleeping in open air." The Seabees went to work building roofs, installing doors and light fixtures, and providing hot water heaters, Jones said. "They just couldn't believe the Seabees could do so much in such a short time," he added. In addition to improving the quality of life for Marines, the Seabees have offered tips to Iraqis seeking to improve their own infrastructure. "We took a trip to a small combat outpost to help out. While we were there, we showed the Iraqi police some of the basics for our job," Jones said. "We were showing them how to read a tape measure and how to use a hand saw, a lot of things they have never had exposure to. It's a nice feeling knowing that we're helping everyone else out. That's the key thing right there." Wireless Connectivity Now Available to Order through the NMCI Contract Provided by Jana Landers NCBC Information Technology Department Wireless air cards, service and accessories are now available to order through the NMCI contract. Previously, the cards and Verizon access charges were only available through FISC. Now, in addition to FISC, users have the option to order all items necessary to use this capability through the NMCI Enterprise Tool (NET). Using signals from cellular towers, laptop users are able to securely connect to the NMCI network via a commercial wireless air card when a LAN connection is not available or convenient. The following items must be ordered to use this capability: Item 0052DH (0152DH for FY08 orders) – Verizon cellular card Item 0052DJ (0152DJ for FY08 orders) – One-time installation charge required for operability Item 005DK (0152DK for FY08 orders) – Connectivity to NMCI via cellular remote access serv- Hang up and pull over. Talking on a cell phone without the use of a hands-free device while operating a motor vehicle is forbidden onboard NCBC. ice (cellular RAS) Item 0052DL (0152DL for FY08 orders) – Monthly recurring charges, such as taxes, fees, etc. At this time, Verizon is the only provider available on contract. Accessories such as antennas and wireless card carrying case are available to order. Users of the network are reminded to follow local commands policies and procedures for ordering items. For more information contact Jana Landers, (228) 871-2030. Customers can help cut extra costs by choosing paper over plastic bags By Kevin Robinson DeCA Media Relations Commissaries are hoping shoppers in the United States will say yes to paper bags for bagging their groceries as part of the Defense Commissary Agency's measures to offset recent major cost increases of plastic and paper bags. "Our customers have a really big role in this latest effort as we try to control costs while continuing to provide a premier commissary benefit. They've responded well during previous 'Say no to plastic bags and no to double bagging' campaigns so this is more of a reminder to continue using paper bags and a call for more customers to join in. The purpose is to control unnecessary costs, not inconvenience customers," said Scott Simpson, DeCA's chief operating officer. Changing bagging preferences is something most customers have been glad to do when they've been made aware of the cost issues during previous bagging campaigns. Commissaries tally nearly 100 million customer transactions annually and the agency spent about $20 million on bags last year. The cost of paper bags has increased 34 percent in the past three years, while plastic bag costs have risen 84 percent. Shipping costs offset the difference for overseas commissaries, so the paper bag emphasis isn't applied there, although double bagging is discouraged DeCAwide. Commissaries in the United States are trying to reach usage goals of about 70 percent paper and 30 percent plastic, and customers will be hearing more, "Is paper okay?" Here are some ways cus- AD SPACE tomers are helping: They're using paper bags in U.S. commissaries. They're bringing and using their own mesh or canvas tote bags. They're bringing and reusing paper or plastic bags. Customers may bring paper or plastic bags back to the commissary to use for their own grocery order, but commissaries are not able to recycle bags due to health concerns. Baggers may also refuse to use recycled bags if they appear to be damaged or contaminated. For Babies, Boomers & Everyone Else There's something for everyone in Pueblo. Hundreds of free and low-cost federal publications. Visit the website to read all of the publications and order your own copy. Don't delay! Act today! Check out www.pueblo.gsa.gov Call 1-888-8-PUEBLO for a free catalog. 18 CB PG 07-18 NCTC welcomes new command master chief PG 18 B&W 5X11.5 January 11, 2007 14:11 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 9 PG16 B&W Clean PG 9 B&W Seabee Community Notes By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 Public Affairs The pier at the Veterans Hospital in Biloxi is ready for business. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Thirty Three's Air Det completed the project early last week. Construction of the new pier began in August, with final inspection on January 4. The original pier stood for 15 years, and was con- structed by the Veteran's Association. Hurricane Katrina destroyed the structure, leaving only the original pilings standing. The effort of today's active duty sailors shows consideration and respect for those who have gone before us. Project Supervisor BU1 (SCW) Michael Cadoret is proud to have a part in the project. "Now the veterans will have a place to fish. They haven't had that for a long time." The ribbon cutting is scheduled to take place Wednesday, January 10 at 1 p.m. Photo by MC3 Jessica A. McIver BU3 Nathaniel Riffell steadies the raft below the pier as BUCN Matthew Richardson reinforces anchor bolts. 65th Annual Seabee Ball March 17, Imperial Palace, Biloxi Tickets go on sale this month! IP has rooms available at the special rate of $159 per room plus tax. Call 228 436-3000 to book at room under Seabee Ball Group #4572 or go online to www.ipbiloxi.com, follow Accommodations link, enter Group Code #4572 and follow the prompts. SESA The Senior Enlisted Spouses Association (SESA) is for spouses of E7-E9. All branches of the military are welcome. For additional information, contact SESA at sesacbc@yahoo.com. NMCB 1 FSG We would like to invite all friends and family of NMCB 1 Seabees to join us on the first Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall. Bring the kids, babysitting is available and free. The NMCB 1 FSG offers fun activities including movies, picnics, bonfires, holiday parties and lots more for the whole family. During homeport and during the deployment we are available to help support all of our NMCB 1 families and friends. If you have any questions please call the FSG president, Briana McAllister at (228) 868-8767 or email her at donzgoddess@yahoo.com. We hope to see you there. January 11, 2007 January Seabee Ball Planning Comm. Mtg., Bldg. 1, main conf. room, 1:30 p.m. 1 New Years Day Federal Holiday, DeCA commissary closed AD SPACE cult times during the deployment of our NMCB 7 men and women. We have lots of fundraisers and activities planned for the whole family. There are games and crafts for the kids and speakers on different topics for the adults. We will also have drawdowns for door prizes and refreshments each month. We meet the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck dinner at the start. Come and get together with us and meet your fellow family members. For more information on NMCB 7's FSG, contact Kathleen Whisenhunt, FSG president at kwhisenhunt@gmail.com. You can also check out nmcb7fsg@cinchouse.com and http://hub.cinchouse.com/nm cb7fsg/for more information. NMCB 74 FSG The NMCB 74 Family Support Group welcomes friends and families of NMCB 74 personnel. We encourage and promote friendly and sympathetic relationships Center Calendar Note: Commands and associations can send submissions for the community calendar to seabeecourier@navy.mil. 7 NMCB 1 FSG also has a new website that will keep you up to date on what is happening within our military family. The new website is: http://hub.cinchouse.com/n mcb1seabees. NMCB 133 FSG We would like to invite all friends and family members of NMCB 133 to join us on the first Wednesday of every month at 6:00 p.m. in the base chapel. We also do many activities such as holiday parties, fun trips, movie outings and more. During homeport we share in each others excitement and during deployments we lean on each other for support. We offer battalion information and welcome those with children, those without, wives, husbands and other loved ones. NMCB 7 FSG Come join our growing family. We are here to promote and grow social relationships and encourage interaction of spouses and family members during often trying and diffi- 10 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 2 DeCA commissary closed 11 All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 3 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 15 Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday - Federal Holiday DeCA commissary closed 4 CBC/20th SRG Wardroom Breakfast, Galley, 7 a.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 8 Quality of Life Mtg, Bldg 1 main conf. room, 10 a.m. 9 CBC All Cmdrs. Mtg, Bldg. 1, main conf. room, 10 a.m. 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Service, 10 a.m., Seabee Memorial Chapel DeCA commissary closed 17 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 18 All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 19 Seabee Ball Golf Tournament, Windance Golf Course 24 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 25 Anti-terrorism Force Protection quarterly meeting, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 1:30 p.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 26 CMDCM Melvin Girard Retirement Ceremony, Chapel, 10 a.m. Frosty 5K Lunch Time Run, 11:30 a.m. 31 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. among our family members. We have a new Careline number for battalion updates, it is 1-866-531-1101 (toll free), or 871-3650 (local). Family Support Group meetings are held every third Monday of the month at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall at 6:30 p.m. Free babysitting and activities for the children are provided. For information contact FSG President, Helen Walker at (228) 586-0114; or Secretary, Robyn Baca at (228) 539-9059. The FSG Advisor is Susan Prather, (228) 392-5945. NCTC TRI-SERVICE FSG We invite all spouses and loved ones of NCTC to join us on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30pm in the Fellowship Hall of CBC Chapel. We are offering fun activities for the family, girls night out, and fellowship among the NCTC Command. For more information, please contact our FSG President Tessa Grimes @ 865-4364 or email her at tgrimes730@hot- mail.com. Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Thrift Shop is located at the far north end of McKinney Ave, Building 16. The Thrift Shop is staffed entirely by volunteers. The retail hours of operation are Monday Thursday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. New volunteers are always welcome. Visit the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society offices at the Fleet and family Support Center, Building 30, Suite 103, or call (228) 8712610 to obtain information about becoming a part of the NMCRS volunteer team! Childcare and mileage are reimbursed. Mississippi Gulf Coast First Class Association MGCFCA is seeking new members. Meetings are every Weds at 2 p.m at CBC's Beehive, Bldg. 352. Call BU1 Reyes or CE1 Johnson at 8712145 for more information. NCBC Gate Hours Broad Ave: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Pass Road: 4:30 a.m. - midnight, 7 days a week Commission Road: 5 - 9 a.m. and 3 - 6 p.m. Mon - Fri, closed Federal holidays and weekends Canal Road (outbound only): 3 - 6 p.m. Mon - Fri, closed weekends and Federal holidays Pass and ID Office Building 117-T (adjacent to the intersection of John Paul Jones Avenue and East Eight Street (near Pass Road gate). 6 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mon - Fri 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday Closed Sunday and Federal holidays Due to lack of enrollment, the FERS retirement class scheduled for Jan. 22 - 23 is cancelled. NCBC to conduct prescribed burn in January A prescribed burn is tentatively scheduled onboard the Seabee Center the week of January 8-12, with an alternate date of January 16 -20. The burn will be conducted in conjunction with the Forestry Commission and will take place on the west end of the Center. More information on the burn can be obtained by calling Ted Ingram at 228-871-2373. 16 CB PG 09-16 Pier to Peer - NMCB 133 comes to aid of veterans January 11, 2007 14:11 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 10 PG 10 Color PG 15 color January 11, 2007 By MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB ONE Public Affairs 8 While deployed to 13 locations in the Far East in October 2006, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) ONE completed a series of block training evolutions to enhance the unit's ability to successfully meet mission oriented goals in a contingency environment. Rather than conducting a traditional field exercise (FEX), ONE decided that it was more mission effective to concentrate on specific skills, relevant to today's mission requirements. FEX, traditionally, is a graded, comprehensive exercise, focused on testing the tactical capabilities of the battalion. The evolution consisted of a number of simultaneous simulated contingency experiences meant to aid the battalion in accessing its ability to conquer adverse combat conditions. Usually, the battalion would complete a deployed FEX with the same parameters and goals in the middle of deployment. However, with the Navy's role in the ongoing War on Terror ever-changing, ONE concluded that a new type of training, block training, would provide its personnel with more subject specific, in-depth training. "Many times, the lack of resources in homeport dictates that we simulate many specific missionessential training evolutions," said Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Chad Brooks. "While deployed, we're able to take advantage of the assets and abilities of our adjacent units, providing our troops with invaluable, comprehensive training with subject matter experts." The 554th Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operations Repair Squadron Engineers (RED HORSE) Squadron, stationed on Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, was able to provide the Bee's with hands-on training using Photos by MC2 Chad Runge Above: HM1 Leo Cirino of NMCB1, watches as SKSN Shane Spuhler administers an I.V. to PSSN Michael McDonough at a combat lifesaving skills course held on Camp Shields in Okinawa, Japan. Left:BUCN Richard Pemberton, of NMCB 1 helps place a portion of a Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) platform at an exercise held on Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan. AD SPACE the same materials and parameters they would find in-theatre in the event a Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) order was received. With the assistance of RED HORSE, they were able to provide the troops with training that a normal simulation could not provide. From the initial surveying of the site; working with two different patching methods; to understanding how to properly light the runway, the Bee's were able to apply book knowledge to a real-life experience using the equipment they would normally use. The block training also provided the command with the opportunity to focus on many skills that are key to the battalions success in future deployments. Seabees learned to properly load casualties on a CH-46 Combat Support Aircraft attached to Helicopter Medium Lift (HMM) 262 at Camp Futema, also located in Okinawa, while others learned the basic operation of the weapons in the Table of Allowance (TOA) "It is important for everyone have the basic applicable knowledge of the See BLOCK page 17 NMCB 74 works to improve morale for forward units By MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB 74 Public Affairs Junction boxes hanging from the wall secured solely by live electrical wires, showers covered in mold and mud, sinks with no running water and Soldiers and Marines sleeping in areas with open sewage flowing nearby. These are just a few of the issues seven Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 would work to rectify when they left for Camp Corregidor, a small forward operating base on the outskirts of Ar Ramadi. "The living conditions were quite bad before we got here," said CE2 Johnathan Zub of NMCB 74, from Ontario, Canada. "I think it is awesome that we can be here to help lift the living conditions and spirits of those on the front lines who are risking their lives on a daily basis." Since arriving at Camp Corregidor, the Seabees have installed multiple shower units and sinks in existing buildings, built shower trailers to provide more adequate bathing and grooming facilities, rewired electrical junction boxes and outlets, built a communications room, and set up a Tactical Operations Center for the camp. "I cannot say enough about the Seabees," said First Sergeant Scott Davis with U.S. Army, E-Z Company 19. "Having these guys here truly helps raise the morale of the Soldiers and Marines and lets our troops know we are concerned about the conditions they have to For Seabee Courier delivery, contact Naval Construction Battalion Center Public Affairs at: (228) 871-3662 or send email to seabeecourier.navy.mil live in." The Seabees have received nothing but praises since their arrival at Camp Corregidor in November 2006. They have worked diligently to provide support to the troops and maintain the camp. Though a lot of hard work has been accomplished, the mission is nowhere near complete. "There is a lot of work still to be done around here," said BU2 Jason Shurtz, "Every building you go into, you see wires hanging from the ceiling, water heaters not placed properly, heating/cooling units that don't work. We try to tackle as many problems as we can, but every- day it seems someone new comes to us with another item of concern." Like Soldiers and Marines, Seabees in theatre are living up to the slogan "We Build, We Fight." "There have been times that the insurgents have tried to infiltrate the camp, and we had to take up fighting positions along side the Soldiers and Marines," said CE3 Jeremy Phillips, of Palmer, Alaska. "I see us going into more contingency environments as the war progresses. There are times I find myself scared, but I know the job we do is important to the guys here on the front lines." Photo by MC2 Gregory N. Juday CE3 Jeremy Phillips of NMCB 74 wires a breaker box at Camp Corregidor on December 21, 2006. NMCB 74 is currently deployed to Ramadi and other Southwest Asia locations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom AD SPACE 15 CB PG 10-15 COLOR NMCB ONE lays new block in Global War on Terrorism January 11, 2007 14:12 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • 11Jan07exp.qxd 1/10/2007 14:12 Page 11 PG 11 B&W PG14B&W Seatbelts are required onboard CBC Gulfport Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan The realization that possessing a college degree would be a definite asset in making a successful transition from military to civilian life upon retirement next May, motivated CUCM (SCW) Olin C. Lacy to enroll in college and crack open the text books. At his 20-year career mark he had sent out a few "feelers" to civilian companies where he though he might like to work. He found that although his military training and schooling provided valuable practical experience, those qualifications weren't enough to land the positions he wanted. "The jobs I applied for – supervisory construction or city planning required a degree", he said. Lacy readily admits that without the help and encouragement of Navy College director Kelly Curreri and counselor Alex Carter, he might not have had the nerve to pursue his bachelor's degree. Their help with transferring military experience to college credit and organizing his degree plan was invaluable. "Combining military career experience and schooling was an important factor in being able to complete my degree requirements. With the help of Kelly and Alex I became more focused. "The Navy is requiring more education – not a negative, but if you don't know exactly what you'd like to do, don't let that stop you – get your basics out of the way and take your Clep and Dantes exams." At the conclusion of our interview Master Chief Lacy ended our conversation by saying, "I'm just glad I didn't procrastinate and 'wish' I'd done it – I did!" Anyone interested in enrolling in college should stop by the Navy College Office in building 60, room 239 to talk with a counselor or call (228) 871-2785 for an appointment. Did you know that MWR has good deals on NAS Pensacola Cabin rentals for active duty military and their families? For as little as $5 per night you can enjoy a cabin on the beach. Stop by the CBC Gulfport ITT office at building 397, or call Lois at 8712231 for more information. 9 Hospital Corpsman's heroism leads to award By Lt. Cmdr. J. Bruce Walker Conus Replacement Center, Gulfport On the evening of December 11, 2006, Hospital Corpsman Nicholas E. Pchelka was enroute to the Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport to return a rental car, when he came upon the scene of a high speed motor vehicle accident. HN Pchelka immediately removed two children from the vehicle to ensure their safety, and having accomplished this, he returned to the vehicle to provide assistance to the driver, who was unconscious with a forearm fracture. After aiding the driver, by providing an open airway and establishing breathing, he worked with the local EMS personnel to safely extricate the driver, observing cervical spine precautions to prevent injury. Fully dedicated to the driver’s plight, he remained on the scene until the man was placed into the ambulance. HN Pchelka is an individual augmentee who was only in Gulfport for a short period, receiving training, outfitting and screening in support of the Global War on Terrorism. His diligent attention to provide care and assistance to his fellow man is a credit to the community and reflects positively on the United States Navy. Area Off-Limit Locations Biloxi Boulevard Club Blue Note Lounge Henry Beck Park (Henry Beck is off-limits except during daylight hours or during official organized or sponsored fraternal, charitable, religious, educational, civic or federal events.) Pascagoula Carver Village Bunksmall Apartments H&H Hideaway AD SPACE Moss Point Tony's Club 14 CB PG 11-14 Seabee Courier January 11, 2007 By Bonnie McGerr NCBC Public Affairs AD SPACE January 11, 2007 Master Chief's positive college experience proves that students come in all paygrades Official U.S. Navy photo Hospital Corpsman Nicholas E. Pchelka is congratulated by Cmdr. Scott Langley, Commanding Officer, Naval Operational Support Center after being awarded a Navy Achievement Medal for the action he took to save victims of a motor vehicle accident on December 11, 2006. Seabee Courier CUCM (SCW) Olin C. Lacy of Twentieth Seabee Readiness Group (R75) is pictured with Navy College Counselor Alex Carter after receiving a bachelor of science degree in Liberal Arts from Excelsior College. CUCM Lacy intends to pursue a career in construction management or city planning upon his retirement from the Navy this May.
    • Page 1 Seabee Courier January 11, 2007 Pg12 10 Clean Clean Naval Mobile Construction Battalion SEVEN’s (NMCB 7) khaki community, consisting of 23 officers and 36 chief petty officers recently finished their two-week field exercise (FEX) which culminated in a series of practical training evolutions at Camp Shelby, MS. The officer and chief petty officer communities from NMCB 7 were combined into four squad sized units and participated in a week of classroom instruction here at the Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport, MS. The following week NMCB 7’s khaki community was given the opportunity to apply their knowledge in the field. The classroom instruction and practical application at Camp Shelby included subjects such as mission planning, effective patrol and convoy procedures with emphasis on the IED threats, escalation of force, weapons training, COC operations and the importance of small-unit leadership. Pg13 For several chiefs and officers new to the battalion this was their first experience with a field exercise. “Two important lessons stood out from my experience during the field exercise,” said Lt. j.g. Charity Anderson. “Being placed in a position the troops will be in as a squad leader, I now have a better understanding of what their jobs are and what is expected of them. Additionally, I received the hands-on experience that I needed to an effective leader. I needed that practical understanding.” For the chiefs and officers who have been through this experience before, there is always something new to learn. “This was my third chiefs and officers FEX,” said SWCS(SCW) Edward Perry. “The experience gives us the knowledge and insight on what the troops encounter and allows us to lead them because we understand and can visualize the process- es since we’ve been there ourselves. Despite doing this before, you always learn something new or a better way to approach a problem.” For Lt. j.g. Anderson, communication and leadership are the keys to success. “This experience really opened my eyes to the importance of small-unit leadership. If you don’t have it, it’s going to be a painful process obtaining the desired result,” Anderson said. “I also needed to see how communication works up and down the chain of command and the delegation of tasks because you can’t do everything yourself.” Beginning with the chiefs and officers field exercise, NMCB 7 entered its military training phase. This phase will conclude with the battalion’s field exercise in February as NMCB 7 prepares to deploy in June. CB PG 12-13 COLOR 13:11 January 11, 2007 1/11/2007 Seabee Courier singlepage.qxd
    • 1/10/2007 14:12 Page 11 PG 11 B&W PG14B&W Seatbelts are required onboard CBC Gulfport Photo by MC1 Sean Mulligan The realization that possessing a college degree would be a definite asset in making a successful transition from military to civilian life upon retirement next May, motivated CUCM (SCW) Olin C. Lacy to enroll in college and crack open the text books. At his 20-year career mark he had sent out a few "feelers" to civilian companies where he though he might like to work. He found that although his military training and schooling provided valuable practical experience, those qualifications weren't enough to land the positions he wanted. "The jobs I applied for – supervisory construction or city planning required a degree", he said. Lacy readily admits that without the help and encouragement of Navy College director Kelly Curreri and counselor Alex Carter, he might not have had the nerve to pursue his bachelor's degree. Their help with transferring military experience to college credit and organizing his degree plan was invaluable. "Combining military career experience and schooling was an important factor in being able to complete my degree requirements. With the help of Kelly and Alex I became more focused. "The Navy is requiring more education – not a negative, but if you don't know exactly what you'd like to do, don't let that stop you – get your basics out of the way and take your Clep and Dantes exams." At the conclusion of our interview Master Chief Lacy ended our conversation by saying, "I'm just glad I didn't procrastinate and 'wish' I'd done it – I did!" Anyone interested in enrolling in college should stop by the Navy College Office in building 60, room 239 to talk with a counselor or call (228) 871-2785 for an appointment. Did you know that MWR has good deals on NAS Pensacola Cabin rentals for active duty military and their families? For as little as $5 per night you can enjoy a cabin on the beach. Stop by the CBC Gulfport ITT office at building 397, or call Lois at 8712231 for more information. 11 Hospital Corpsman's heroism leads to award By Lt. Cmdr. J. Bruce Walker Conus Replacement Center, Gulfport On the evening of December 11, 2006, Hospital Corpsman Nicholas E. Pchelka was enroute to the Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport to return a rental car, when he came upon the scene of a high speed motor vehicle accident. HN Pchelka immediately removed two children from the vehicle to ensure their safety, and having accomplished this, he returned to the vehicle to provide assistance to the driver, who was unconscious with a forearm fracture. After aiding the driver, by providing an open airway and establishing breathing, he worked with the local EMS personnel to safely extricate the driver, observing cervical spine precautions to prevent injury. Fully dedicated to the driver’s plight, he remained on the scene until the man was placed into the ambulance. HN Pchelka is an individual augmentee who was only in Gulfport for a short period, receiving training, outfitting and screening in support of the Global War on Terrorism. His diligent attention to provide care and assistance to his fellow man is a credit to the community and reflects positively on the United States Navy. Area Off-Limit Locations Biloxi Boulevard Club Blue Note Lounge Henry Beck Park (Henry Beck is off-limits except during daylight hours or during official organized or sponsored fraternal, charitable, religious, educational, civic or federal events.) Pascagoula Carver Village Bunksmall Apartments H&H Hideaway AD SPACE Moss Point Tony's Club 11 CB PG 11-14 January 11, 2007 By Bonnie McGerr NCBC Public Affairs AD SPACE January 11, 2007 Master Chief's positive college experience proves that students come in all paygrades Official U.S. Navy photo Hospital Corpsman Nicholas E. Pchelka is congratulated by Cmdr. Scott Langley, Commanding Officer, Naval Operational Support Center after being awarded a Navy Achievement Medal for the action he took to save victims of a motor vehicle accident on December 11, 2006. Seabee Courier CUCM (SCW) Olin C. Lacy of Twentieth Seabee Readiness Group (R75) is pictured with Navy College Counselor Alex Carter after receiving a bachelor of science degree in Liberal Arts from Excelsior College. CUCM Lacy intends to pursue a career in construction management or city planning upon his retirement from the Navy this May. Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 10 PG 10 Color PG 15 color January 11, 2007 By MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB ONE Public Affairs 10 While deployed to 13 locations in the Far East in October 2006, Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) ONE completed a series of block training evolutions to enhance the unit's ability to successfully meet mission oriented goals in a contingency environment. Rather than conducting a traditional field exercise (FEX), ONE decided that it was more mission effective to concentrate on specific skills, relevant to today's mission requirements. FEX, traditionally, is a graded, comprehensive exercise, focused on testing the tactical capabilities of the battalion. The evolution consisted of a number of simultaneous simulated contingency experiences meant to aid the battalion in accessing its ability to conquer adverse combat conditions. Usually, the battalion would complete a deployed FEX with the same parameters and goals in the middle of deployment. However, with the Navy's role in the ongoing War on Terror ever-changing, ONE concluded that a new type of training, block training, would provide its personnel with more subject specific, in-depth training. "Many times, the lack of resources in homeport dictates that we simulate many specific missionessential training evolutions," said Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Chad Brooks. "While deployed, we're able to take advantage of the assets and abilities of our adjacent units, providing our troops with invaluable, comprehensive training with subject matter experts." The 554th Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operations Repair Squadron Engineers (RED HORSE) Squadron, stationed on Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, was able to provide the Bee's with hands-on training using Photos by MC2 Chad Runge Above: HM1 Leo Cirino of NMCB1, watches as SKSN Shane Spuhler administers an I.V. to PSSN Michael McDonough at a combat lifesaving skills course held on Camp Shields in Okinawa, Japan. Left:BUCN Richard Pemberton, of NMCB 1 helps place a portion of a Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) platform at an exercise held on Kadena Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan. AD SPACE the same materials and parameters they would find in-theatre in the event a Rapid Runway Repair (RRR) order was received. With the assistance of RED HORSE, they were able to provide the troops with training that a normal simulation could not provide. From the initial surveying of the site; working with two different patching methods; to understanding how to properly light the runway, the Bee's were able to apply book knowledge to a real-life experience using the equipment they would normally use. The block training also provided the command with the opportunity to focus on many skills that are key to the battalions success in future deployments. Seabees learned to properly load casualties on a CH-46 Combat Support Aircraft attached to Helicopter Medium Lift (HMM) 262 at Camp Futema, also located in Okinawa, while others learned the basic operation of the weapons in the Table of Allowance (TOA) "It is important for everyone have the basic applicable knowledge of the See BLOCK page 23 NMCB 74 works to improve morale for forward units By MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB 74 Public Affairs Junction boxes hanging from the wall secured solely by live electrical wires, showers covered in mold and mud, sinks with no running water and Soldiers and Marines sleeping in areas with open sewage flowing nearby. These are just a few of the issues seven Seabees from Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 74 would work to rectify when they left for Camp Corregidor, a small forward operating base on the outskirts of Ar Ramadi. "The living conditions were quite bad before we got here," said CE2 Johnathan Zub of NMCB 74, from Ontario, Canada. "I think it is awesome that we can be here to help lift the living conditions and spirits of those on the front lines who are risking their lives on a daily basis." Since arriving at Camp Corregidor, the Seabees have installed multiple shower units and sinks in existing buildings, built shower trailers to provide more adequate bathing and grooming facilities, rewired electrical junction boxes and outlets, built a communications room, and set up a Tactical Operations Center for the camp. "I cannot say enough about the Seabees," said First Sergeant Scott Davis with U.S. Army, E-Z Company 19. "Having these guys here truly helps raise the morale of the Soldiers and Marines and lets our troops know we are concerned about the conditions they have to For Seabee Courier delivery, contact Naval Construction Battalion Center Public Affairs at: (228) 871-3662 or send email to seabeecourier.navy.mil live in." The Seabees have received nothing but praises since their arrival at Camp Corregidor in November 2006. They have worked diligently to provide support to the troops and maintain the camp. Though a lot of hard work has been accomplished, the mission is nowhere near complete. "There is a lot of work still to be done around here," said BU2 Jason Shurtz, "Every building you go into, you see wires hanging from the ceiling, water heaters not placed properly, heating/cooling units that don't work. We try to tackle as many problems as we can, but every- day it seems someone new comes to us with another item of concern." Like Soldiers and Marines, Seabees in theatre are living up to the slogan "We Build, We Fight." "There have been times that the insurgents have tried to infiltrate the camp, and we had to take up fighting positions along side the Soldiers and Marines," said CE3 Jeremy Phillips, of Palmer, Alaska. "I see us going into more contingency environments as the war progresses. There are times I find myself scared, but I know the job we do is important to the guys here on the front lines." Photo by MC2 Gregory N. Juday CE3 Jeremy Phillips of NMCB 74 wires a breaker box at Camp Corregidor on December 21, 2006. NMCB 74 is currently deployed to Ramadi and other Southwest Asia locations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom AD SPACE 12 CB PG 10-15 COLOR NMCB ONE lays new block in Global War on Terrorism January 11, 2007 14:12 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 9 PG16 B&W Clean PG 9 B&W Seabee Community Notes By MC3 Jessica A. McIver NMCB 133 Public Affairs The pier at the Veterans Hospital in Biloxi is ready for business. Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Thirty Three's Air Det completed the project early last week. Construction of the new pier began in August, with final inspection on January 4. The original pier stood for 15 years, and was con- structed by the Veteran's Association. Hurricane Katrina destroyed the structure, leaving only the original pilings standing. The effort of today's active duty sailors shows consideration and respect for those who have gone before us. Project Supervisor BU1 (SCW) Michael Cadoret is proud to have a part in the project. "Now the veterans will have a place to fish. They haven't had that for a long time." The ribbon cutting is scheduled to take place Wednesday, January 10 at 1 p.m. Photo by MC3 Jessica A. McIver BU3 Nathaniel Riffell steadies the raft below the pier as BUCN Matthew Richardson reinforces anchor bolts. 65th Annual Seabee Ball March 17, Imperial Palace, Biloxi Tickets go on sale this month! IP has rooms available at the special rate of $159 per room plus tax. Call 228 436-3000 to book at room under Seabee Ball Group #4572 or go online to www.ipbiloxi.com, follow Accommodations link, enter Group Code #4572 and follow the prompts. SESA The Senior Enlisted Spouses Association (SESA) is for spouses of E7-E9. All branches of the military are welcome. For additional information, contact SESA at sesacbc@yahoo.com. NMCB 1 FSG We would like to invite all friends and family of NMCB 1 Seabees to join us on the first Thursday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall. Bring the kids, babysitting is available and free. The NMCB 1 FSG offers fun activities including movies, picnics, bonfires, holiday parties and lots more for the whole family. During homeport and during the deployment we are available to help support all of our NMCB 1 families and friends. If you have any questions please call the FSG president, Briana McAllister at (228) 868-8767 or email her at donzgoddess@yahoo.com. We hope to see you there. January 11, 2007 January Seabee Ball Planning Comm. Mtg., Bldg. 1, main conf. room, 1:30 p.m. 1 New Years Day Federal Holiday, DeCA commissary closed AD SPACE cult times during the deployment of our NMCB 7 men and women. We have lots of fundraisers and activities planned for the whole family. There are games and crafts for the kids and speakers on different topics for the adults. We will also have drawdowns for door prizes and refreshments each month. We meet the 3rd Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck dinner at the start. Come and get together with us and meet your fellow family members. For more information on NMCB 7's FSG, contact Kathleen Whisenhunt, FSG president at kwhisenhunt@gmail.com. You can also check out nmcb7fsg@cinchouse.com and http://hub.cinchouse.com/nm cb7fsg/for more information. NMCB 74 FSG The NMCB 74 Family Support Group welcomes friends and families of NMCB 74 personnel. We encourage and promote friendly and sympathetic relationships Center Calendar Note: Commands and associations can send submissions for the community calendar to seabeecourier@navy.mil. 9 NMCB 1 FSG also has a new website that will keep you up to date on what is happening within our military family. The new website is: http://hub.cinchouse.com/n mcb1seabees. NMCB 133 FSG We would like to invite all friends and family members of NMCB 133 to join us on the first Wednesday of every month at 6:00 p.m. in the base chapel. We also do many activities such as holiday parties, fun trips, movie outings and more. During homeport we share in each others excitement and during deployments we lean on each other for support. We offer battalion information and welcome those with children, those without, wives, husbands and other loved ones. NMCB 7 FSG Come join our growing family. We are here to promote and grow social relationships and encourage interaction of spouses and family members during often trying and diffi- 10 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 2 DeCA commissary closed 11 All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 3 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 15 Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday - Federal Holiday DeCA commissary closed 4 CBC/20th SRG Wardroom Breakfast, Galley, 7 a.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 8 Quality of Life Mtg, Bldg 1 main conf. room, 10 a.m. 9 CBC All Cmdrs. Mtg, Bldg. 1, main conf. room, 10 a.m. 16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Service, 10 a.m., Seabee Memorial Chapel DeCA commissary closed 17 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 18 All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 19 Seabee Ball Golf Tournament, Windance Golf Course 24 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 25 Anti-terrorism Force Protection quarterly meeting, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 1:30 p.m. All Khaki Social, A&E, 3 p.m. 26 CMDCM Melvin Girard Retirement Ceremony, Chapel, 10 a.m. Frosty 5K Lunch Time Run, 11:30 a.m. 31 Lunchtime Bible Study, Bldg. 1 main conf. room, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. among our family members. We have a new Careline number for battalion updates, it is 1-866-531-1101 (toll free), or 871-3650 (local). Family Support Group meetings are held every third Monday of the month at the CBC Chapel in Fellowship Hall at 6:30 p.m. Free babysitting and activities for the children are provided. For information contact FSG President, Helen Walker at (228) 586-0114; or Secretary, Robyn Baca at (228) 539-9059. The FSG Advisor is Susan Prather, (228) 392-5945. NCTC TRI-SERVICE FSG We invite all spouses and loved ones of NCTC to join us on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30pm in the Fellowship Hall of CBC Chapel. We are offering fun activities for the family, girls night out, and fellowship among the NCTC Command. For more information, please contact our FSG President Tessa Grimes @ 865-4364 or email her at tgrimes730@hot- mail.com. Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Thrift Shop is located at the far north end of McKinney Ave, Building 16. The Thrift Shop is staffed entirely by volunteers. The retail hours of operation are Monday Thursday, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. New volunteers are always welcome. Visit the NavyMarine Corps Relief Society offices at the Fleet and family Support Center, Building 30, Suite 103, or call (228) 8712610 to obtain information about becoming a part of the NMCRS volunteer team! Childcare and mileage are reimbursed. Mississippi Gulf Coast First Class Association MGCFCA is seeking new members. Meetings are every Weds at 2 p.m at CBC's Beehive, Bldg. 352. Call BU1 Reyes or CE1 Johnson at 8712145 for more information. NCBC Gate Hours Broad Ave: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Pass Road: 4:30 a.m. - midnight, 7 days a week Commission Road: 5 - 9 a.m. and 3 - 6 p.m. Mon - Fri, closed Federal holidays and weekends Canal Road (outbound only): 3 - 6 p.m. Mon - Fri, closed weekends and Federal holidays Pass and ID Office Building 117-T (adjacent to the intersection of John Paul Jones Avenue and East Eight Street (near Pass Road gate). 6 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mon - Fri 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday Closed Sunday and Federal holidays Due to lack of enrollment, the FERS retirement class scheduled for Jan. 22 - 23 is cancelled. NCBC to conduct prescribed burn in January A prescribed burn is tentatively scheduled onboard the Seabee Center the week of January 8-12, with an alternate date of January 16 -20. The burn will be conducted in conjunction with the Forestry Commission and will take place on the west end of the Center. More information on the burn can be obtained by calling Ted Ingram at 228-871-2373. 13 CB PG 09-16 Pier to Peer - NMCB 133 comes to aid of veterans January 11, 2007 14:11 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 8 PG 17 Color CLEAN A&E CBC Fitness Center Activities "Frosty 5K" Jan 26, 11:30 Mark your calendars for a lunch time run in the heat of the day Friday 26 January. We will kick off the run 11:30 sharp on the track. The run is free to all eligible patrons. We will give away t-shirts to the first 300 runners. "Burn off the Holidays" January Challenge How many calories can you burn in a month?? Calories burned will be determined by the cardio equipment. Advice from one of our fitness staff will help you reach your New Years Resolution goals. Look to the bulletin boards in the CBC fitness center for more details. Karate Classes offered Taekwondo classes are being offered Wednesday and Fridays 6 - 7 p.m. You must be 10 years of age or older to participate. Classes are free to all eligible patrons. The classes will cover the following: Stretching and warm up Form pattern and stances Self Defense Kicking and blocking drills Cool down/ceremo- ny meditation Sparring Training and Testing Participants will be required to purchase uniform and protective equipment. Participants who complete the course will receive International certification. Participants who earn the next color belt will be charged a $30.00 testing fee which covers certification and new belt. Black belt testing is through the International Taekwondo Federation and includes additional testing fees. January 11, 2007 Pine Bayou Golf Course 8 The next FREE golf clinic is Jan.13, 2007 at 11:00. The first 20 students will fill up the clinic, range balls are included and rental clubs if needed. The next golf tournament will be Feb. 17 start time is 0800; format is stroke play with Handicaps. Call the Pro Shop for any questions and you can also sign up. The fee is TBA later because of the New Snack Bar in the Club House the fee will include food and drink with your entry fee. The entry forms will be in the Pro Shop with the details. We over seeded the Tees and Greens, the seed will make all the Greens better and smoother to play on. If you have any Questions or comments please see Palmer Proctor, Director of Golf for Pine Bayou G.C. Thank you for your support and have fun on your next round of golf. Don't forget about Thursday's Social at A&E. A&E will only be opened Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays now. There is a newly recovered pool table. Come on in and play FOR FREE! You may also book A&E on any day that it is closed. For Further info, please contact Pat Gray at 871-2538 BeeHive ITT Disney Trip-- Purchase your Disney, Universal, and SeaWorld tickets now for the Orlando Trip Feb. 17-20. We will depart from CBC on Feb 17 at 8 a.m.and return on early evening on Feb. 20. Trip includes round trip transportation on 55-passenger deluxe motorcoach, 3 nights hotel accommodations at the Ramada Plaza Resort, and your choice of theme park tickets - 2 days at Disney World OR 1 day Disney & 1 day Universal Studios or Sea World OR 1 day Universal Studios & 1 day Sea World. Prices vary by number of people in room… please call Lois at 228-871-2231 for more info. Outdoor Recreation Come on by and check out our NEW rental equipment! Auto Hobby Shop Tired of using your old rusty tools? Well, come on by and check out our new tools! Shields RV Park Office Hours 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Contact RV Campground Host at 228-871-5435 for reservation information. At the Movies Jan 11, 11:30 , Flushed Away, PG Jan 12, 11:30 , Open Season, PG; 6:30, Catch a Fire, PG13 Jan 13, 11:30 , Open Season, PG; 1:30, Flushed Away, PG; 3:30, The Black Dahlia, R; 6:00, The Guardian, PG13 Jan 14, 11:30, The Return, PG13; 1:30, The Night Listener, R; 3:30, The Marine, PG13 Jan 16, 11:30, Texas Chainsaw Massacre - The Beginning, R Jan 17, 11:30, The Departed, R Jan 18, 11:30, The Guardian, PG 13 Jan 19, 11:30, The Marine, PG13; 6:30, Flyboys, PG13 Jan 20, 11:30 , Crank, R; 1:30, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, The Beginning, R; 3:30, Flushed Away, PG; 6:00, The Departed, R Jan 21, 11:30, Flicka, PG; 1:30, Open Season, PG; 3:30, Employee of the Month, PG13 Jan 22, 11:30, The Night Listener, R Jan 23, 11:30 , The Return, R All Movies are FREE! Jan 24, 11:30, Catch a Fire, PG13 Jan 25, 11:30, Crank, R Don't forget Friday's Social. There is a newly recovered pool table. Come on in and play FOR FREE! Closed on Sundays.You may book the bar, patio, or conference room for any occasion. Contact Pat Gray at 871-2538 for more info. Youth Activities Center Jan 2 5:30 to 8:30 Teen Only! Keystone Meeting Free Pizza for All!! Jan3 5:30 to 8:30 Street Smart Program Jan 4 5:30 to 8:30 Bezerk Bingo! Prizes Awarded Jan 5 6:00 to 9:00 Youth & Teen Movie & Hotdog Night! Only $1.00 Jan 6 10:00 to 5:00 Rock Climbing @ Slidell Rocks Only $8.00 Jan 9 5:30 to 8:30 Torch Club Meeting & Poster Making Contest Jan 10 5:30 to 8:30 Computer, Pool & Indoor Games Jan 11 5:30 to 8:30 Craziest Hairstyle Night! Prizes Awarded Jan 12 6:00 to 9:00 Youth & Teen Movies & Smores Night! Only $1.00 Jan 13 10:00 to 4:00 Stennis Space Center! Only $2.50 Jan 16 5:30 to 8:30 Martin Luther King Jr. Crafts & Activities Jan 17 5:30 to 8:30 Street Smart Program Jan 18 5:30 to 8:30 Wild & Wacky Relay Races & Tag Games Jan 19 6:00 to 9:00 Youth & Teen Movie & Popcorn Night! Only $1.00 Jan 20 11:00 to 4:00 Bowling at Gaude Lanes! Only $5.00 Jan 23 5:30 to 8:30 Girls Only Night! Jan 24 5:30 to 8:30 Extreme Scavenger Hunt! Jan 25 5:30 to 8:30 Wacky, Tacky Outfit Day! Prizes Awarded! Jan 26 6:00 to 9:00 Youth & Teen Movie & Nacho Night! Only $1.00 Jan 27 1:00 to 5:00 Swimming at Biloxi Natatorium! Only $3.00 Jan 30 5:30 to 8:30 Boys Only Night! Jan 31 5:30 to 8:30 Youth Bucks Auction!!! 14 CB PG 08-17 COLOR PG 8 COLOR ADS January 11, 2007 14:11 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 7 PG 7 B&W CLEAN NMCB 18 improves living conditions for Marines in Iraq By MC2 (SW/AW) Elizabeth Merriam Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group Official U.S. Navy photo January 11, 2007 Naval Construction Training Center Gulfport recently held a change of badge ceremony at morning quarters where Command Master Chief (SCW) Sean Libby (middle) relieved Command Master Chief (SCW) Joe Perrone in front of Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Darius Banaj. 7 Two construction projects slated for KAFB Medical Center By Steve Pivnick 81st Medical Group Public Affairs As Keesler Medical Center returns to pre-Katrina operations, two new construction projects are in the works. According to Maj. Jeffrey Van Slyke, 81st Medical Group, chief of construction, the construction of a new $20 million central energy plant will begin by early summer of 2007. The facility should be completed in 15 months, or fall of 2008. The energy plant will contain emergency generators, electrical switchgear, transformers, chillers, boilers and cooling towers. The facility will be designed to reduce the hurricane damage to major electrical components and significantly enhance energy production efficiencies. It will be located north of the medical center, where Oak Park housing area was before the homes were demolished after Hurricane Katrina. Also, a new $12.4 million radiation oncology center housing a linear accelerator was part of the FY07 National Defense Authorization Act. The plans for the linear accelerator are in development. Location and construction dates are to be determined. The previous linear accelerator, located in the medical center's basement, was destroyed by flooding during Katrina's storm surge. KAFB Bowling Lanes are back! Call 228-377-2817 for league information and hours of operation. Navy Reservists with Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 18, Delta Company, Fort Lewis, Wash., arrived in September in Iraq and continue to work to improve the quality of life for Marines there. "As the Marines work with Iraqi army and Iraqi police and go to dangerous locations to clear out trouble, the Seabees are right beside them building and fixing," Lt. Cmdr. Michael Miner, NMCB 18 executive officer, said. "This makes them better at doing their jobs, and that is satisfying," Thanks to the work of the Seabees, Miner said, fewer Marines serving with coalition ground combat forces in Iraq have to get by with cold showers, partially protected living quarters and lack comfortable places to sleep. "We're here to support the Marines and their needs on the combat field by providing them with our construction skills," BU1 Loren Drivdahl said. "They've always been real supportive of us. They're always really happy to see us when we show up, because they know something good is going to happen. From improved living conditions, a safer place to be, or hot water for a shower, they really enjoy the things the Seabees can provide them." NMCB 18 currently is assembling 22 Southwest Asia (SWA) huts -- preconstructed living spaces shipped to the building site and put together in a short amount of time. "These huts improve living conditions. They go from a tent to a hardened heated or air-conditioned building," said BU1 Cort Souther, the crew leader for the job. "Within an hour we can prefab a whole hut, it takes about 30 minutes for the walls and about another 30 minutes for the trusses." The Seabees already have built plenty of these semipermanent quarters for Marines in Iraq. "We recently completed an order for 49 SWA huts," Drivdahl said. "We built a dozen truckloads of walls, 450 tresses and 98 doors. Since we've arrived here three months ago we've pounded over 4 tons of nails. We've just gone through a lot of production here." Other tasks for the Seabees include improvements to existing buildings, such as electric and air conditioning installation. "We went out to one of our FOBs (Forward Operating Bases) with a bunch of materials including water heaters and fixtures for showers," BU2 Gary Jones said. "We got out there and there weren't even doors on the building. It was cold out and the guys were basically sleeping in open air." The Seabees went to work building roofs, installing doors and light fixtures, and providing hot water heaters, Jones said. "They just couldn't believe the Seabees could do so much in such a short time," he added. In addition to improving the quality of life for Marines, the Seabees have offered tips to Iraqis seeking to improve their own infrastructure. "We took a trip to a small combat outpost to help out. While we were there, we showed the Iraqi police some of the basics for our job," Jones said. "We were showing them how to read a tape measure and how to use a hand saw, a lot of things they have never had exposure to. It's a nice feeling knowing that we're helping everyone else out. That's the key thing right there." Wireless Connectivity Now Available to Order through the NMCI Contract Provided by Jana Landers NCBC Information Technology Department Wireless air cards, service and accessories are now available to order through the NMCI contract. Previously, the cards and Verizon access charges were only available through FISC. Now, in addition to FISC, users have the option to order all items necessary to use this capability through the NMCI Enterprise Tool (NET). Using signals from cellular towers, laptop users are able to securely connect to the NMCI network via a commercial wireless air card when a LAN connection is not available or convenient. The following items must be ordered to use this capability: Item 0052DH (0152DH for FY08 orders) – Verizon cellular card Item 0052DJ (0152DJ for FY08 orders) – One-time installation charge required for operability Item 005DK (0152DK for FY08 orders) – Connectivity to NMCI via cellular remote access serv- Hang up and pull over. Talking on a cell phone without the use of a hands-free device while operating a motor vehicle is forbidden onboard NCBC. ice (cellular RAS) Item 0052DL (0152DL for FY08 orders) – Monthly recurring charges, such as taxes, fees, etc. At this time, Verizon is the only provider available on contract. Accessories such as antennas and wireless card carrying case are available to order. Users of the network are reminded to follow local commands policies and procedures for ordering items. For more information contact Jana Landers, (228) 871-2030. Customers can help cut extra costs by choosing paper over plastic bags By Kevin Robinson DeCA Media Relations Commissaries are hoping shoppers in the United States will say yes to paper bags for bagging their groceries as part of the Defense Commissary Agency's measures to offset recent major cost increases of plastic and paper bags. "Our customers have a really big role in this latest effort as we try to control costs while continuing to provide a premier commissary benefit. They've responded well during previous 'Say no to plastic bags and no to double bagging' campaigns so this is more of a reminder to continue using paper bags and a call for more customers to join in. The purpose is to control unnecessary costs, not inconvenience customers," said Scott Simpson, DeCA's chief operating officer. Changing bagging preferences is something most customers have been glad to do when they've been made aware of the cost issues during previous bagging campaigns. Commissaries tally nearly 100 million customer transactions annually and the agency spent about $20 million on bags last year. The cost of paper bags has increased 34 percent in the past three years, while plastic bag costs have risen 84 percent. Shipping costs offset the difference for overseas commissaries, so the paper bag emphasis isn't applied there, although double bagging is discouraged DeCAwide. Commissaries in the United States are trying to reach usage goals of about 70 percent paper and 30 percent plastic, and customers will be hearing more, "Is paper okay?" Here are some ways cus- AD SPACE tomers are helping: They're using paper bags in U.S. commissaries. They're bringing and using their own mesh or canvas tote bags. They're bringing and reusing paper or plastic bags. Customers may bring paper or plastic bags back to the commissary to use for their own grocery order, but commissaries are not able to recycle bags due to health concerns. Baggers may also refuse to use recycled bags if they appear to be damaged or contaminated. For Babies, Boomers & Everyone Else There's something for everyone in Pueblo. Hundreds of free and low-cost federal publications. Visit the website to read all of the publications and order your own copy. Don't delay! Act today! Check out www.pueblo.gsa.gov Call 1-888-8-PUEBLO for a free catalog. 15 CB PG 07-18 NCTC welcomes new command master chief PG 18 B&W 5X11.5 January 11, 2007 14:11 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • 1/10/2007 14:11 Page 6 PG 6 B&W CLEAN PG 19 B&W 2 Col. Cln NMCB 1 completes diverse Far East deployment 74's Det Whidbey Island adopts family for holidays By MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB 1 Public Affairs By SW1 (SCW) Donald Farwell NMCB 74 Det Whidbey Island ferent time zones, and the agility to deploy and redeploy task-tailored teams to diverse missions will serve the unit well in OIF. "While deployed it was imperative that we foster relationships with other service branch commanders and learn to assess their needs and assert our capabilities," said Brooks. "When we deploy with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force, we need to already be familiar and efficient in our ability to move, complete short duration projects, and move again; because that is what will be expected of us in a contingency environment." Cmdr. Dean Tufts, who assumed command of NMCB 1 in July 2006 related the serious nature of deploying to primarily non-combat detachment locations. "Right now, there are Seabees from Gulfport operating on the tip of the spear in Iraq. There is little room for error. What we do on deployment to Japan, Korea, and the states has to be good, and we have to sharpen our skills now, because we know we'll have to hit the ground running next year." Photo by MC2 Demetrius Kennon Friends and family of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion ONE's (NMCB 1) Seabees anxiously await the battalion's arrival at Trent Lott Air National Guard Base Dec. 15, 2006. NMCB 1 recently completed a regularly scheduled deployment to the Far East. On Christmas Day, the Seabees loaded their truck with gifts for the family and embarked on a surprise holiday delivery. Not knowing what kind of reception they would get, they soon arrived at Stephanie's house. They couldn't help wondering what went through Stephanie's mind when she saw a group of people dressed in camouflage and hard hats standing on her front porch. But after a short greeting and explanation, Stephanie invited Time away from family and friends can be difficult during the holidays, but the personnel from NMCB74 assigned to Detail Guam have learned to make the best of the situation. The Detail took the opportunity of the holidays to take a couple days off from work, relax, and enjoy each other's company. The Battalion Culinary Specialists delivered again, with the presentation of an outstanding holiday spread. Work began in the early hours of the morning to ensure that a wide range Christmas tree twinkling See ADOPT page 17 Gulf Coast USO Photo courtesy of NMCB 74 Fearless Seabees pose with Stephanie and her children after sharing an assortment of gifts with them. NMCB 74's Det Guam celebrates Christmas in style with feast By Ensign Steven Kirby NMCB 74 Det Guam them into her house. The group felt comfortable in the small home when they saw the family's of expertly prepared foods was served at the 11:30 meal on Christmas Day. The menu included oven roasted turkeys, roast beef tenderloin, honey glazed ham, and an extensive list of side items. "The CS's all came together to put in a hundred percent effort to provide a quality meal for the troops; it definitely contributed to the Christmas spirit of the Battalion", said CSSN Tabitha Stoudemire. True to form, the Chiefs and Officers assigned to Detail Guam came out to show their appreciation for the troops and spread some Christmas cheer. They manned the serving line, and cleared tables on the mess decks to ensure that everyone could sit back and enjoy the day. The great meal served to the troops offered a few of the comforts of home that most were missing on the other side of the world. While she would still like to be able to spend the holidays at home with friends and family, UTCN Amber Osteen appreciated the efforts that were put forth by the galley crew. "The Christmas dinner was outstanding, it gave us the feeling of being at home while being so far away from our loved ones." 3001 6th Street, (Bldg 306), 228-5755224 FREE SERVICES AVAILABLE Fax - Send & Receive (228-575-5225), Copies (limited amount) X-Box Snacks & Drinks, Information and Referral United through Reading Program Computers (4): with web cams, Internet Access, Email Access,Yahoo, Hotmail Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8a.m. - 5 p.m.Saturday 11 a.m. - 7 p.m., Closed on Sunday January 11, 2007 Photo by MC2 Demetrius Kennon Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Dean A. Tufts embraces his daughter after returning home from a six-month deployment. Many families go through the year just trying to make it from one year to the next. Charities have been a large part of the Christmas holidays for many years. However, few are able to see the faces light up when a family receives something from a charity. The Seabee's from NMCB 74's Detail Whidbey Island were able to witness it first hand this year. UT2 Daniel Clowser had brought up the idea of supporting a family during the deployment to a Chaplain at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. After doing some research, the detail was given the name of a mother of three who was facing a dreary Christmas. A resident of Oak Harbor, Washington, illness kept "Stephanie" from working full time and in turn left her with very little income to buy presents for the children. The Fearless Seabees set out on a shopping adventure to find all that they could on the list. Although most were not the greatest fans of shopping, especially around the holidays, they cruised through the malls and stores to the best of their abilities. SK2 Lagretta Wright had one of the best eyes for deals. She continually pointed them in the right direction. After a tiring day of dodging shopping carts and excited kids throughout the stores, most of the shoppers were beat – it's not every day that a Seabee spends more than an hour in a store without looking at tools. 16 CB PG 06-19 6 oped communities in the Philippines and Indonesia. The Seabees worked hand-inhand with host nation military members as well as civilians living in recipient communities. "I have never seen a group of people work so well together," said Senior Chief Equipment Operator (SCW) Mark Thomas, Indonesia Detachment Assistant Officer in Charge, "they were teaching us as much as we were teaching them." In Iraq, 80 Seabees from NMCB 1 provided security support and military construction to a Navy-led task force. "This was a really difficult assignment for us, but it's part of our "Can Do" nature to rise to the occasion," related Builder Chief (SCW) Jeffrey Johnson, LPO for the Iraq Detachment. "My guys really took a strain, and we're just grateful to be home." Around the Far East, NMCB 1 deployed detachments to complete military construction projects at the base of Mount Fuji, in Chinhae Korea, at Naval Air Station Atsugi, at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, to fleet activities in Yokosuka, at Naval Base Sasebo and to military commanders in areas surrounding the unit's main body site at Marine Corps Base Okinawa. Two NMCB 1 detachments remained in CONUS at Camp Pendleton and San Clemente Island. When not working with cinder block and rebar, members of the unit engaged in a wide variety of community relations projects with schools, orphanages and organizations in need near Seabee detachment sites. The projects completed this deployment trained and postured the unit for their next scheduled deployment to Iraq in 2007. The command and control flexibility required to manage 18 different locations across five dif- Seabee Courier January 11, 2007 The final airlift of U.S. Navy Seabees attached to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion One (NMCB 1) returned home on Dec. 15, officially ending a six month deployment to the Far East that found the Battalion spread across eighteen sites in nine different countries around the world. "When we deployed, our goals were three fold: provide forward contingency readiness; provide construction training; and support our customer," said Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Chad Brooks. "During our deployment we maintained a state of mission readiness that allowed us to always be ready to deploy anytime… anyplace." Deployed in task-tailored detachment teams around the globe, the construction professionals of NMCB 1 made an impact at every stage of their deployment. A team of twenty Seabees participated in infrastructure support to the U.S. Department of State by drilling wells in the Federated Republic of Micronesia on the island of Pohnpei, resulting in sustained potable water production to a population suffering from cholera and other water-bourn illnesses. "Knowing that we improved their lives, helped keep us going," said water well team member, Construction Electrician 2nd Class Leandra Cubillios. "We came to Pohnpei to improve their water, and we did that. It has been a very rewarding deployment." As participants in Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training Exercise (CARAT) 2006, teams of NMCB 1 Seabees built schools and clinics to service underdevel- Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd
    • Page 2 PG 2 B&W CLEAN PG 23 B&W “We EXIST to enable Warfighter Readiness” NCBC/20SRG Commanding Officer Capt. Van Dobson Executive Officer Cmdr. Bill Finn Public Affairs Officer Jean Remley Editor Bonnie L. McGerr Mass Comm. Specialist MC1 Sean Mulligan 22ND NCR Commander Capt. Eric Odderstol Public Affairs Officer Lt. Cmdr. Kyra Hawn NMCB ONE Commanding Officer Cmdr. Dean A. Tufts Public Affairs Officer Lt. Kris Portacci Mass. Comm. Specialists MC2 Chad Runge MC3 Ja'lon Rhinehart NMCB SEVEN Commanding Officer Cmdr. David J. Sasek Public Affairs Officer Ensign Russell Becker Mass Comm. Specialists MCC Jeffrey J. Pierce MC3 Paul D. Williams NMCB SEVENTY FOUR Commanding Officer Cmdr. Craig S. Prather Public Affairs Officer Lt. Edsil L. Logan Mass Comm. Specialist MC2 Gregory N. Juday NMCB ONE THIRTY THREE January 11, 2007 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Allan Stratman Public Affairs Officer Lt.j.g. Amy Yoon Mass Comm. Specialist MC3 Jessica A. McIver 2 NCTC Gulfport Commanding Officer Cmdr. Darius Banaji Public Affairs Officer BU1(SCW) James LePage The Seabee Courier is an authorized publication for members of the military services and their families. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views of the U.S. Government, the DoD or the U.S. Navy and do not imply endorsement thereof. The appearance of advertising in this newspaper, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U. S. Government, DoD, the Navy, NCBC Gulfport or Gulf Publishing Company of the products and services advertised. All content in this newspaper shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The Seabee Courier is published 22 weeks a year by Gulf Publishing Company, a private firm in no way connected with the DoD , under an exclusive contract with the U. S. Navy. The Seabee Courier solicits news contributions from military and civilian sources, but the Public Affairs staff reserves the right to edit and/or rewrite material selected for publication to conform with journalism standards. The deadline for material is close of business Wednesday the week prior to publication. Your comments are always welcome. The Seabee Courier office is in Building 60, Room 250. The mailing address is 4902 Marvin Shields Blvd., Code 15, Gulfport, MS 39501. Phone: 228 871-3662, Fax: 228 871-2389. Email: seabeecourier@navy.mil. Appearance leaves a lasting impression FLTCM(SW/AW) Jackie DiRosa Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Did you ever sit beside someone who smelled badly? It didn't have to be a strong odor, just enough that it made you notice. Think about how you reacted to that person. Did you feel that person was ready for the day? Did you feel he or she needed some help? How much respect did you have for that person? More than likely, you thought less of that person because cleanliness was a simple matter for you. Now think about your uniform appearance. Does it really matter? The truth is it does. Whether you're working with seniors or subordinates, people notice a squared-away Sailor. And whether they say something or not, it affects the way they will treat you. All of those catchy phrases, "Perception is reality", and "First impressions are lasting impressions", those phrases persist simply because they contain universal truths. People will make assumptions about your character, performance and values based on your appearance. Those first perceptions will last regardless of who you are and what you do. A sloppy uniform reflects a person who may be sloppy in job performance, watchstanding and many other areas. When I see someone in a sloppy uniform or someone with a blatant disregard for the regulations it raises many questions in my mind....if sloppy in uniform are they sloppy in their job, watch standing, etc. If they fail to pay attention to the simple details of the uniform regs do they fail to pay attention to other critical details of their job making them a vulnerable target? Uniform regulations spell out exactly what is necessary to maintain a sharp appearance and meet standards. There is no guesswork involved. This applies to wearing the prescribed uniform as well as the optional items, such as backpacks. Bright orange, purple, green – these are all the colors of backpacks you should NOT be carrying while in uniform. Navy blue OR black are the only two colors authorized according to the Uniform Regulations. Failing to take care of those small details that make up a sharp appear- ance brings a person's entire character into question. A sharp uniform creates a positive impression. Those who wear a sharp uniform carry themselves differently...with pride and confidence. We are all responsible for enforcing the standards and holding each other accountable for their appearance. Often, Sailors can turn themselves around just by having a good mentor who sets them straight. If you are a mentor, make sure your Sailors understand the importance of taking pride in their uniform. Set the bar high. Their success or failure in this basic area will affect their entire outlook on the Navy. If you're in need of a mentor or role model, look around and find one that can challenge you to be your best. Squared-away Sailors decide daily that their career, self-respect and the respect of others depend upon how well they present themselves. Nobody wants to sit next to the smelly guy, or worse, be that person. Only you can choose your fate and either be viewed as a vulnerable target or a fortress. What will be the lasting impression you leave on people you meet? 3rd Annual Seabee Classic Golf Tournament Friday, January 19 - - - 8 a.m. & 2 p.m. Starts Windance Golf & Country Club/Benefits the 2007 Seabee Ball Fees (per person): 03 & above: $55, E7 thru 03: $50, E6& below: $40, DoD & civilian: $60. Retired military pay at retired rank. Two FREE E3 and below teams (4 players) per command. Entry fee includes: green fees, cart, practice balls, awards, prizes and lunch. Register early, spots are limited. Must pay by January 12! Contact Lt.j.g. Michael Dobling for more information at 228 871-2636 or email: Michael.dobling@navy.mil By Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service Servicemembers will receive an average 3.5 percent boost in their basic allowance for housing compensation benefit in 2007, Defense Department officials said Dec. 18. The planned BAH increase starting Jan. 1 works out to about $300 million more than what was paid in 2006, officials said. "The continued improvement in housing allowances represents our commitment to the preservation of a compensation and benefit structure which will provide members with a suitable and secure standard of living that will sustain a trained, experienced and ready force in the future," according to Cynthia Smith, a DoD spokeswoman. Officials said military housing allowances are computed according to three key criteria: median current market rent; average utilities, to include electricity, heat and water/sewer costs; and average renter's insurance. BAH rates also are based on dwelling type and number of bedrooms in a given area and then calculated for each pay grade, both with and without family members. For servicemembers with family members, average increases in the BAH are approximately $44 per month. For example, a typical 3rd Class Petty Officer/Corporal (E-4) will receive about $34 more in BAH than in 2006, while a See BAH page 23 Command Action Line Because of limited IG resources throughout the Southeast Region, all Fraud, Waste and Abuse hotline work will now be handled by the Region. To report Fraud, Waste and Abuse, contact the Region at: Toll Free 1-877-657-9851 Comm: (904) 542-4979 DSN 942-4979 FAX: (904) 542-5587 E-mail: CNRSE_HOTLINE@navy.mil New year means new prices for DoD galleys From BAH page 2 Senior Chief Petty Officer/Master Sergeant (E-8) will receive about $42 more than this year. The BAH rate system has built-in protections to ensure that an individual servicemember in a given location won't see his or her BAH rate decrease. This provision assures that members who have made long-term lease or contract commitments are not penalized if the area's housing costs decrease. Some areas' housing costs have remained relatively stable, while others continue to rise. Most of the costliest housing in the United States with the highest BAH rates are clustered on or near the East and West coasts, and the state of Hawaii. The Department of Defense has announced the following food service rates, effective 1 January 2007. The discount rate shall be charged to spouses and dependents of Enlisted Personnel in pay grades E-1 through E-4, members of an organized non-profit youth group. Officers, Enlisted and Federal Civilian personnel not receiving the meal portion of per diem or using temporary dining facilities are also entitled to the discount rate. The standard rate shall be charged to all members receiving the Basic allowance for subsistence. From BLOCK page 8 Discount Breakfast $1.65 From ADOPT page 16 with a variety of lights and ornaments. Every member on the Whidbey Island Detail gave something. Some gave money, others gave school supplies, and the rest gave either clothes or toys. The gleam in the children's eyes made an everlasting impression on these Seabee Santas in $4.20 Supper $4.30 $5.15 Holiday $5.15 $6.05 Night Snack $2.00 "I've got a small make-up set but this one is awesome," said Tabitha For a family that had so little, they had a lot of heart. A few pictures were taken and some stories were swapped. The family asked a lot of questions about the Seabees and specifically how their own families were dealing with them being away from home during the holidays. After a couple of hours, $3.65 Brunch $3.60 opened a card with $30 in it. A gift of fleece pajamas bearing images of the Care Bears, was also one of her favorites. Jimmy, the man of the house at the tender age of 11, was thrilled to get a chained wallet, a Tony Hawk game for his Game Boy and an assortment of school supplies. Tabitha, the oldest of the three, received some music CD's, several articles of clothing and make-up. $3.65 Dinner $3.15 hard hats. For a family that had thought that Christmas day was almost over, it was just beginning. SK2 Wright had made sure that Mom was taken care of as well. Although Stephanie had said that it was "more about the kids," she too was overwhelmed. The Fearless Seabees watched with joyful hearts as the kids opened the gifts. Lexi, the youngest girl, said "I am rich!" as she $2.00 Lunch $3.15 weapons," said BU1 Barry Moyar. "Everyone getting the opportunity to fire the weapons better prepares us for our future deployments." The Seabees found that unlike a regular FEX, when the daily activities stop for the exercise, carrying on as scheduled, while also having a FEX provided a challenge. The experience and knowledge gained from the newly laid blocks, increases the ability to succeed no matter what comes next for the battalion. Standard $2.35 goodbyes were said and a "Merry Christmas" was wished by all. It is uncertain who received the greatest blessing this day. For those who gave and for those who received, came the realization that as long as you have hope and an open heart, small miracles can happen. 17 CB PG 02-23 Uniform standards Military housing rates rise 3.5 percent overall January 11, 2007 14:09 Seabee Courier 1/10/2007 Seabee Courier 11Jan07exp.qxd