Love The One You're With - AOS Dad's Club

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Presentation on generational conflict in the workplace and parenting for the future economy

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  • I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on the frivolous youth of today, for they are reckless beyond words. When I was young, we were taught to be discreet, respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly disrespectful and impatient.“ – Socrates, 400 BC
  • Why are we even talking about this? – because there are not enough 35-45 year olds to replace your currently retiring employees and leaders.
  • I think there are three key reasons why the Millennials think so differently from you Both the Boomers and the Millennials average about 4.5 million people per year. So in 1965, the Boomers were competing with 4.5 million potential workers in an economy of 71 million jobs, while the same number of Millennials are today competing in an economy twice that size. So the boomers had to stay late, had to show up on Saturday, had to have "face time" with the boss so that you would get noticed; there were four or five other people that could or would take that job if you didn't keep it. Today's 25 year old millienial simply does not face that same type of challenge. On top of that, for the first time in history, the youngest generation in the workforce possesses technological skill dominance over the older, supervising generations. So, not only is the competition much less to get a job for these workers, they may often have better skills than the people who have just hired and are supervising them.  
  • Finally, the third explanation is that Millennials have also radically redefined expectations of their value and ability to contribute to success. And what's more, their parents encouraged them to think that. Parents demanded explanations from teachers for bad test scores and grades. Parents complained to the principal when Billy got in the honor society and Johnny did not. Parents borrowed the money for questionable degrees instead of more vocationally oriented courses of study. Parents sent them to summer camps every year instead of asking them to get a job. As the old 1980s PSA about drugs used to say “I learned it by watching you.”
  • One of the first things I noticed with my young brokers was that they stopped by my office nearly every day; particularly if I hadn’t walked down to see them in the past couple of days. For a long time, I got really irritated by the constant interruption. But then I read Nicole Lipkin’s book “Y In the Workplace” – that’s when I realized these visits were a positive sign. Lipkin addresses the idea that helicopter parenting has stunted the independence and decision-making ability of millennials. But she says “the benefit of helicopter parenting is that parents and children share a close relationship with a continuance of support and encouragement throughout the lifespan to keep Generation Y motivated and positive.”  My key insight was that they are not coming to my office and asking repeated simple questions because they were confused or didn’t know what to do. They were coming, honestly, to make sure that I wasn’t upset with them about something, to make sure that things were OK, to make sure that I hadn’t withdrawn my parental concern and approval. Sigmund Freud described transference in the early 20th century – when a patient subconsciously endows their therapist with feelings about their parents. Dr. Lipkin bluntly establishes the relationship: I always have someone on my side no matter whatParental guidance offers wisdom that same-aged peers cannot giveBoss, I like you – you remind me of my mom/dadI will listen to you, Boss He remarks on a study wherein he talked to high school principals who recounted that if you wanted to punish a Gen-Xer, you told them, “If you keep this up, you’re going to go to the counselor!” Then they’d stop, outraged at the idea that they couldn’t take care of themselves. Millennials will be delighted to go to the counselor, because they think the counselor will make them happier and better adjusted.Now, I’m not suggesting you need to start packing a lunch for your 27 year old sales person. But those annoying questions and visits – you should recognize those as an opening – that your employee is reaching out to you. Take advantage of the opportunities they present to brainstorm with them to help them develop confidence in their abilities and autonomy. Also, take advantage of these times to reinforce the qualities – like leadership, independent thinking, maturity, emotional intelligence -- you need for success in your company and/or industry. Help them to create goals to achieve these objectives and provide them with regular feedback. Finally, use these sessions also to share your company’s values and objectives and how what your millennial employees does fits in to that. At the end of the day, you don’t want them to treat you either like a peer or a parent, you want to help them to develop a mature work relationship. It may sound like a lot of handholding, but it works. And it helps to build loyalty. Millennials typically do not have loyalty to companies, but they will develop strong personal loyalty. The young lady I hired in 2007, for example, has worked for me at three different companies. It works, and it will let you establish the kind of relationship with them where they will listen to you. A 27-year old attorney in Washington, D.C. said it best: “It's probably pretty parental in its roots, but knowing that someone cares about how you're doing makes you want to do better to impress them and make them proud.”
  • The second thing we did was to try and develop a path to success for these young workers. Most real estate companies have “training” programs for new agents that consist of making lots of phone calls and spending some time “apprenticing” under an experienced real estate broker. I think many of us went through those programs – I know I picked up enough coffee and dry cleaning to achieve expert proficiency in those skills. We looked at our hiring, and determined about 1 in 5 of our new hires made it, and we terminated or lost another 50% within the first year. This was after reviewing hundreds of resumes, multiple interviews with dozens of candidates, and testing each potential hire. Basically, we would throw these young workers to the wolves, hope their senior brokers would tell them something, occasionally plan meetings where we told them something we thought was important, and then were shocked when in three months, they had only set a few meetings.Dr. Lipkin talks about the challenges that Millennials face in lower-level positions: “This generation recognizes early on in the work experience that great work gets noticed. Since getting noticed is important and motivating to this generation, everything that they do must be great, and subsequently they have difficulty with the job duties of entry level positions.” I also came to understand that they were genuinely frustrated by what they perceived as their failures, and that they really wanted to show them the path to success, to invest the time in them to give them the “keys to the mint.” . A 27-year old attorney in Washington, D.C. said it best: “It's probably pretty parental in its roots, but knowing that someone cares about how you're doing makes you want to do better to impress them and make them proud.” 
  • We tracked the calls and meetings of our trainees and we found they typically fell below their targets. At first I thought it was a reporting issue, but we even installed a call counter and the totals still didn’t improve. We found that they were discouraged by poor results from a lack of training – they never knew what to say. I also believe – although they would not admit it – that they were afraid of calling people on the phone. The phone has fallen out of favor for those under 30. A recent survey showed that over 75% of them send more than 20 texts per day. The survey reports:Among all teens, the frequency of use of texting has now overtaken the frequency of every other common form of interaction with their friends. Fully two-thirds of teen texters say they are more likely to use their cell phones to text their friends than talk to them by cell phone.One millennial describes the phenomenon:"Of course I text people. Usually to tell them to call me. It sure beats having them answer the phone and saying I'll call you back, or leaving a message that then have to listen to, and then call me and maybe get me maybe not."It’s really hard to get a meeting by texting a prospect.
  • In their book The Psychology of Sales Call Reluctance, Shannon Goodson and George Dudley surveyed 11,000 sales people and found that 80% of new sales people failed because of sales call reluctance. Steve Kloyda describes the phenomenon:“We've all found ourselves on phone calls, lost in no man's land because we were not prepared. The client hears hesitation, discomfort, a shaky voice, and perhaps a less than smooth attempt to right the ship. If we string several of these calls together, our confidence can falter and our reluctance to make the next call deepens.”Goodson and Dudley also discovered that another 40% of experienced sales people reported episodes of sales call reluctance severe enough to potentially end their careers in sales. We tracked the calls and meetings of our trainees and we found they typically fell below their targets. At first I thought it was a reporting issue, but we even installed a call counter and the totals still didn’t improve. We found that they were discouraged by poor results from a lack of training – they never knew what to say. I also believe – although they would not admit it – that they were afraid of calling people on the phone.
  • More than anything, these workers need your leadership and guidance, and your recognition that they are on the path to success. And outside of time, setting up these kinds of programs is mostly free. Those lessons are applicable to any industry. Sales is the key challenge for this generation. A 2011 survey by CSO Insight showed that sales people only spend about 41% of their time selling.A little more than 41 percent is spent selling by phone or face-to-face. The survey also pointed to a very clear relationship between time spent with customers and sales reps making quota. For example, salespeople who spent 35 percent or less of their time selling by phone or face-to-face achieved quota only 55 percent of the time; however when salespeople spent more than 45 percent of their time selling, the chances of them making quota went up to 62 percent. More belly-to-belly selling time fattens salespeople’s wallets.
  • We measured calls, meetings, and revenue per transaction. Over the course of a year, we found our trainees were 6,000 calls short of their targets – only about 15 calls per week per associate short.
  • We were able to show that the short fall – 15 calls per week – based on call to meeting ratios, deal closing ratios and average commissions – resulted in $250,000 in lost opportunities.This is the kind of data we started integrating into our onboarding materials. Although this shortfall represented a small percentage of the company’s revenue, it should have represented about $20,000 per new agent – a significant amount for trainees who worked on straight commission.
  • Parenting for the future economyHere Come the Gen X ParentsIt’s More Fun to be a Pirate than Join the NavyFuture Success Lies in Curation of Information – understand valueTeach Entrepreneurship and FailureLearn communication skills (here it is again)The Future Isn’t Plastics – it’s Mrs. Robinson
  • Finally, the third explanation is that Millennials have also radically redefined expectations of their value and ability to contribute to success. And what's more, their parents encouraged them to think that. Parents demanded explanations from teachers for bad test scores and grades. Parents complained to the principal when Billy got in the honor society and Johnny did not. Parents borrowed the money for questionable degrees instead of more vocationally oriented courses of study. Parents sent them to summer camps every year instead of asking them to get a job. As the old 1980s PSA about drugs used to say “I learned it by watching you.”
  • Since 2007, the US has lost more than 1,045,000 “middle skill” or middle class jobs. Only 9 MSAs created net new middle class jobs over that time period, and 48% were in Houston, and 93% were in Texas.
  • There are 42 million freelancers in America today--a third of our workforce--and many have embraced an entirely new economic ecosystem. These workers are turning apartments into hotels, Priuses into cabs, and garages into craft manufacturing and distribution centers. Freelancers are increasingly micro-entrepreneurs, building small business and brands, seizing new opportunities to reach previously inaccessible customers and clients, and adding tremendous value to local communities and the nation’s economy along the way.Likewise, the sharing economy is no longer just a creative way for workers to supplement their sagging paychecks in a struggling labor market. TaskRabbit, Fiverr, Skillshare, and dozens of peer-to-peer platforms are now primary sources of income. A string of micro-gigs is becoming the new normal. Experts predict that the ranks of freelancers will swell to 40% of all workers in America by the end of this decadehttp://www.fastcoexist.com/3021147/its-time-for-the-sharing-economy-to-become-the-sharing-society
  • “We’re used to how the social web has disrupted media, but that same wave is moving through other industries, driven by startups like Airbnb, Coursera and Uber — and while regulators and entrenched industries are trying to fight it, the trend behind that wave is unstoppable.”Matthew Ingram, Airbnb, Coursera and Uber: The rise of the disruption economy, May 22, 2013, http://www.forbes.com/sites/jmaureenhenderson/2013/05/22/offices-hotels-and-shopping-malls-brace-for-millennial-makeovers/30% of internet traffic is streaming from Netflix.Ayn Rand was wrong. John Galt is not a super-rich venture capitalist who is in an undisclosed location with Dick Cheney – John Galt is a 28 year old with an iphone who’s getting a ride in someone’s Prius he found on Uber to an underground supper club in someone’s apartment in Washington DC; or a 24 year old who needs to learn accounting and is taking Intro to Financial Accounting from Wharton School of Business for free on coursera instead of at night school at UH while she also watches south park reruns on You tube.
  • “We’re used to how the social web has disrupted media, but that same wave is moving through other industries, driven by startups like Airbnb, Coursera and Uber — and while regulators and entrenched industries are trying to fight it, the trend behind that wave is unstoppable.”Matthew Ingram, Airbnb, Coursera and Uber: The rise of the disruption economy, May 22, 2013, http://www.forbes.com/sites/jmaureenhenderson/2013/05/22/offices-hotels-and-shopping-malls-brace-for-millennial-makeovers/
  • Lt Col Om Prakash, who trains fighter pilots for the Air Force, says:You should be glad if with your help the new Airman learns their job better than you, not discouraged. You should be proud if your student can one day fly feats beyond your skill, not envious. You should feel the greatest satisfaction if one day your subordinate can do your job better than you ever did, not disparaging. For this is the ultimate in achievement …. The next generation must be more than ready to fill our shoes; they must be ready to run faster in them. Thank you.
  • Love The One You're With - AOS Dad's Club

    1. 1. Managing Generational Conflict in the Workplace and Parenting for the Economy of the Future
    2. 2. www.scottdaviscre.com
    3. 3. "I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on the frivolous youth of today, for they are reckless beyond words. When I was young, we were taught to be discreet, respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly disrespectful and impatient.“ – Socrates, c. 400 BC Image credit: marzolino / 123RF Stock Photo
    4. 4. • • • • • • • • • • Pragmatic Cynical Value liberty, survival Children of Artist Children in Awakening Nomad • • • • • Principled, creative Ruthless, narcissistic Value vision, values Children of Hero Children in High • • • • • Open-minded, expert Sentimental Value due process Children of Nomad Children in Crisis Hero Prophet Rational, Competent Unreflective, bold Value community Children of Prophet Elder in Awakening Artist
    5. 5. • Gen X • GI • Millennials Nomad Prophet • Boomers Hero Artist • Silent • Homeland
    6. 6. Nomad Washington Hero Jefferson Artist T Roosevelt Image credit: paolag / 123RF Stock Photo Prophet Lincoln
    7. 7. GI (1901-1924) Gen X (1961-1980) Silent (1925-1942) Millennial (1981-2004) Baby Boom (1943-1960) Homeland (2005-)
    8. 8.  Thankful for Medicare and Social Security  Thankful they can help their Gen X children with their grandchildren  Thankful for Silver Sneakers class at the Y  Thankful their Boomer nephew won’t be bringing a tofu turkey this year  Listening to What a Wonderful World by Louis Armstrong  Watching It’s A Wonderful Life after the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade
    9. 9.  Thankful for family, but particularly that their children have finally moved out  Thankful that their son or daughter is finally coming home from Iraq or Afghanistan  Thankful that someone will be here that can download the Windows 8.1 update  Thankful for the FDA for approving Juvederm gel implants  Listening to Come Together by the Beatles  Watching The Big Chill after turkey dinner
    10. 10.  Thankful for what they have today, not tomorrow  Thankful they finally have a family and home, even though they don’t know how they’re going to care for parents and children at the same time  Thankful the stores are open so they can leave after turkey dinner  Thankful Dad went of town so they don’t have to do two separate turkey dinners  Listening to The Thanksgiving Song by Adam Sandler  Watching Planes, Trains and Automobiles
    11. 11.  Thankful for Apple, Netflix, Hulu and Snapchat  Thankful the parents left my room like it was in high school, because I’m moving back in the spring after I graduate from college  Thankful for mom and dad’s healthcare plan, because I’m on it  Thankful Mom got the gluten-free bread for dressing  Want to eat at 4 because they’re serving turkey at a homeless shelter that morning  Listening to Thankful by Kelly Clarkson  Binge watching Season 6 of Breaking Bad on Netflix
    12. 12. 24,000 23,000 22,000 21,000 20,000 19,000 18,000 17,000 Homeland 41 million 16,000 Under 5 to 9 5 years years Generation X 61 million Millennials 85 million 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years Series 1 Baby Boomers 81 million 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years Silent & GI 58 million 65 to 74 years 75 to 84 years 85 years and over
    13. 13. 4.5 M Millennials/year enter economy w/ 130M jobs 160,000 120,000 4.5 M Boomers/year enter economy w/ 50M jobs 80,000 40,000 0 F-48 F-52 F-56 F-60 F-64 F-68 F-72 F-76 F-80 F-84 F-88 Total Non-Farm Payroll, Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2013 F-92 F-96 F-00 F-04 F-08 F-12
    14. 14. Image credit: michaeljung / 123RF Stock Photo
    15. 15.  Protecting through involvement  Focus on outcome  Changing the world through their children  What’s best for the GROUP of children  Giving children what they need to be successful  Aspirational – you can do anything!  Everybody wins Adapted from Frank N. Magid Associates, The Pluralist Generation, 2012
    16. 16. I trust Mom & Dad I’ll listen to Boss Boss reminds of Mom & Dad Mom & Dad always give me good advice I listen to Mom & Dad Adapted from Nicole Lipkin and April Perrymore, Y in the Workplace: Managing the "Me First" Generation, 2010
    17. 17.  Authority – How to be an authority to older customers  Communications competence – talk on the phone  Endurance – stick with the program long enough to be successful  Social Networking – how to leverage your social network for business, and how to do old-school in person networking
    18. 18. Help the client identify explicit need Let the client know you understand the need Bring focus on how your solution (you) solves the need ASK FOR THE BUSINESS
    19. 19. PRELIMINARIES 5% 80% DEMONSTRATING CAPABILITIES 10% INVESTIGATING 5% OBTAINING COMMITMENT Successful sales professionals put their main effort here.
    20. 20. Image credit: stlylephotographs / 123RF Stock Photo
    21. 21. Sales call reluctance is the fear of self-promotion in professional sales .
    22. 22. Not Selling, 59 .0% CSO Insight, 2011 Selling, 41 .0%
    23. 23. 35000 30000 Opportunity Gap 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 11-Jan 11-Feb 11-Mar 11-Apr 11-May 11-Jun Anticipated Calls 11-Jul 11-Aug Cumulative Calls 11-Sep 11-Oct 11-Nov 11-Dec
    24. 24. Category Anticipated Calls Cumulative Calls Missed Calls Missed Meetings Missed Deals (1/4) Average Commission Missed Revenue Metric 32,700 26,501 (6,199) (32) (8) $30,000 $(240,000)
    25. 25.  Introduce two other connectors or two people with an idea in mind  Have a dinner of interesting people  Follow up  Re-establish contact  Show up  Interview people  Produce something of value  Time Adapted from James Altrucher, Become a SuperConnector, October 2011 Image credit: Ratchanida Thippayos / 123RF Stock Photo
    26. 26.  Be brutally honest in the interview  Don’t hire them if you sense a whiff of entitlement  Do a hunger check  Everyone announces themselves in the interview  Shake them up a little  When you find the good ones, help them move up – even if that means losing them Lesley Jane Seymour, How I Hire: 6 Ways I Find and Hire Hardworking Millennials, Sept 24, 2103
    27. 27.        Protecting through surveillance Evidence-based parenting Focus on process What’s best for MY child Teaching children what they need to be successful Realistic – only do what you’re good at Only the best wins Adapted from Frank N. Magid Associates, The Pluralist Generation, 2012
    28. 28. 1975 – 2011 Changes Bachelor’s Degree Earnings: 13% Advanced Degree Earnings: 24% College Tuition increase: 127% OKC 3.2% New Orleans 2.1% Nashville 1.8% Salt Lake 0.4% San Antonio 8.1% Houston 47.7% Austin 13.7% Dallas 22.9% Only 9 MSAs (of largest 60) have created net new middle class jobs since 2007. 48% were in Houston.
    29. 29.  Have them host a garage sale  Start a local newspaper or niche blog  Be a consultant to local retailers  Become a blogmaster for other kids  Have them write a book and sell it online  Pay them for good grades/to do their homework  TEACH THEM HOW TO LEARN FROM FAILURE James Altrucher, How to Turn Your 12 Year Old Into an Entrepreneur, December 2010, http://www.jamesaltucher.com/2010/12/how-to-turn-your-12-year-old-into-an-entrepreneur/
    30. 30. • • Average person produces 200% more information than in 1986 • Image credit: michaeljung / 123RF Stock Photo Average person receives the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of information everyday – 500% increase from 1986 In 1986, you could store 75% of the knowledge needed for your job in your head, today it’s less than 10%
    31. 31. • Public speaking/debate/drama • Fundraising for non-profits or work at a phone bank for political campaigns • Learn 7 Cs of Communication: • • Concise • Concrete • Correct • Coherent • Complete • Image credit: michaeljung / 123RF Stock Photo Clear Courteous
    32. 32. • • 25% of Baby Boomers say they will never retire • Stay at home parenting peaked in 2004 • Only 39% of stay at home parents return to work in their original field • Image credit: michaeljung / 123RF Stock Photo 15% of managers already are Millennials Extension of careers beyond traditional retirement age will have same impact as women entering the workforce did
    33. 33. You should feel the greatest satisfaction if one day your subordinate can do your job better than you ever did, not disparaging. For this is the ultimate in achievement …. The next generation must be more than ready to fill our shoes; they must be ready to run faster in them. -Lieutenant Col. Om Prakash, 87th Flying Training Squadron commander

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