Elven heritage legacy 11
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Elven heritage legacy 11

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Dancing happens, teen drama occurs, and I solemnly swear that I am truly as crazy as I look for doing yet

Dancing happens, teen drama occurs, and I solemnly swear that I am truly as crazy as I look for doing yet

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    Elven heritage legacy 11 Elven heritage legacy 11 Presentation Transcript

    • Menu:~Roast Turkey with Gravy , boiledVegetables, and Mashed Potatoes~ Penne Pasta in Red Meat Saucewith Seamed Vegetables~ Cobb Salad with a Side ofHardboiled Eggs and Choice of Dressing
    • Meadow, Thanks for putting this scrapbook together and sharing it with the yearbook committee. This was an amazing night that deserved to be memorialized for all of us. ~ Calla Elkthorn PS: Congratulationson Prom Court! Youand Eric are anadorable couple.
    • “Say Cheese!” Click. Click. Anariel smiled nervously as the camera bulb flashed twice, Viridia takingan extra picture for luck. She couldn‟t quite believe that she was going to prom– and with an older boy at that. “Hurry up you two, you don‟t want to be late.”
    • “Aw man, stop blocking the path.” “Shut up Vasquez,” Aranel said, “We‟re taking pictures.” “Damnit, Aranel, your mouth is open. And Trevor, you don‟t have any lint,so stop trying to brush it off.” “Sorry, Shar,” Trevor said, unconsciously fiddling with his suit.
    • Click. “Damnit, Trevor!” Sharlene said, peering at the screen again. “Oh look, Ara‟s mouth‟s open again.” “Don‟t be silly, Maura: Ara‟s mouth is always open.” Aranel shot a look at the other two girls, who were standing at the end ofthe red carpet, heads bent over the camera. “I heard that. Now get in the picture, we‟re holding up the line.Hey, Vasquez! Be a man and take our picture!” Friends gave the unlucky Vasquez a shove to the front.
    • Click.
    • Once inside Lulu Lounge, the five of them broke off in opposite directions. “Hey guys,” said Maura, who had headed directly for the fountain, “Do youknow, I‟ve always wondered what would happen if you put something in afountain…” “Let‟s pretend that we don‟t know her,” Aranel said to Trevor. “Agreed.”
    • Meanwhile, their arrival had attracted attention from other prom-goers.Amy St Julien waltzed up to them with a fake smile plastered on her lips. “Hello, Sharlene.” “Hello, Amy. That‟s…” Sharlene was clearly hunting for somethingunremarkable to say, “quite a dress.” “It is, isn‟t it? Mother wanted the dressmaker to have the seam higher, ofcourse, but the designer agreed with me that fashion shouldn‟t be constrainedby the morals of the past.” Aranel turned and walked quickly away from the conversation before shecracked up laughing.
    • And she nearly ran into trouble coming the other way. She wasn‟t sure ifshe imagined the slight twitch of Nymea‟s lip as she past, but she knew thather own smile froze for a minute. There were only a few months until graduation, and then she‟d never haveto deal with any of these petty people again. Surely she could manage thatlong? She‟d avoid Nymea and Amy during prom, and everything would bedrama-free. She would resist the urge to grab Nymea by the collar and tell herwhat a bitch she was to blackmail her own brother, and the urge to tell Amythat her “sophisticated” accent sounded like a duck blowing it‟s nose. It should be relatively easy. * * *
    • It should be easy, right? Anariel smiled nervously at her date, and tried to actlike she knew all about prom. She hadn‟t realized that it would be almost allupperclassmen at the dance, instead of people that she already knew. Not for the first time that night, she missed her friends. Actually, she missedLydia, but Lydia was at home, having a movie marathon with her brother andkid sister, and probably making kettle corn. Ana could taste the salt and sugar at the corners of her mouth as she thoughtabout it. Maybe that was just the lipstick she‟d convinced her mother to let herwear.
    • “So? How do you like the decorations?” she asked, hoping to start a decentconversation. Where were the jokes and banter now? Why couldn‟t she thinkof something wittier to say? Jacob shrugged, “It seems like they didn‟t do much to this place. It alwayslooks like this, you know.” Anariel didn‟t know, since she didn‟t make a habit of going to fancydowntown clubs. Actually, she didn‟t know how Jacob could have known,because if LuLu lounge hadn‟t been reserved for the night, he would have beencarded at the door. The lounge didn‟t exactly cater to teenagers.
    • “Hello, Jacob.” Ana and her date turned around at the sound of a not-so-amused voice bythe door, and Ana just had the time to take in a very elegant lookingblonde, clearly an upperclassman, and a boy who was all white smiles anddark good looks. The blonde‟s gaze passed over Ana and kept travelling.
    • “Sandra!” exclaimed Jacob, a strained smile leaping to his face, “And…Derick. I didn‟t think I‟d see you here. How are you?” “Oh, I‟ve been just fine, Jacob. And you know I would never miss oursenior prom.” “It‟s Darrin,” the other boy said, but Jacob and Sandra were busy staringeach other down, ignoring him and Ana. The atmosphere in the room wasstarting go get uncomfortable. “Oh, yeah… of course,” Jacob said. “This is my… um, date, Annie.”
    • Anariel grimaced. She hated it when people messed up her name. Anawasn‟t that hard of a name to say. “Hey, Jacob!” another girl walked into the room, smiled at Jacob, and thennoticed Sandra staring at her. “Oh, hi, Sandra,” she said without enthusiasm. “Jules,” Sandra replied, “I haven‟t seen you in ages.” The redhead turned to Jacob. “Don‟t tell me you‟re back with her,” shesaid. “Jules, this is Annie. Sandra‟s here with Dereck.” “Darrin.”
    • “Ana,” Anariel corrected, shaking the other girl‟s hand while Sandraattached herself to Jacob‟s neck with extra enthusiasm. “Jules. Here, I‟ll show you the snacks table,” replied the oldergirl, watching the antics going on behind Ana‟s back with a grimace, “You‟reprobably going to need some.” * * *
    • “So,” said Arcadia uncomfortably, as they all stood around on the darkeneddance floor, waiting for prom to really get underway, “Did you hear? One ofthe seniors just put soap in the fountain. The clean up committee is reallymad.” She ended her sentence with an extra large smile, despite the fact thatAchenar had been with her when she‟d heard that news, as had everybody else. Achenar smiled back, though. “Good thing we‟re not cleaning up, then.” “Yeah,” Arcadia replied with a laugh, “That‟s going to be messy.”
    • “So, um, I heard they‟re going to be playing Pink Flamingos later,” Arcadiasaid, “You know the song, „Dance in the Rain?‟ I like that one.” Calla, who was on student government and had reviewed the songs list, cutin. “Nope, the trustees voted it down. Apparently the line „dance naked in themoonlight‟ was too risqué for a school dance.” “Seriously?” Achenar laughed. “How‟d you get „Crazy for you,‟ past the moralguardians then?”
    • “Because they were told that the third verse was, and I quote:„Lovely true blue,‟ instead of the obvious rhyme.” Calla replied, only ahint of a smile breaking through her completely straight face. Achenar laughed, “I can‟t believe that you squeaked that past.” Calla shrugged. “It wasn‟t me, it was Tessa. That girl can lie likeyou wouldn‟t believe, and the adults just eat it up like she‟s thesweetest thing. Of course, usually she looks like an angel bycomparison, since she‟s standing next to Melody Tinker.”
    • “Ha ha, you‟re right, Calla,” said Arcadia. When Calla left to talk to Vince, shespoke up again. “So, um, Achenar, you think maybe we could stop by the snacktable or something?” When Achenar didn‟t react, she waved a hand in the air.“Achenar? Um, Achenar, are you... hungry… for anything?” “Huh?” there was a moment of disappointed silence as Achenar focused hisattention once more. “I… never mind, I‟m not really hungry.” “No, if you want to…” Achenar fumbled. Behind him, Calla and Vince weretalking, and he couldn‟t hear anything but the word college. “Just something to do, really,” said Arcadia.
    • “Excuse me? Sim State is not the „soft option‟ and neither is majoring inEducation!” Conversations around Calla and Vince died as they screeched to suddenhalts and crashed. “I believe,” said Vince, “that you may have misunderstood -” “Oh, I understood.” Calla turned on her heel and stalked off towards the back hallway without abackwards glance, effectively stranding Vince in the middle of a small circle ofspectators.
    • No one had much to say after that. “I guess I… er, I should go see if she‟s okay,” Achenar said lamely toArcadia. “Yeah, I guess… good idea,” Arcadia replied, waving her hands about,“Just… if you need help or something…” “Thanks,” Achenar said, before heading off as well.
    • “Hey Calla?” “What are you doing here, Achenar? This is the hallway to a girls’bathroom.” She sounded angry to him, but she turned around anyway.
    • “Just wanted to know if you‟re… you know.” Achenar rubbed the back ofhis itchy suit collar quickly, then, deciding that humor was the bestroute, adopted an incredibly fake “mafia henchman” accent. “You want I should whack „im, boss?” Despite herself, Calla giggled. “Thank you, but that‟s not necessary.” “Whatever the boss lady says.”
    • “He‟s… well, he‟s irritating, but it‟s not really…” “Ah. I‟ve heard that about him. He‟s not really that tall.” Calla poked Achenar in the ribs. “I meant, Vince, he‟s just… well, Idon‟t think he thinks before he speaks at all. He takes other people‟sdreams and he dismisses them out of hand.” “Somebody‟s always telling me that that‟s just what boys do.” “Yeah, well… at least you‟ve never laughed at me for wanting to bea teacher. Or anything else that‟s actually important.”
    • “There‟s nothing funny about it,” Achenar said. “And, for what it‟s worth, Ithink…” Calla looked at him expectantly. “Well, it‟s a good dream to have,” hefinished, lamely. “Plus, Vince really is extremely short.” Calla smiled again, but it was more of a twitch than anything else. “Youshould go on out and see about Arcadia,” she told him, “They‟re going to startplaying the dance music soon.” “Yeah. I should, I bet she wants to dance or something,” Achenar repliedabsently. “What about you?” “‟Enar, I have it taken care of.”
    • “Are you going to admit to enjoying prom now?” Maura asked Aranel. “What?” “I said, are you going to admit that prom isn‟t that bad?” Maura holleredback at Aranel. “Maura, I can‟t hear you over the music!” “Now you‟re just messing with me – oh, Look!” “What?”
    • “For Pete‟s sake!” Maura took Aranel by the shoulder and spun her aroundto point, “Rean! He‟s totally hitting on Trevor!” “Oh crap.” “Oh crap? What are you thinking of, Aranel? We‟ve only been certain thatwould happen since forever -” “Maura. That‟s Trustee St. Julien headed their way.” “Trustee..?” “Amy‟s grandfather.” It took Maura a moment to assimilate that information. “What are we goingto do, Aranel?” she asked.
    • “… Aranel?”
    • “Young man, I would very deeply hope that what I just saw wasn‟t what Ithink it was,” Makoto St. Julien said as he approached. “And what was that, sir?” Rean asked, surprised at just how reckless hefelt. “Dude. He‟s a trustee,” Trevor muttered behind him, “you‟re just gettingus in trouble. Cut it out.” Nymea was close enough to hear the conversation, but it was Amy‟slaughter that was ringing in her ears. There was nothing about this night thatcould get any worse. She was being completely humiliated.
    • “Of all the appalling, degenerate behavior…” “Mr. Makoto, I was here with them, they were only dancing -” “Exactly! How dare they, in public, make a mockery of this schoolwith their perversions -” “Mr. Makoto!” “Silence, Christine!” “Excuse me, sir, but when did it become any of your business who Idance with?”
    • “SORRY, HONEY, BUT I CAN‟T EVEN HEAR YOU!”“IT‟S URGENT, I HAVE A -”
    • “Of all the insolent -” “Mr. Makoto, as a member of the PTA I am perfectly capable ofchaperoning these boys -” “You will both have to leave this establishment -” “Oh my god, my life is over,” Nymea moaned into her hands, “I am soembarassed!” “Eh, serves your fag brother right,” said Amy, who was checking her teeth. “And both of your parents will be informed -”
    • “Would Trustee St. Julien step up to the stage?” The sudden silence now that the music was off was deafening. Heads turned all over the dance floor. She could see that, over by the edgeof the dance floor, all heads were turned her way. “Trustee St. Julien? If you would step up to the stage for a briefannouncement…” She could see him headed forward now. “Thank you, Mr.Trustee,” Aranel continued, thrilled with her own daring. She turned to thecrowd as he put on his blandest smile.
    • Now, many of you know Trustee St Julien,” she said, “He has long been arespected member of the school board, instrumental in many of its importantdecisions, and he has long attended school events. He likes to think of himselfas a moral guardian for us,” here she paused. It didn‟t seem like he was gettingit yet. “Trustee St Julien came to our prom tonight, as he does every year, to be apart of an old school tradition: the Junior and Senior prom.
    • “Now, prom is traditionally a time of celebration,” Aranel continued. Shehad no idea what she was going to say next, but the trustee was standing nextto her, smiling at the crowd that had started to gather around the microphone,and basking in the attention. That was going to have to change, soon. “Wegather on this one night of the year, not to party our brains out, but torecognize a transition, the act of leaving our childhood and our dependence onthe guidance of our elders behind us. We celebrate both the energy andoptimism of youth, and the freedom of our approaching adulthood: thefreedom to make our own decisions, to change the world for the better.”
    • “Trustee St Julien, who takes a very active hand in guiding the fate of ourschool,” Aranel continued, “Is a man of many opinions, which he has noqualms about sharing. He has been a part of Riverblossom Hills Academy formany decades, and he would like to think of himself as our moral guardian.” Was it possible that he didn‟t get it yet? She risked a sidelong glance, butthe old fool was still smiling benignly, as if he hadn‟t just been cagistating astudent. He probably thought he was being praised for his actions. Well. That would make her job just that much easier.
    • “As a proud alumnus of our school,” she continued, “and as a respectedmember of the community, Trustee St. Julien has a moral responsibility touphold: that of responsibility, of integrity, and most of all of tolerance.” She was having some trouble keeping a straight face, but she met herclassmate‟s eyes, hoping that they, at least, would understand. “Trustee St. Julian has stuck with our school through many changingtimes,” she said, quietly, “He embodies a small and no doubt importantsegment of our past. But times have changed: we have changed. We are thefuture, and he is the past.”
    • “A few moments ago, I witnessed an event that made me realize that, as anadult, it will be my moral duty, in the name of integrity and tolerance, tooppose the societal norms of that past. I witnessed our trustee single out acouple on this dance floor and tell them that, although they are both membersin good standing of our school, they are not entitled to the same freedoms andprivileges as the rest of us. And for what reason? Because their identity offendshis old-fashioned sensibilities: because Trustee St. Julian does not wish toaccept students whose sexual orientation he opposes.”
    • “Trustee St. Julien,” she pronounced loudly, trying to forge ahead quicklywhile the old man was still stunned, “wishes for this school to remain in theoppressive, unenlightened, and morally wrong grips of a past notion ofnormality. He wishes to deny us the right to participate in our own schoolevent if we do not conform to his expectations!” There was a boo from somewhere in the crowd – it took only a few secondsbefore the rest followed suit, and there was cacophony for a minute. Cries of“Unfair!” and “You suck!” were tossed at the old man, who stormed off. “Turn off the microphone!” he yelled at the DJ. “Turn it off.”
    • “He‟s going to cut my mic,” Aranel all but shouted, “Because he can‟t takethe truth.” There were more boos in the audience, “That‟s what he does when peopledisagree with him: he tries to silence them, tries to make them go away. I‟veonly got a bit of time left, so I won‟t waste it on him, but if you disagree withthe trustee‟s idea of who we should be and what kind of prom we should have,follow me on out this door. He can‟t stop us from leaving, and he can‟t denywhat we know. We‟re nearly adults now – we know right from wrong – wedeserve a voice and we‟re going to make it -”
    • A grating whine of feedback cut her off, mid-sentence. She glanced at theDJ booth and saw that Trustee St. Julien had taken matters into his own handsand yanked the microphone cord out. “Young lady,” he began.
    • Aranel stepped forward and walked out.
    • * * *
    • When she woke, Lydia wasn‟t sure what had snapped her out of her dreamsuntil she heard the rattle of pea-gravel on the window across theroom, sounding like a brief fistful of impatient rain. She got up with a glance at the clock – she‟d only been asleep for about anhour – and crossed the room, flinging open the window and sticking her headout.
    • Down below, Anariel waved cheerfully at her with a gloved hand full ofgravel. “But see: what light breaks through yonder window?” she misquoted, grinningup in the darkness.
    • Lydia sighed. “I don‟t know whether to be amused or horrified that eventhough there‟s a memorization test on Romeo and Juliet on Monday, you stillmanaged to mangle that line,” she admitted to her friend. “Just let me in, Lyds.” “Fine, just one sec.”
    • Lydia crept downstairs and unbolted the apartment door to find her best friendstanding on the porch, wearing a giant grin. Instantly, Ana threw her arms aroundher neck and hugged her.
    • “So… prom went well?” she hazarded, steering Ana inside the door andbolting it again. “Actually, surprisingly well, considering,” Ana replied thoughtfully.“Upstairs?” “Yeah, upstairs,” Lydia replied. “I‟m surprised Mom and Makir aren‟tawake.”
    • The two of them trooped up the stairs after Ana slipped off her high heels.Lydia wondered for a moment at the absolute silence of the house around themas their bare feet padded across the carpet. “Actually, can I use your phone?” Ana asked once they made it upstairs, “Iought to call my mom.” “Sure.”
    • Ana dialed, and Lydia sat down on the couch, listening. “Hi Mom.Yeah, we left prom early. No, I‟m at Lydia‟s house. The other kids were goingto a party and I didn‟t want to go so I headed there. Yeah. No, I told Achenar Iwas leaving. Aranel was kind of busy. Actually…” she looked at Lydia andmouthed „can I stay?‟ Lydia nodded. “Yup, I‟m staying overnight. Mom. It‟s not like I haven‟t shared Lydia‟stoothbrush before. We‟ll figure it out. Love you too.”
    • She hung up the phone and flopped down next to Lydia. “Funny,” Lydia said, “Wasn‟t this the plan before you got asked to prom?” Ana leaned back and looked at her with a smile. “I never said that gettingasked to prom didn‟t mean I wouldn‟t spend part of the weekend with you.”
    • Lydia snorted. “All right, spill. Why did you really leave prom? I mean, I knowyou don‟t like parties too much, but you seemed all right with the idea of going toprom.” With an upperclassman, her brain supplied as extra information.
    • Ana shrugged. “Prom sort of stopped early,” she said, “You know mysister‟s friend Rean? Well, he finally started dancing with this other guy andone of the school trustees tried to throw them out of the dance for it.” “That‟s stupid.”
    • “Yeah. So Aranel got up on stage and gave this long speech about how that wasn‟tfair. And we all left prom and headed out to the parks. Pretty much everybody else wasgoing to the after prom parties, but I didn‟t get invited and I didn‟t want to tag alongafter Ara or Achenar, so I called up a taxi and came here. By the way, if I promise topay you back, can you cover bus fare in the morning? Taxis cost more than I thought.”
    • Lydia rolled her eyes. “So? What did you do?” “Movie marathon. I watched The Princess Bride and Indiana Jones withOrion and Delphina, then Orion and I watched Spider Man when Delphina hadgone to bed.” “Which Indiana Jones?” “Raiders of the Lost Arc – not Temple of Lame Special Effects orKingdom of the Alien conspiracies.”
    • “Hey, it could have been… that other one. The one with Indy‟s father.” “Exactly. You still haven‟t told me how prom went, really.” Ana shrugged. “Well, turns out my date spent most of the night staring atsome other girl – his ex, I guess – so I kind of just hung around. Danced a bitwith the other‟s girl‟s date after it became painfully clear that we were bothbeing ignored, hung out with a pretty cool older girl, named Jules, who wasnice. She gave me some pointers on college applications, but other than thatand her being really pretty, we didn‟t have a whole lot to talk about.”
    • “Good thing you came here to fill up your quota of intelligentconversation, then,” Lydia replied.
    • * * *
    • Author’s note Yeah, sorry about this one taking so long, guys. Part of it was massive crowd scenes (setting up LuLu Lounge for prom wasan epic undertaking) and the fact that I can‟t play my game at all when it‟sover 90 degrees (which it was, very often, this summer) for fear of frying mygraphics card. I need my graphics card. The other bit of it was either the insanity that went with work, or the not-good things that were happening, including medical stuff. I‟m all goodnow, with physical therapy and whatnot, and didn‟t need surgery after all. That and I went on vacation, then returned to school, which rounds out myusual laundry list of excuses.
    • That said, this was epic amounts of fun to shoot. Well, play andshoot, once I got things set up, which required making over LuluLounge and getting more than 20 teen sims on the lot. … Not for the faint of heart, guys. Yes. This is Elirand‟s prom date being hit on while he stands therewith his hands in his pockets. He spent the whole night unable to gethis relationship score with her above 30.
    • … Aaaand this is Elirand‟s prom date being hit on by Ana‟s prom date (who needsto forget it, seriously, because Jules O‟Mackey and Sandra Roth are both at this party,)while she heart-farts Achenar. Yeeeeah. Hard luck, dude. Oh, public service announcement: Makoto St. Julien is not really an evil sim. Infact, I couldn‟t keep him from initiating townie social interactions all over the lot orrandomly finger-gunning the teens. But when I saw that he shared a last name withAmy, I decided he was perfect for this role.
    • Anyone else notice that Maxis got teenagers dancing pretty much exactlyright? Yeah, I swear this is the last slide, folks. Stay tuned for Graduand part2, and then college. Because it has taken me four years to get Aranel tocollege, you don‟t even know… As a side note, if I am ever crazy enough to do this again I will need tofind more teen male formal clothes. And that is really all, folks.