HDI 2007 P&S Survey

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Copyright ©2007 HDI
All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.

ISBN: 1-57125-018-2

HDI
102 South Tejon Street, Suite 1200 Colorado Springs, CO 80903 U.S.A. U.S. and Canada: 800.248.5667
www.ThinkHDI.com

HDI is a registered trademark of ThinkService, Inc. ITIL is a registered trademark, and a registered community trademark of the Office of Government Commerce, and is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. IT Infrastructure Library is a registered trademark

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HDI 2007 P&S Survey

  1. 1. Who the Data Represent: Demographics ............................................................................................................... 15 Industry Number of support centers within the support organization Location of support organization Location of the support center’s customer base Type of support provided by the support center Number of customers supported by the support center Support centers that provide multi-lingual support Size of the support center’s staff What support centers are called this year Incident Management ........................................................................................................................................ 23 Incident Management Summary Percent of support centers who receive incidents through and measured through each channel Average fully burdened cost for the support center, per incident resolved by each channel (U.S. data only) Why the number of incidents is increasing for some support centers Why the number of incidents is decreasing for some support centers Percent of day support staff spends on incident management Percent of incidents resolved at each point Incident tracking systems currently being used Handling incidents when the support center is not staffed Incident backlog management Reopened incident rate Support Tools .................................................................................................................................................. 35 Support Tools Summary Which tools are being used? An effective support organization must have this tool Are the features of the Service Management tool being fully utilized? Are the features of the Asset Management/CMDB tool being fully utilized? Are the features of the Knowledge Management tool being fully utilized? The Knowledge Management tools used by support centers are… Self-help tools: Percent of support centers that provide them Is ITIL alignment an important aspect of choosing support tools? Process, Procedures, and Strategies .................................................................................................................. 43 Process, Procedures, and Strategies Summary Practices or frameworks: Percent of support centers that are using, planning to use, or have used them What percent of support centers have implemented ITIL processes? What percent of support centers are maintaining Service Level Agreements? How are support centers charging for their support services? What percent of support centers are calculating the cost of downtime to the business? To what do support centers align their objectives? Outsourcing......................................................................................................................................... 50 Which functions are being outsourced or being considered for outsourcing? Why aren’t support organizations outsourcing more? What are outsourcing expectations for the next year? TABLE OF4
  2. 2. Performance Metrics ...................................................................................................................................... 53 Performance Metrics Summary Do support organizations report their performance metrics? How often are support center metrics reported to stakeholders? Phone Metrics ..................................................................................................................................... 5 5 What is the average speed to answer (speak to a human) on the telephone? What is the target average speed to answer (speak to a human) on the telephone? What is the abandonment rate for the telephone? What is the target abandonment rate for the telephone? How is First Call Resolution being calculated? What percentage of incidents taken over the phone are resolved on the first call? E-mail Metrics ..................................................................................................................................... 0 What is the average time for a human to respond to a customer about an incident reported through e-mail? What is the target time for a human to respond to a customer about an incident reported through e-mail? Of the incidents received through and resolved via e-mail, how many e-mail exchanges does it take to solve one incident on average? Approximately what percent of incidents reported through e-mail are converted to telephone support before being resolved? Customer Satisfaction........................................................................................................................ 2 How is customer satisfaction being measured? What is the customer satisfaction rating? Support Center Staff: Training, Certification, and Satisfaction ................................................................................. 5 Support Center Staff Summary Training ................................................................................................................................................ 9 In what areas do support staffs receive formal training? Days per year spent on formal training of each member on the support staff What methods are being used to train new hires to the support center? Primary training focus for new hires Time to proficiency for a new hire to the support center cation......................................................................................................................................... 1 Certifi The industry’s position on certification Which certifications are valued as important for a support staff to have? Certified employees are described by those have who them on their staff to be… Employee Satisfaction........................................................................................................................ 2 How often is support staff satisfaction being measured? What is the support staff satisfaction rating? Support staff attrition rates Average tenure for each level in the support center HDI Annual Salary Survey ................................................................................................................................. 5 Salary Survey Summary Country Analysis Salary Frequency Distribution U.S.A. Regional Analysis Salary by Education Are employees or potential hires that are certified paid more than those who are not certified? Factors determining salary increases Are employees financially rewarded/paid for... Who receives bonuses? On what are the bonuses based? What most motivates people to do their job? What is anticipated/planned for the next year?
  3. 3. 07 Copyright ©2007 HDI® • All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. ISBN: 1-57125-018-2 HDI ® 102 South Tejon Street, Suite 1200 Colorado Springs, CO 80903 U.S.A. U.S. and Canada: 800.248.5667 www.ThinkHDI.com HDI assumes no liability for error or omission. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the consent of HDI, with the exception of trade publications reporting on the data. In such cases, credit must be given to HDI. Executive Summary Ron Muns, Founder and CEO, HDI® Peggy Libbey, President and COO, HDI® Statistical Analysis Jenny Rains, Research Analyst , HDI® Executive Editor Rich Hand, Executive Director of Membership, HDI® Robert Last, Content Manager, HDI® HDI® is a registered trademark of ThinkService, Inc. ITIL® is a registered trademark, and a registered community Editor trademark of the Office of Government Commerce, and Julie Neider is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. IT Infrastructure Library ® is a registered trademark of the Office of Government Commerce. Art Director Scott Hanson
  4. 4. Introduction About the Report HDI publishes its annual Practices and Salary Survey in order to supply the industry with a valuable and convenient tool which can be utilized for several purposes. The Practices and Salary Survey provides an overall look at the state of the industry; it also offers an inside look at the practices used by support centers throughout the industry. This allows support center managers to validate existing practices, and discover new ideas for improving the current operations in their support center. In addition, the survey provides a set of data to which support centers can benchmark against. With the idea of benchmarking in mind, this year’s results are reported not only for the industry as a whole, but key metrics are also broken down by the most requested demographics. With the 2007 Practices and Salary Survey, HDI has begun its goal of aligning the survey with the Support Center Certification (SCC) Standards. This effort will continue in future publications of the Practices and Salary Survey. Throughout the report you will see an icon next to the graphs that align with the SCC Standards. Changes and additions have been made to the survey in order to align it with the SCC Standards, as well as to keep the terminology and desired information current for the industry. Additionally, membership feedback has helped shape the survey into a valuable tool for support center managers. Below is a table that helps to clarify some of the terminology used in the survey and report. Company Support OrganizationSupport Support SupportCenter 1 Center 2 Center 3
  5. 5. INTRO cont. Navigating the Report Industry Number of Surveys The most commonly requested industry metrics have Included in Results been organized into an easy-to-read matrix located Banking 73 at the front of this book. The Executive Summary is Education 99 followed by the Demographics section that illustrates the make-up of those who participated in this year’s Government 99 survey. The body of the report follows with Incident Healthcare 118 Management, Support Tools, Process, Procedures, Insurance 56 and Strategies, Performance Metics, and Support Manufacturing 61 Staff sections. Each of these sections begins with Outsourcer 61 the breakdown of results by demographics and a brief summary of the overall results for the section. Type of Support The report concludes with the annual HDI Salary Blended 423 Survey results. External 111 Internal 471 Practices Survey results have been broken down Number of Customers in three ways. First, results are reported for seven Less than 2000 342 industries which had 50 or more responses. All 2000-9,999 318 levels of government (federal, state, local, and other) have been combined to create one comparison 10,000 + 345 group. Second, results are reported by the type of support the center provides, internal, external, or a blend of the two. Last, results have been analyzed by size of support center. This breakdown is based on the number of customers the center supports (both internal and external). The number of survey responses included in the results for each category can be seen in the table to the right. Appreciation HDI acknowledges the time that it takes to participate in this survey, and would like to thank all of this year’s respondents. It is because of the large response in 2007, that analysis was possible for the select demographic groups. 2007 provided the largest complete set of data for both the Practices and Salary Surveys. Thank you.8
  6. 6. HDI’s Most Requested Metrics for 200 Support Center Industry Statistics 9Metric 200 Survey ResultsAverage Speed to Answer Phone Percent of Support Centers 10 seconds or less 37.8% 30 seconds or less 71.5%Abandonment Rate 5% or less 65.1%Response Time for E-mail Less than 15 minutes 11.4% 15 minutes to 1 hour 34.8% 1 to 4 hours 35.0% 4 to 8 hours 10.5% More than 8 hours 8.2%Average Number of E-mail Exchanges to Resolvean Incident (1 exchange = 1 receive + 1 send) 1 28% 2 44% 3 21% 4 5% 5 1% More than 5 1%Percent of Incidents Resolved at Each Point Percent of Incidents Self-help 3% Level 1 56% Level 2 17% Level 3 8% Desktop Support 14% Other 2%First Call Resolution Rate (telephone) 64.8%Target FCR 70.9%Fully Burdened Cost per Incident (U.S. median) Chat $10 E-mail $15 Phone $17 Walkup $20
  7. 7. The 2007 Practices and Salary Survey was This year’s survey results show that telephone and completed online by over 1,000 support center e-mail continue to be the most widely used channels managers or other appropriate positions. Results for reporting incidents. However, with benefits such are based on responses provided by 1,005 people as lower median costs, and the ability to free up representing support centers in five countries. phone lines for urgent incidents, less used channels The United States makes up the majority of such as auto-logging, chat, and self-help might begin responses with 84%. Canada is represented to see more utilization by the industry in the future. by 8%, and 8% of responses are from other countries including Brazil, India, and Australia. While not unexpected, it is disturbing to see so This year’s survey results include support centers many support centers taking advantage of the from over thirty industries with various staff and various channels for receiving incidents, but not customer demographics. measuring them. For instance, 90% of support centers receive incidents through e-mail. However, Incident Management only 67% of support centers measure this channel’s In keeping with previous years, the majority of effectiveness. When support centers do not measure support centers are seeing an increase in the the channels they are using, they are ignoring an number of incidents they receive. Similar to 2006 opportunity to evaluate valuable information about this increase is being attributed to changes in the problems and concerns of their customers. infrastructure and/or products. This trend suggests that managers must constantly be embracing and Support Tools preparing for changes within their support centers. With 81% of support centers currently using remote In addition, support center staffs are spending monitoring/support tools, and 68% of them having no approximately three-fourths of their day on incident plans to make changes to these tools, this is one of management. the most stable set of tools used in the industry. While 88% of support centers are currently using Incident Also consistent with 2006, level 1 support remains Management software, 30% of them are planning to the dominant level at which incidents are being replace/update it. Also, 25% of support centers are resolved. Historically, the higher an incident planning to add self-help tools to their toolbox. progresses upwards in an organization, the more expensive it becomes. Therefore, on the Responses related to the use of online chat, positive side, it is encouraging to see the majority self-help tools, and e-mail management tools of incidents being resolved at the lowest level. are lower than expected. While these tools are well However, also seen with these results, is the use of known and technologically stable, their use lags self-help not gaining as much “market penetration” behind the traditional support tools. This might as anticipated. Its success in resolving incidents suggest that the underpinning policies, processes, and remains low. procedures that go into using these tools in the best manner are still weak and need to be strengthened. There seems to be some differences in tool utilization related to support center demographics. For instance, far fewer small support centers (which serve less than 2,000 customers) are using Automated Call Distributors than large support 10
  8. 8. 11centers (serving 10,000+ customers). It appears that used frameworks come from opposite ends some tools have a greater return on investment for of the Atlantic. SOX is a peculiarly American support centers predominantly due to their needs. creation and ITIL is a uniquely British These needs are often determined by the support invention. Also interesting is the rank of center’s demographics such as the number of the HDI Support Center Certification customers, type of support, and type of industry. program (third place) and the appearance of Knowledge-Centered In choosing support center service management tools, Support (KCSSM ) in the list of it is common to encounter the perception that tools frameworks and best practices. are “aligned with ITIL®.” While ITIL as a framework Different programs have value has no recognized process to “align” itself with any to different businesses and software package, 31% of respondents, in both 2006 organizations. This can be and 2007, believe it is a necessity to choose tools that seen in the industry are in alignment with ITIL. breakdown at the beginning of The tendency of support centers to purchase complex the Processes, tools and then fail to utilize them is consistent with Proceedures, 2006 findings. This year, 66% of respondents have and Strategies purchased, but have not fully implemented, if at section.all, the capabilities of their Service Management tools. Asset Management/CMDB tools have been fully implemented by about 20% of the centers that have purchased them. While only 24% fully utilize their purchased Knowledge Management tool. Also noteworthy, is that a quarter of the support centers have no Knowledge Management tool at all.Processes, Procedures, and StrategiesIn regards to practices and frameworks used in 2007, the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) is clearly seen by the 42.5% of respondents that are currently using this process. Interestingly, after SOX, the next most used framework is the increasingly well-known Information Technology Infrastructure Library(ITIL); the two most Ron Muns HDI , Founder and CEO ®
  9. 9. Performance Metrics Performance metrics are being produced by 74% of support centers, and reported to some level of stakeholders. A closer look at this data showed that more large support centers (10,000+ customers) are reporting metrics at 85%, in contrast to the 59% of small support centers (less than 2000 customers) producing and reporting their metrics. About half of all support centers are sharing their metrics with external stakeholders such as customers and support partners. This is up from previous years. Overall, the telephone metrics have remained stable for the last few years. For instance, in both 2006 and 2007, 71.5% of support centers have average speed to answer (ASA) times of 30 seconds or less. This is roughly 1 to 6 rings. Since most adults become annoyed at 5+ rings, this is a positive industry metric. So, while no noticeable improvements have An increase in the use of ITIL® has been seen across been made by the industry for this channel, some of the board. Incident Management is the most widely the results are still encouraging. adopted of the ITIL frameworks, followed by Change Management and Problem Management. A large It does appear that e-mail processes might be percentage of support centers are using some improving slightly. About 93% of incidents reported processes other than ITIL, and disturbingly, through e-mail are being resolved in 3 exchanges or many support centers have no formal less. This is up from 88% in 2006. E-mail does tend processes at all. to remain a “delayed response tool.” About 35% of support centers are responding The prevalence of Service Level Management (SLM) to customers about incidents is evident in this year’s results. The use of SLM is a reported through e-mail practice that is encouraged and one that benefits within 15 minutes to an support operations and customers alike. Of concern, hour. Another 35% are however, is that 23% of survey respondents are not responding in 1 to 4 using Service Level Agreements, Operational Level hours. These results Agreements, nor Underpinning Contracts. are neither good nor bad; they are simply In 2007, support centers appear to be outsourcing an indication less than in the previous year. Last year’s survey that customer reported 57% of support centers contracting with expectations outsourcers for IT functions. This year, 58% of need to be support centers report that they do not outsource, managed in nor do they plan to outsource. The most reported regards to reasons for not outsourcing more are control of service, service quality, customer acceptance, and then cost. Of those who are outsourcing, hardware support and repair continues to be the most contracted service.12 Peggy Libbey HDI , President and COO ®
  10. 10. submitting incidents via this channel. E-mail is Results are also reported by level of education. a good tool for some incidents, but may not be As expected, and consistent with 2006, higher 13appropriate for all incidents. education results in higher salary.Traditionally, the two most common approaches While employees with higher levels of education are used to measure customer satisfaction are to paid more, those with industry certifications are not measure 100% of all incidents closed and a random necessarily paid more. While more companies find sample of closed incidents. The results of the survey these employees to be valuable in comparison to validate this tradition. While customer satisfaction 2006, 5% fewer companies are paying them more.ratings might seem high (76% reporting 4 to 5 ratings on a 1 to 5 scale), they do align with the 30% of companies reported that they do not results found in the HDI Customer Satisfaction offer bonuses to any of their employees. This has Benchmarking Study. decreased from 2006 (38%). Of the organizations that pay bonuses, about 35% base their bonuses Support Staff solely on the company meeting its objectives rather A central theme seen in 2007 is the rising emphasis than on individual performance.put on customer service. Support centers are focusing as much on training staff on customer Respondents were asked to choose the five most service skills as they are on technical skills and important factors in determining salary increases product knowledge. This is especially true for for each level of employee. For all levels, salary support centers with larger numbers of customers. increases are being determined by 1-Quality of work, 2-Meeting job metrics/standards and 3-CustomerIn addition, the certifications that hold value in the service skills. Experience in support is an important industry are a mix of both technical and customer factor for call screeners, level 1, and level 2 service certifications. Support centers are hiring and employees, while leadership skills are anproviding support staffs with a blended set of skills. important factor for both levels of managers. In addition to customer satisfaction, awareness of employee satisfaction seems to be increasing. While, Anticipations/plans for support centers next year almost half of the support centers did not measure include increased hiring for 45%, and layoffs foremployee satisfaction in 2006, this is down to 30% only 5%. One of the concerns around this has in 2007. carried over from last year’s results; it is anticipated that there will be a lack of qualified workers to fill HDI Annual Salary Survey these positions.This year’s Salary Survey was based on 785 U.S. responses and 80 Canadian responses. The data are reported separately for each country. Overall, salaries are only slightly higher than 2006, and there are no substantial changes in any one category.U.S. results are reported for East, Central,and West regions of the country as well. TheWestern region is paying the highest ofthe three regions, followed byEast, then Central.
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  12. 12. Who the Data Represent:Demographics 15 The 2007 Practices and Salary Survey was completed online by over 1,000 support center managers or other appropriate positions. Results are based on responses provided by 1,005 people representing support centers in over five countries. The United States makes up the majority of responses with 84%. Canada is represented by 8%, and 8% of responses are from other countries including Brazil, India, and Australia. This year’s survey results include support centers from over thirty industries with various staff and customer demographics.
  13. 13. Who the Data Represents: Demographics Companys Industry Industry Accounting .4% Advertising/Marketing .5% Aerospace .3% Automotive .9% Chemical/Biotechnical .3% Computers/Hardware 1.2% Computers/Software 8.6% Construction/Development .7% Consulting 2.4% Consumer/Products 1.1% Distribution .9% Education 10.0% Entertainment 1.0% Financial Services/Banking 7.4% Financial Services/Securities 1.7% Food and Beverage .7% Government/Local 3.1% Government/State 2.4% Government/Federal 3.8% Government/Other .8% Healthcare/Pharmaceutical 11.9% Insurance 5.6% Legal 2.6% Manufacturing (non-computer) 6.1% New Media/Publishing 1.4% Nonprofit or Association 1.6% Outsourced Services Provider 6.2% Retail 4.2% Telecom 1.7% Transportation 1.0% Travel 1.7% Utilities/Energy 3.0% Other 5.2% Percent1 Dem
  14. 14. Number of Support Centers Within the Support Organization Larger organizations have better representation in 2007 than in 2006. 1 13% 1 13% 1 2 9% 2 9% 3 3 46% 46% 4% 4% 4 4 6% 6% 5 5 9% 9% 6 to 10 6 to 10 12% 11 or More 12% 11 or More © Photographer: Masta4650 Agency: Dreamstime.commographics
  15. 15. Location of Support Center(s) Within the Organization Onsite Only 30% 27% Single Site/Single Country (Not Onsite) Multiple Site/Single Country 9% Multi-country 34% Location of Support Center’s Customer Base 19% Single Site/Single Country 32% Multiple Site/Single Country Multi-country 49% Type of Support Provided by the Support Center Internal Only 42% 47% External Only Blended 11%18
  16. 16. Number of Customers Supported by the Support Center (Includes Both Internal and External) 5% 10% Less than 100 19 7% 100–499 11% 500–999 1,000–1,499 23% 8% 1,500–1,999 2,000–5,000 4% 5,001–10,000 11% 10,001–50,000 22% Over 50,000 27% Yes Support Centers that Provide Multi-lingual Support No 73% 9% 5 or less 7% 19% 6–10 11–15 4% 16–20 4% Size of the Support Center’s Staff 21–30 9% 31–40 24% 41–50 51–100 9% More than 100 15%
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  18. 18. 21 What Support Centers Are Called this YearWhat Support Centers are Called This Year Help Desk 37.4% Service Desk 18.5% Technical Support 9.2% IT/IS Support 7.9% Customer Support Center 6.9% Support Center 5.7% Support Services 4.0% Customer Service Center 3.4% Service Support Center 3.3% Call Center 2.6% End-user Support 1.3% In 2006, “Help Desk” and “Service Desk” were the top two selections followed by “IT/IS Support,” then “Technical Support.”
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  20. 20. IncidentManagement 23
  21. 21. Percent of Support Centers that Receive Incidents through the Following Channels Industry Auto-logging Chat E-mail Fax Phone Self-help Walkup Web Request Banking 35.6% 12.3% 84.9% 16.4% 97.3% 35.6% 52.1% 43.8% Education 25.3% 15.2% 99.0% 25.3% 100.0% 36.4% 85.9% 63.6% Government 18.2% 5.1% 94.9% 25.3% 98.0% 25.3% 63.6% 36.4% Healthcare 35.6% 13.6% 86.4% 27.1% 100.0% 37.3% 48.3% 51.7% Insurance 30.4% 8.9% 91.1% 14.3% 98.2% 26.8% 57.1% 44.6% Manufacturing 29.5% 19.7% 98.4% 21.3% 98.4% 32.8% 77.0% 57.4% Outsourcer 47.5% 18.0% 88.5% 24.6% 98.4% 31.1% 31.1% 60.7% Type of Support Auto-logging Chat E-mail Fax Phone Self-help Walkup Web Request Blended 33.3% 18.0% 91.5% 24.1% 98.1% 35.2% 58.6% 49.2% External 27.9% 17.1% 89.2% 35.1% 99.1% 35.1% 9.9% 51.4% Internal 25.9% 8.9% 89.0% 16.3% 98.9% 26.8% 63.9% 45.4% Number of Customers Auto-logging Chat E-mail Fax Phone Self-help Walkup Web Request Less than 2,000 27.6% 13.9% 92.0% 15.4% 97.9% 25.5% 37.4% 42.4% 2000-9,999 30.5% 9.7% 92.8% 22.3% 99.1% 28.6% 37.7% 47.2% 10,000 + 29.6% 16.8% 85.8% 28.4% 99.1% 39.1% 42.6% 47.2% Percent of Incidents Resolved at Each Point Industry Self-help Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Desktop Other Banking 3.3% 60.7% 16.6% 5.9% 11.4% 2.2% Education 3.5% 51.9% 13.0% 7.5% 23.2% 1.0% Government 2.3% 50.1% 18.5% 7.5% 20.0% 2.0% Healthcare 3.9% 56.4% 14.6% 8.1% 14.8% 2.3% Insurance 1.5% 62.6% 16.2% 6.8% 9.0% 4.0% Manufacturing 3.0% 54.4% 17.4% 7.8% 13.6% 2.8% Outsourcer 1.9% 54.9% 20.3% 6.6% 14.4% 1.9% Type of Support Self-help Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Desktop Other Blended 3.6% 53.8% 17.3% 8.2% 14.6% 2.6% External 5.2% 62.1% 18.4% 6.9% 4.0% 3.4% Internal 2.4% 55.7% 16.5% 7.2% 16.7% 1.6% Number of Customers Self-help Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Desktop Other Less than 2000 3.8% 49.4% 18.8% 8.5% 17.0% 2.5% 2000-9,999 2.4% 55.4% 17.1% 7.5% 15.9% 1.7% 10,000 + 3.3% 62.0% 15.1% 6.9% 10.5% 2.3%24
  22. 22. Incident Management SummaryIn keeping with previous years, the majority of support centers are seeing an increase in the number of 25incidents they receive. Similar to 2006 this increase is being attributed to changes in infrastructure and/orproducts. This trend suggests that managers must constantly be embracing and preparing for changeswithin their support centers. In addition, support center staffs are spending approximately three-fourths oftheir day on incident management. Also consistent with 2006, level 1 support remains the dominant levelat which incidents are being resolved.Historically, the higher an incident progresses upwards in an organization, the more expensive it becomes.Therefore, on the positive side, it is encouraging to see the majority of incidents being resolved at the lowest level.However, also seen with these results, is the use of self-help not gaining as much “market penetration” as anticipated.Its success in resolving incidents remains low.This year’s survey results show that telephone and e-mail continue to be the most widely used channels for reportingincidents. However, with benefits such as lower median costs, and the ability to free up phone lines for urgentincidents less used channels such as auto-logging, chat, and self-help might begin to see more utilization by theindustry in the future.While not unexpected, it is disturbing to see so many support centers taking advantage of the various channels forreceiving incidents, but not measuring them. For instance, 90% of support centers receive incidents through e-mail.However, only 67% of support centers measure this channel’s effectiveness. When support centers do not measurethe channels they are using, they are ignoring an opportunity to evaluate valuable information about the problemsand concerns of their customers. Percent of Day Support Staff Percent of Support Centers Percent of Support Centers Spends on Incident Management Providing 24 Hour Incident Support Collecting Backlog Data Industry Industry Industry Banking 77.5% Banking 41.1% Banking 35.6% Education 70.9% Education 3.0% Education 30.3% Government 71.2% Government 25.3% Government 33.3% Healthcare 77.8% Healthcare 46.6% Healthcare 37.3% Insurance 75.0% Insurance 25.0% Insurance 32.1% Manufacturing 72.1% Manufacturing 31.1% Manufacturing 32.8% Outsourcer 69.4% Outsourcer 70.5% Outsourcer 49.2% Type of Support Type of Support Type of Support Blended 70.9% Blended 38.1% Blended 38.5% External 73.2% External 39.6% External 42.3% Internal 74.1% Internal 29.5% Internal 32.1% Number of Customers Number of Customers Number of Customers Less than 2000 67.5% Less than 2000 20.8% Less than 2000 31.8% 2000-9,999 76.3% 2000-9,999 28.6% 2000-9,999 35.5% 10,000 + 74.3% 10,000 + 52.5% 10,000 + 40.9%
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  24. 24. Percent of Support Centers that Receive Incidents through, and Measure Incidents Receivedthrough the Following Channels 2 29.3% Autologging 23.5% 13.6% Chat 8.4% 90.0% E-mail 66.6% 22.1% Fax 12.8% Phone 98.6% Receive Incidents 85.7% Measure 31.2% Self-help 19.8% 55.7% Walkup 34.6% 47.7% Web Request 39.1% 8.4% Other 6.9% Average Fully Burdened Cost for the Support Center, Per Incident Resolved by Each Channel (U.S. Data Only) Autologging $14.30 $10.00 Chat $19.92 $10.00 E-mail $21.84 $15.00 Fax $15.67 $11.50 Mean Phone $24.37 Median $17.00 Self-help $12.44 $8.00 Walkup $25.98 $20.00 Web Request $20.08 $15.00 Cost per Incident Canada Mean Median E-mail $ 22.81 $ 15.00 Phone $ 26.83 $ 20.00
  25. 25. Why the Number of Incidents Is Increasing for Some Support Centers 15% say their number of incidents have not increased. Of those who have seen an increase, 44% believe it is due to changes such as upgrades, conversions, and installations. 3% 3% 6% Infrastructure or Product Changes: Upgrades, Conversions, Installations More Customers Expanded Service Offerings by the Support Center 21% 44% Increased Awareness of the Support Organization Customer Competency Product Quality 24% Why the Number of Incidents Are Decreasing for Some Support Centers Of those who have seen a decrease, 40% believe it is because systems are more stable. 1% 8% Systems Are More Stable 11% Problem Management Within Organization 40% Increased Product Quality 12% Self-help Tools Customer Competency Fewer Customers 12% Reduced Scope of Services 17%28
  26. 26. 17% 29 Percent of Day Support Staff Spends on Incident Management 27% Incident Management Other Activities (Projects, Meetings, Training, etc.) 73%The HDI Practices and Salary Surveyis very easy to understand, and helps usunderstand what other organizations aredoing in order to make sound businessdecisions. The survey is instrumental forour ongoing performance improvementand metrics program.Amado CruzDivision Director,Miami-Dade County Enterprise Technology Services
  27. 27. Percent of Incidents Resolved at Each Point 2% 3% 14% Self-help 8% Level 1 Level 2 56% Level 3 17% Desktop Support Other BMC® 25.7% FrontRange Solutions TM 13.7% HP ® 10.3% Homegrown 9.8% Numara SoftwareTM 6.1% CATM 5.5% Oracle® 3.3% NortelTM 2.3% IBM® 2.1%30 GWI 2.0% SymantecTM/AltirisTM 1.4% Axios Systems TM 0.4% Other 17.8%
  28. 28. Incident Tracking Systems Currently Being UsedThere were 352 “Other” responses originally. Almost half of these fell into one of the below categories and are reported there. 179 responses are still included in “Other.” Responses add up to more than 100% due to support centers using more than one system. 31 BMC® 25.7% FrontRange Solutions TM 13.7% HP ® 10.3% Homegrown 9.8% Numara Software TM 6.1% CA TM 5.5% Oracle ® 3.3% NortelTM 2.3% IBM® 2.1% GWI 2.0% SymantecTM/AltirisTM 1.4% Axios SystemsTM 0.4% Other 17.8% None 1.6% Percent of Support Centers Using the SystemHandling Incidents When the Support Center Is not Staffed (select all that apply)Of the 661 support centers that this applies to, the majority is using voice-mail, answering machines, or answering services to take after-hours calls. And of those, half are also using e-mail, and a quarter of them are forwarding to staff cell/pager as well. Many of the 8.3% of “Other” responses fell into the categories of outsourcing after-hours incidents, having staff on-call, and logging incidents until regular business hours. Voicemail, Answering 54.5% Machine, or Service Forward to Staff Cell, 36.8% Pager, etc. E-mail 34.2% Forward to 12.3% Another Department We Have No 8.8% Off-hour Procedures Other 8.3%
  29. 29. Incident Backlog Management While almost half of the support centers are collecting backlog data, only a quarter are updating and using the information. Collecting Backlog Data 47.4% Routinely Updating It 26.0% Comparing It to Their Goals 24.3% Use Their Backlog Data for 25.0% Planning and Scheduling Resources Percent of Support Centers 8% 5% Based on the Number of Incidents and Their Age 32 Based on the Number of Incidents and Hours of Work Possible26% Other
  30. 30. When it comes to calculating backlog, of those who do collect it, 62% calculate based on number of incidents and their age, 26% calculate it based on the number of incidents and hours of possible work, and 5% calculate it in some other manner. 8% did not respond to this part of the question. 33 8% 5% Based on the Number of Incidents and Their Age Based on the Number of Incidents and Hours of Work Possible 26% Other 62% No ResponseReopened incident rate Reopened Incident Rate26% of centers do not measure their reopenedincident rate. Of the ones that do, the breakdown 26% of centers do not measure their reopened incident rate. Of the ones that do, ofthe breakdown of the rates is as follows. the rates is as follows. 4% 1% 13% 2% 29% 3% 4% 17% 5% 6–10% 5% 19% More Than 10% 13%
  31. 31. 34
  32. 32. SupportTools 35
  33. 33. Percent of Support Centers that Are NOT Using, nor Planning to Use the Following Tools Automated Customer Incident Knowledge Remote Online Call Satisfaction Management Management Monitoring/ Chat Distributor Tool Software Software Support Tools Industry Banking 26.0% 23.3% 5.5% 12.3% 50.7% 5.5% Education 39.4% 20.2% 5.1% 22.2% 55.6% 15.2% Government 32.3% 28.3% 9.1% 19.2% 65.7% 11.1% Healthcare 23.7% 15.3% 7.6% 11.0% 55.1% 5.9% Insurance 23.2% 12.5% 5.4% 21.4% 57.1% 5.4% Manufacturing 39.3% 21.3% 8.2% 13.1% 54.1% 6.6% Outsourcer 9.8% 13.1% 4.9% 13.1% 45.9% 6.6% Type of Support Blended 30.0% 19.9% 6.4% 14.9% 49.6% 8.5% External 26.1% 14.4% 8.1% 12.6% 52.3% 16.2% Internal 30.1% 19.7% 7.0% 17.2% 61.1% 8.9% Number of Customers Less than 2000 50.4% 27.9% 10.1% 23.1% 62.0% 10.1% 2000-9,999 23.9% 17.6% 5.7% 14.5% 57.2% 8.5% 10,000 + 13.6% 11.9% 4.6% 9.0% 47.2% 9.9%3
  34. 34. Asset Configuration E-mailSelf-help Management Management Management Tools Tool Tool Tool 3 23.3% 15.1% 28.8% 27.4% 16.2% 27.3% 38.4% 31.3% 29.3% 19.2% 29.3% 36.4% 23.7% 19.5% 28.8% 27.1% 28.6% 25.0% 30.4% 30.4% 24.6% 16.4% 34.4% 36.1% 31.1% 27.9% 27.9% 29.5% 23.6% 24.3% 30.0% 27.9% 20.7% 40.5% 41.4% 33.3% 29.7% 20.0% 35.9% 38.4% 32.0% 24.0% 37.7% 33.8% 26.7% 22.6% 36.5% 33.6% 19.4% 25.5% 28.1% 32.8% Support Tools Summary With 81% of support centers currently using remote monitoring/support tools, and 68% of them having no plans to make changes to these tools, this is one of the most stable set of tools used in the industry. While 88% of support centers are currently using Incident Management software, 30% of them are planning to replace/update it. Also, 25% of support centers are planning to add self-help tools to their toolbox. Responses related to the use of online chat, self-help tools, and e-mail management tools are lower than expected. While these tools are well known and technologically stable, their use lags behind the traditional support tools. This might suggest that the underpinning policies, processes, and procedures that go into using these tools in the best manner are still weak and need to be strengthened. As seen on the previous page, there seems to be some differences in tool utilization related to support center demographics. For instance, far fewer small support centers (which serve less than 2,000 customers) are using Automated Call Distributors than large support centers (serving 10,000+ customers). It appears that some tools have a greater return on investment for support centers predominantly due to their needs. These needs are often determined by the support center’s demographics such as the number of customers, type of support, and type of industry. In choosing support center service management tools, it is common to encounter the perception that tools are “aligned with ITIL®.” While ITIL as a framework has no recognized process to “align” itself with any software package, 31% of respondents, in both 2006 and 2007, believe it is a necessity to choose tools that are in alignment with ITIL. The tendency of support centers to purchase complex tools and then fail to utilize them is consistent with 2006 findings. This year, 66% of respondents have purchased, but have not fully implemented, if at all, the capabilities of their Service Management tools. Asset Management/CMDB tools have been fully implemented by about 20% of the centers that have purchased them. While only 24% fully utilize their purchased Knowledge Management tool. Also noteworthy, is that a quarter of the support centers have no Knowledge Management tool at all.
  35. 35. Automated Call Self-help Tools Support Tools Configuration Management Management Management Management Management Satisfaction Online Chat Monitoring/ Distributor Knowledge Customer Software Software Incident Remote Which Tools Are E-mail Asset Tool Tool Tool Tool Being Used? We Use this and Have No 51.6% 48.4% 57.4% 36.2% 21.0% 68.0% 29.8% 36.6% 26.5% 39.8% Plans to Replace/Update We Use but Are Planning 12.4% 14.4% 30.3% 23.1% 4.5% 13.3% 17.1% 17.4% 12.0% 10.6% to Replace/Update We Do Not Use but 4.1% 16.1% 3.7% 23.0% 16.9% 7.1% 25.2% 15.7% 19.8% 9.5% Are Planning to Add It We Do Not Use 29.7% 19.2% 6.9% 15.7% 55.3% 9.6% 26.2% 24.1% 34.0% 33.4% I Dont Know 2.1% 1.9% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.1% 1.7% 6.1% 7.6% 6.6% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% An Effective Support Organization Must Have this Tool Incident Management 97.3% Customer Satisfaction Tool 93.0% Knowledge Management 92.2% Remote Monitoring/Support 91.3% Self-help Tools 81.0% Asset Management Tool 80.7% Automated Call Distributor 79.2% Configuration Management 74.5% E-mail Management Tool 73% Online Chat 39.8% Percent Who Agree38 Sup
  36. 36. Are the Features of the Service Management Tool Being Fully Utilized? 14% 39 4% 20% Have Implemented to the Limits of the Tool Use Some Features but Have Not Implemented to the Capability of the Tool Have Bought a Tool but Have Not Yet Implemented No Service Management Tool 62% Are the Features of the Asset Management/CMDB Tool Being Fully Utilized? 13% Have Implemented to the Limits of the Tool 33% Use Some Features but Have Not Implemented to the Capability of the Tool Have Bought a Tool but Have Not Yet Implemented 41% 13% No Asset Management/CMDB Tool Are the Features of the Knowledge Management Tool Being Fully Utilized? 18% Have Implemented to the Limits of the Tool 26% Use Some Features but Have Not Implemented to the Capability of the Tool Have Bought a Tool but Have Not Yet Implemented 15% 42% No Knowledge Management Toolpport Tools
  37. 37. Knowledge Management Tools Used by Support Centers Are... 24% 23% Stand Alone Integrated with the Incident Management System 12% Included in the Service Management Suite Do Not Have a Knowledge Management Tool 41% Self-help Tools: Percent of Support Centers that Provide Them FAQs 48.7% Access to Incident Problem 42.2% Access to Knowledge 38.0% Documentation Library 33.5% Password Reset 32 32.1% Downloads 24.2% Self-diagnostic 5.7% Self-healing 4.8% We Do Not Have Any Available 27.5% Is ITIL ® Alignment an Important Aspect of Choosing Support Tools? 15% 31% It Is a Necessity Very Important but Not Necessity 27% Somewhat Important Not Important at All 27%40
  38. 38. I find the HDI Practicesand Salary Survey extremelyvaluable when preparing myfiscal budget for next year. 41It is a great reference pointfor me to use. I have beenusing this survey for yearsnow and enjoy reviewingthe yearly findings. W.T. (Bill) Auvil, Jr. Vice President, Global Customer Services, FrontRange Solutions © Photographer: Ben Goode | Agency: Dreamstime.com
  39. 39. 42
  40. 40. Process, Procedures,and Strategies 43
  41. 41. Percent of Support Centers Currently Using or Implementing These Practices/Frameworks (select all that apply) Capability HDI Support Maturity Model COBIT® Center ISO® 9000 ISO® IEC 20000 IT Governance CMMI® Certification Industry Banking 16.4% 13.7% 24.7% 13.7% 11.0% 34.2% Education 1.0% 2.0% 22.2% 1.0% 0.0% 12.1% Government 9.1% 3.0% 21.2% 10.1% 7.1% 15.2% Healthcare 10.2% 5.9% 25.4% 10.2% 5.1% 23.7% Insurance 10.7% 16.1% 33.9% 10.7% 5.4% 39.3% Manufacturing 6.6% 14.8% 26.2% 32.8% 11.5% 27.9% Outsourcer 19.7% 9.8% 29.5% 31.1% 14.8% 27.9% Type of Support Blended 12.1% 8.5% 27.0% 17.0% 10.2% 24.8% External 9.9% 5.4% 25.2% 20.7% 8.1% 12.6% Internal 5.5% 8.3% 23.6% 10.6% 3.8% 22.7% Number of Customers Less than 2000 7.7% 7.1% 22.0% 13.1% 5.6% 14.5% 2000-9,999 6.9% 7.2% 26.4% 11.6% 4.4% 22.6% 10,000 + 11.6% 9.9% 27.2% 18.6% 10.7% 30.4% Percent of Support Centers Maintaining Service Level Agreements (select all that apply) Underpinning Single SLAs Multiple SLAs OLAs None Contracts Industry Banking 39.7% 45.2% 37.0% 12.3% 17.8% Education 43.4% 36.4% 29.3% 5.1% 30.3% Government 34.3% 45.5% 38.4% 8.1% 26.3% Healthcare 35.6% 52.5% 33.9% 10.2% 24.6% Insurance 32.1% 51.8% 41.1% 10.7% 21.4% Manufacturing 39.3% 27.9% 23.0% 4.9% 36.1% Outsourcer 34.4% 23.0% 44.3% 29.5% 8.2% Type of Support Blended 33.8% 55.6% 37.6% 11.6% 19.6% External 43.2% 56.8% 27.9% 19.8% 14.4% Internal 35.7% 38.6% 31.0% 5.9% 28.9% Number of Customers Less than 2000 36.5% 39.2% 23.4% 6.8% 30.3% 2000-9,999 33.6% 45.9% 31.8% 8.2% 24.2% 10,000 + 37.1% 58.6% 44.9% 14.5% 15.4%44
  42. 42. Knowledge- Process Sarbanes Total QualityITIL® ITSM Centered Maturity Six Sigma ® Oxley Management SupportSM Framework 4545.2% 23.3% 31.5% 6.8% 64.4% 32.9% 11.0%14.1% 7.1% 13.1% 0.0% 13.1% 2.0% 1.0%39.4% 24.2% 15.2% 3.0% 10.1% 6.1% 13.1%32.2% 20.3% 27.1% 5.1% 31.4% 22.9% 13.6%46.4% 23.2% 26.8% 5.4% 57.1% 21.4% 14.3%26.2% 19.7% 18.0% 4.9% 62.3% 32.8% 21.3%54.1% 27.9% 23.0% 8.2% 54.1% 24.6% 21.3%34.5% 20.1% 27.2% 6.6% 40.9% 21.3% 16.3%23.4% 10.8% 32.4% 9.0% 43.2% 23.4% 17.1%32.7% 18.0% 16.6% 4.2% 43.7% 13.6% 10.4%26.4% 14.5% 18.4% 5.0% 29.4% 9.2% 10.7%29.9% 15.7% 18.9% 3.1% 46.9% 17.3% 11.9%41.2% 24.1% 30.4% 9.0% 51.9% 27.2% 18.0% Process, Procedures, and Strategies Summary In regards to practices and frameworks used in 2007, the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) is clearly seen by the 42.5% of respondents that are currently using this framework. Interestingly, after SOX, the next most used framework is the increasingly well-known Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL®); the two most used frameworks come from opposite ends of the Atlantic. SOX is a peculiarly American creation and ITIL is a uniquely British invention. Also interesting is the rank of the HDI Support Center Certification program (third place) and the appearance of Knowledge-centered Support (KCS) in the list of frameworks and best practices. Different programs have value to different businesses and organizations. This can be seen in the industry breakdown on the previous page. An increase in the use of ITIL has been seen across the board. Incident Management is the most widely adopted of the ITIL framework, followed by Change Management and Problem Management. A large percentage of support centers are using some processes other than ITIL, and disturbingly, many support centers have no formal processes at all. The prevalence of Service Level Management (SLM) is evident in this year’s results. The use of SLM is a practice that is encouraged and one that benefits support operations and customers alike. Of concern, however, is that 23% of survey respondents are not using Service Level Agreements, Operational Level Agreements, or Underpinning Contracts. In 2007, support centers appear to be outsourcing less than in the previous year. Last year’s survey reported 57% of support centers contracting with outsourcers for IT functions. This year, 58% of support centers report that they do not outsource, nor do they plan to outsource. The most reported reasons for not outsourcing more are control of service, service quality, customer acceptance, and then cost. Of those who are outsourcing, hardware support and repair continues to be the most contracted service.
  43. 43. Practices and Frameworks: Percent of Support Centers that Are Using, Planning to Use, or Have Used Them Capability Maturity Model CMMI® 8.8% 7.2% 6.5% 77.5% COBIT® 8.1% 6.3% 5.8% 79.8% HDI Support Center Certification 25.2% 19.8% 11.1% 43.8% ISO® 9000 14.4% 3.2% 8.0% 74.3% ISO® IEC 20000 7.0% 6.6% 4.6% 81.8% IT Governance 22.5% 7.7% 6.6% 63.2% ITIL® 32.4% 27.0% 4.3% 36.2% ITSM 18.1% 15.9% 4.1% 61.8% Knowledge-Centered SupportSM 22.8% 26.6% 6.3% 44.3% Process Maturity Framework 5.8% 7.8% 4.3% 82.1% Sarbanes Oxley 42.5% 6.0% 3.3% 48.2% Six Sigma® 17.9% 6.9% 7.7% 67.5% Total Quality Management 13.6% 7.7% 11.3% 67.3% Currently Using or Implementing Planning to Implement Have Used in the Past Have Not Used and Do Not Plan to Use4
  44. 44. What Percent of Support Centers Have Implemented ITIL ® Processes? 100% 90% 21.6% 15.1% 4 22.8% 28.7% 80% 35.2% 42.5% 37.3% 34.7% 45.6% 45.6% 70% 60% 44.4% 44.5% 44.9% 50% 42.9% 54.6% 40% 45.2% 43.4% 51.1% 40.0% 40.8% 30% 20% 40.5% 33.9% 32.3% 10% 21.9% 20.1% 14.4% 13.6% 14.1% 16.7% 11.5% 0% No Formal ProcessAn increase of ITIL processes was seen in every catagory since 2006. Have a Process But It Is Not Based On the ITIL Process Follow the ITIL Process Percent Who Followed the ITIL Process in 200 Availability Management 10.5% Capacity Management 9.9% Change Management 25.2% Configuration Management 14.6% Continuity Management 10.9% Incident Management 33.6% Problem Management 25.1% Release Management 13.0% Security Management 11.6% © Photographer: Edyta Pawlowska Agency: Dreamstime.com”
  45. 45. © Photographer: Pedro Nogueira Agency: Dreamstime.com The HDI Practices and Salary Survey is an excellent reference for your IT support organization. We use some of the information from it as reference points in our monthly service delivery metrics reports to show how we are doing in comparison to industry practices. It is a great reference for benchmarking. Marc A. Heppding Director, IS Customer Services/Help Desk, MedStar Health Information Services48

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