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Stevens Henager College Online Catalog 2010-2011
 

Stevens Henager College Online Catalog 2010-2011

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Stevens Henager College online course catalog 2010-2011. Download SHC online course catalog to explore career focused online programs, learn about course requirements and in-depth course descriptions.

Stevens Henager College online course catalog 2010-2011. Download SHC online course catalog to explore career focused online programs, learn about course requirements and in-depth course descriptions.

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    Stevens Henager College Online Catalog 2010-2011 Stevens Henager College Online Catalog 2010-2011 Document Transcript

    • ONLINERIGHT COLLEGE RIGHT DEGREE RIGHT CAREER RIGHT TIME RIGHT NOW
    • Table of Contents Page PageIntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Course Repetitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Mission and Objectives, History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Graduation Requirements and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Admissions and Support Centers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Degrees Granted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Distance Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Graduation Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Majors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Course Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Credit Transfers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Credit by Examination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20School of Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20MS Healthcare Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21MS Nursing Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21MS Nursing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21BS Health Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Funding Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21BS Nursing Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Canceling Enrollment Prior to Starting Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21BS Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Cancellation after Classes Have Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21School of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21Business Administration (MBA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Return of Title IV Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21BS Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Earning and Returning Title IV Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22BS Business Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Sample Refund Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22AS Business Management and Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Refund Calculation Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22School of Graphic Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22BS Graphic Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23AS Graphic Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Tutoring, Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23School of Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23BS Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Library - SHARC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23Admissions Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24Campus Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24Admissions Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Student Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24Master’s Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Student Complaint/Grievance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24Admissions Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Fully Online Student Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Governmental Agencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Online Attendance Requirements and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Program Modernization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Guidelines and Procedures for Online Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Disaster Affecting the College’s Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Disability Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 What is a Disability? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Equipment for Student Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Exceptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Grading System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Eligibility for Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Passing Grades. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Documentation Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25Grade Reports, Course Withdrawal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Accommodations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26Program Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Title IX and VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26Dismissal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Vocational Rehabilitation Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26Readmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27Maximum Time Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Administration/Faculty/Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39Satisfactory Academic Progress Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40Probation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 SHC Legal Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41Satisfactory Progress Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18Standards of Progress for Veterans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18Appeal, Extenuating Circumstances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Reestablishing Eligibility for Federal Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Incompletes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Occupational Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19Prerequisite Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Stevens-Henager College
    • Introduction A Message from the Chairman Education to advance your career can mean a better life for you—one filled with more opportunities, higher pay, greater understanding of the world around you, and all the benefits success can bring. Stevens-Henager College offers today’s way to learn—online, on your schedule, at home, at work, while traveling, wherever you wish—24/7. Stevens-Henager College courses are designed specifically for adults; they are the flexible, affordable, and convenient way to learn. There are no on-campus classes, no registration lines to stand in…just quality education. Carl B. Barney Chairman Your complete, distance education delivers: • Textbooks and study materials that are developed by experts and made available online. • Services and assistance online or by phone. • Help when you need it. Our experienced staff members guide and help you through your program. • Distance education that is comparable to or even better than an on-campus program.* • A convenient and practical solution for your educational needs, without sacrificing your current job, family or social commitments. Earn the credentials you need for promotion, for licensure, to start a new career—or just study for your own personal satisfaction. For more than 119 years, Stevens-Henager College (SHC) has helped working adults like you to get the educational credentials they need to advance their careers. Our experienced, student-oriented staff is prepared to assist you throughout your distance education experience. “Distance Education is no longer the future of higher learning, it is today’s reality. Students can now earn a complete education from an accredited institution at a time and place that enables them to maintain their responsibilities as parents, workers, and community members.” — Barbara Thomas, Chief Operations Officer*In a survey of supervisors of distance-learning graduates, more than 90% thought that graduates compared favorably in knowledge, skills, and attitude to those with resident degrees. See www.detc.org/freepublications.html To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 3
    • Mission and Objectives discuss your education plans with you by phone or in person. For in-personHistory and Mission admissions information, see below for a location near you. Choose the location that’s best for you, and call to get started.Mission and ObjectivesWe are dedicated to helping our students graduate and get a much better job Stevens-Henager Collegesooner. We focus on educating people for careers. Our goal is for our students to Boise Branch Layton Satelliteachieve success in career-oriented programs that will culminate in satisfactory 1444 So. Entertainment Ave. 1660 West Antelope Drivecareer placement in entry-level positions in their field of work or advancement Boise, ID 83709 Suite 115in their current employment. To fulfill this goal, the College: Layton, UT 84041 1. Provides training that enables students to achieve skills and competency Idaho Falls CEC in their chosen vocation or profession. 3200 Channing Way, Provo/Orem Branch Suite A305 1476 Sandhill Road 2. Assists students in becoming competent members of their communities Idaho Falls, ID 83404 Orem, UT 84058 so each can appreciate and successfully cope with the human relations problems encountered in the workplace. Nampa Satellite Lehi Satellite 16819 N. Marketplace Blvd. 1250 East 200 South 3. Provides degree programs that bring students a fuller realization of the Nampa, ID 83687 Suite 1G world in which they live and work, so they are capable of achieving a Lehi, Utah 84043 satisfactory and rewarding career and lifestyle. Logan Branch 755 South Main Street St. George CECHistory Logan, UT 84321 720 South River Road Suite C-130Stevens-Henager College was founded in Ogden, Utah, in September 1891 Ogden Main St. George, Utah 84790by Professor J.A. Smith as the Intermountain Business College. The college’s 1890 South 1350 Westpurpose was to teach commercial subjects and place graduates in business West Haven, UT 84401 Salt Lake City/Murray** Branchpositions. The college was known over the following 68 years as Smithsonian 383 West Vine StreetBusiness College, Moench University of Business, and Ogden Business Murray, UT 84123College. In 1959 the name was changed to Stevens-Henager College. The maincampus is in Ogden. Branches were established in Provo, Utah, in June 1978; CollegeAmericaSalt Lake City, Utah, in August 1999; Logan, Utah, in October 2001; and inBoise, Idaho, in April 2004. Cheyenne Branch Fort Collins Branch 6101 Yellowstone Road 4601 South Mason StreetToday, Stevens-Henager College is known for its high educational standards. Cheyenne, WY 82009 Fort Collins, CO 80525Academic majors are designed specifically to meet the changing trends andrequirements of the business and medical employment markets. Business, Colorado Springs Branch Flagstaff Maintechnical, and medical leaders have come to recognize Stevens-Henager College 3645 Citadel Drive South 3012 East Route 66graduates for their superior training and their outstanding professionalism. Colorado Springs, CO 80909 Flagstaff, AZ 86004 Denver Main Phoenix Branch 1385 South Colorado Blvd. 9801 North Metro Parkway EastDeveloped by Experts Denver, CO 80222 Phoenix, Arizona 85051Stevens-Henager College programs are specifically developed for independentdistance study by educational experts, instructional designers, and technology California College San Diegoprofessionals. What makes SHC’s curriculum stand out is that our course California Collegeexperts have designed real-world materials to help you develop knowledge and San Diego Mainskills that you can apply immediately, at work and in your life. 2820 Camino Del Rio S. San Diego, CA 92108Your Admissions andSupport CentersAt our College, you may study independently, but you will never be alone. Wehave built an extensive student support network throughout the West.As an online student, you will also have access to on-ground campuses andsupport centers. SHC’s campuses, College Education Centers+ (CEC), andrelationships with our sister colleges broaden the resources and servicesavailable to you as a student. Our family of colleges is your personal support network. Stevens-Henager College started building relationships with employers over 100 years ago.Enroll with Local Support Today those relationships and those of our sister colleges pay off in jobs for our graduates in cities throughout the West. Call the number below or visit aFrom applying to the College to accessing a tutor, guest lectures, and even a broadband location near you to enroll.Internet connection, your education support network includes campuses in six states + College Education Center: Support center for online students. Offers computer lab, tutoring and otherand our expanding network of College Education Centers in local communities. services. No programs are taught at CEC locations.For more information on our programs and Admissions and support centers, **Fully online programs are offered through Salt Lake City/Murray.or to schedule a visit, call the College at 800-279-3498. A friendly advisor will 4 Stevens-Henager College
    • Distance Education them online and get your score immediately. For any questions you miss,You Can Earn an Education the correct answer is given so that you can immediately learn as you take tests. Instead of travelling to the registrar’s office, review your transcript,Without Sitting in a get your grades or account status, and see other information at your fingertips—online.Single Classroom 3. Communication tools—You don’t have to leave home or work. YouAdvances in technology have made earning your degree more convenient than save precious time. You make your own schedule. You study anythingever before. Through the power of the Internet, you, a busy adult, can get the anytime, any place, and at your own pace; not the pace set by the class oreducation you need to get ahead and potentially increase your earning power. an instructor. You can use the Internet, e-mail, threaded conversations,You do not have to commute, park, arrange dependent care, or attend on- and other technology to interact with fellow students as you participateground scheduled classes. You set the time, choose the place, and set your own in synchronous and asynchronous group activities. Course email allowsstudy schedule. You are in charge of your own education. you to communicate with your professors and with fellow students. YouHow Do Online Courses Work at Stevens-Henager College? gain a deeper understanding of the material and can exchange opinions and ideas with people in the same course(s). • Enroll at the SHC website (www.stevenshenager.edu). 4. Study materials available 24/7. You walk step-by-step through your • E-Books are provided for each course. course materials with synchronous and asynchronous learning. The • Communicate with instructors through email, discussion forums, and live materials guide you through the lessons in your own home, office, or virtual classrooms. other location. • Complete and submit assignments online. • Online courses start each module (4 weeks). • Access student services and receive academic advising online. Majors Stevens-Henager College offers a choice of programs and majors, each designedCourse delivery methods: to prepare students for a particular career in the fields of healthcare, business, and graphic arts. Relatively short, yet comprehensive, these programs are 1) Asynchronous Distance – Internet-based courses that are not time or carefully planned to provide the best education possible. location specific. A student interacts with the coursework, prepared by an instructor, using the Internet and our Learning Management System Master’s degrees in the following majors: named ANGEL. Business Administration (MBA) Healthcare Administration 2) Synchronous Distance – Internet courses that are time but not location Nursing Administration specific (i.e., classes are scheduled for a specific time, but can be accessed Nursing Education via the Internet). In some programs students will be expected to attend some courses offered in a synchronous format. Students interact in Bachelor’s degrees in the following majors: real time with classmates and the instructor using the Internet and a Accounting software product called Elluminate. Elluminate allows the students to ask Business Administration questions, either verbally or through text, and get responses immediately. Business Administration (with emphasis in Property Management) Computer ScienceDistance Education Right for You? Graphic Arts Health Science (completion)Online education courses demand the same dedicated student effort as Nursing (completion)traditional classroom-based courses. The material is college-level and you will Nursing Administration (completion)need self-motivation and self discipline to succeed. Associate’s degrees in the following majors: Business Management and Accounting Business Management and Accounting The most practical way to learn . (with emphasis in Property Management) Our distance education programs are the most credible, effective Graphic Arts alternative to a traditional classroom education. Developed by experts, Stevens-Henager College reserves the right to vary the order in which courses Stevens-Henager College’s courses are specifically designed and are presented within each curriculum; and also reserves the right to update developed for independent study by practitioners and professionals who and make changes to the subject matter and course material, and to adjust the have experience in their field. time scheduled for a curriculum, with approval of ACCSC (the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges) as necessary. Such changes do not increase the total price beyond the amount stated in the EnrollmentHow We Make Distance Education Work for You Agreement. 1. Faculty and staff available. Many students who attend SHC Online have busy schedules and are unable to complete course work during regular business hours. Your personal Academic Advisor will assist you. An online staff member is available after hours between 8PM -12AM Definition of Credit MST. Associate Deans, instructors, and other staff members are available Academic credit is measured in quarter credit hours. A clock hour is equal to to answer your questions. 50 minutes of instruction. One-quarter credit hour is equivalent to 10 clock 2. Online services available 24/7. Our user-friendly website provides access hours in class, 20 clock hours in a laboratory, or 30 clock hours devoted to to Stevens-Henager College’s Student Services. Rather than traveling to externship; or a combination of the three. classes and sitting for quizzes and tests in the classroom, you can take To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 5
    • Frequently Asked Questions are ready to begin, simply enroll online or contact an Admissions ConsultantCourse Numbering System (800-279-3498).Courses numbered 100 to 299 are considered basic to the learning process ofthe student. Courses numbered 300 to 499 are generally considered upper level How can I pay the tuition?work. Courses numbered 500 and 600 are graduate level courses. Everyone can afford to earn a college degree. Financial aid is available for those who qualify, and SHC also offers a variety of private tuition assistanceCourse Codes programs, including loans, scholarships, and grants. There is a financial plan for everyone.ACC AccountingAPP Computer ApplicationsCIS Computer Information Systems What programs does Stevens-Henager College offer?DES Design We offer master’s, bachelor’s, and associate’s degrees. Choose from healthcare,ECN Economics business, or graphic arts. You’ll find complete details about each programENG English in this catalog.FIN FinanceHCA Healthcare Administration Can I transfer in my previous credits?HCP Healthcare PracticesHCS Healthcare Science Absolutely! Credits earned at a school accredited by an agency recognized byHSA Health Services Administration the U.S. Department of Education are eligible. We also review credits earnedHSM Health Services Management through ACE, CLEP, DANTES/DSST, AP, ACT, Excelsior/Regents/PEP, andHIS History USAFI.MAN ManagementMAT Mathematics How soon can I graduate?MBA Master’s in Business Administration If you have previous course credits, you could finish a degree in as little as oneMCS Microcomputer Systems year depending on the program.MED MedicalNET Networking What is online distance education?NUR Nursing Online distance education offers you many of the same programs, textbooks,OPS Operating Systems and services as a campus-based university, but everything is at your fingertipsPHI Philosophy 24/7—at home, at work, while traveling, or while serving in the military. AllPRG Programming of your courses and services are just a click away.PSY PsychologyREH RehabilitationSOC Sociology You are never alone .STA Statistics You study independently, but you are never alone. You have access to online services, qualified instructors, and a student advisor. ManyWhy You Should Enroll in students team up as study partners with other willing students in their area or online. Then you can study together, providing mutualStevens-Henager College: motivation and support.Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Who enrolls in Stevens-Henager College?Our students are mature, working, successful, motivated adults who want adegree to advance their careers. They need, and must have, a flexible, focused,fast educational track, which is what SHC offers.Why do students enroll in Stevens-Henager College?For the pride, prestige, and earning power that a college degree offers. Forcareer advancement, promotion, preparation for licensure, a new job, andthe possibility of a higher salary. A degree opens doors that may have beenpreviously closed.Is SHC Accredited?Yes. SHC is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools andColleges (ACCSC). ACCSC, recognized by the United States Department ofEducation as a private, non-profit, independent accrediting agency, is dedicatedto ensuring a quality education for more than 200,000 students who annuallypursue career education at approximately 800 ACCSC accredited institutions.Do I have to wait for a semester to start?No. With SHC’s continuous enrollments, you can start any month. When you 6 Stevens-Henager College
    • School of Healthcare School of Healthcare Tradition and Innovation: Experience Healthcare Education at Stevens-Henager College Since its founding, Stevens-Henager College has committed itself to meet the changing trends and requirements of the healthcare and business markets. The Online Campus of Stevens-Henager College continues this legacy of service to healthcare professions. Read on to learn how Stevens-Henager College can help you earn the credentials needed to be successful in today’s dynamic healthcare industry. Master of Science Completion Degrees • Healthcare Administration • Nursing Administration • Nursing Education Bachelor of Science Degrees • Health Science • Nursing • Nursing AdministrationHealthcare Administration Nursing AdministrationMaster of Science Master of ScienceLength of Program: 15 months. Length of Program: 15 months.The Master of Healthcare Administration program is designed to provide The Nursing Administration graduate program prepares nurses foreducational and research activities that will develop the student’s opportunity administrative positions in leadership and management in managed care, hometo make healthcare delivery more effective and efficient. Students enrolled healthcare, long-term care, professional and other health-related organizations.in this program will receive instruction on processes for evaluating and Program content focuses on management and organizational theory, ethicalimproving health policy. Graduates are employed as entry level health service and legal issues, and healthcare delivery systems. Health information systems,administrators or policy analysts. The position attained will vary according to and the management of human, and financial resources is also studied.the background and experience the graduate. Graduates may be employed as entry-level nurse managers in hospitals, clinics, and private healthcare settings. A valid RN license is required to be admittedCourse No . Course Name Credits into this program.ECN 642 Healthcare Economics and Policy Analysis 4.0FIN 655 Healthcare Finance 4.0 Course No . Course Name CreditsHCA 542 Issues in Managed Care 4.0 HCA 542 Issues in Managed Care 4.0HCA 550 Organizational Behavior 4.0 HSA 505 Health Service Organizations and Management 4.5HCA 600 Management Practices for the Healthcare Professional 4.5 HSA 512 Health Service Economics 4.5HCA 640 Healthcare Administration and Policy 4.5 HSA 518 Health Services Financial Management 4.0HCA 675 Healthcare Personnel Administration 4.0 HSA 538 Health Services Marketing 4.0HCA 690 Final Project/Thesis 4.0 HSA 544 Outcomes Assessment and Quality Management 4.0HCS 615 The Healthcare System 4.0 HSA 552 Healthcare Information Systems 4.0HSA 544 Outcomes Assessment and Quality Management 4.0 HSM 515 Legal Considerations in Healthcare Delivery 4.5HSA 552 Healthcare Information Systems 4.0 NUR 601 Nursing Administration I 4.0HSM 515 Legal Considerations in Healthcare Delivery 4.5 NUR 651 Nursing Administration II 4.0HSM 520 Healthcare Marketing and Planning 4.0 NUR 652 Advanced Nursing Theory 4.0MAT 610 Quantitative Methods 4.0 NUR 653 Leadership Theory 4.0 NUR 668 Research and Evaluation Methods 4.0TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 57 .5 NUR 690 Capstone Project 4.0With the Dean’s permission, students may replace one HSA course withNUR585 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology. TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 57 .5 Students may replace HSA512, HSA518, and HSA538 with NUR670, NUR673, and NUR675 if they wish to graduate with a Master of Science in Nursing Administration (with an emphasis in nursing education). With the Dean’s permission, students may replace one HSA course with NUR585 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 7
    • School of Healthcare Course No . Course Name CreditsNursing Education HCA 300 The Healthcare System 4.0 HCA 432 Healthcare Economics and Policy 4.0Master of Science HCA 440 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare Administration 4.0Length of Program: 15 months. (CPT for international students could HCA 460 Health Facility Operations 4.0extend the program to 24 months.) HCA 462 Long Term Care Administration 4.0The Nursing Education graduate program prepares nurses to be a nurse educator MAN 444 Human Resource Management 4.0in a variety of settings including higher education, vocational education, staff MED 350 Clinical Information Systems 4.0development, and patient education. Program content prepares graduates to MED 370 Health Principles 4.0develop skills as educators, including understanding current theories and MED 380 Human Pathology 4.0nursing practice as well as addressing key educational issues in education. MED 385 Issues in Public Health 4.0Admissions Requirements MED 401 Advanced Human Anatomy 4.0 MED 410 Research in Health Science 4.0Students seeking admission to the MSNE Program must hold a valid Registered MED 450 Principles of Epidemiology 4.0Nurse license. NUR 335 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 4.0Course No . Course Name Credits NUR 360 Community and Family Health 4.5HSA 505 Health Service Organizations and Management 4.5 NUR 425 Psychological Aspects of Illness and Disability 4.5HSA 544 Outcomes Assessment and Quality Management 4.0 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESHSM 515 Legal Considerations in Healthcare Delivery 4.5 ENG 310 Advanced Interpersonal Communication 4.0NUR 542 Teaching Critical Thinking and Clinical Decisions 4.0 MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0NUR 545 Technologies for Nursing Education and Practice 4.0 PHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.0NUR 652 Advanced Nursing Theory 4.0 PHI 400 Modern Issues in Ethics 4.0NUR 653 Leadership Theory 4.0 PSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0NUR 668 Research and Evaluation Methods 4.0 SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0NUR 670 Instructional Strategies 4.0 STA 322 Statistics 4.0NUR 672 Issues in Nursing 4.0NUR 673 Evaluation Strategies 4.0 TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 93 .0NUR 675 Program Development 4.0NUR 680 Advanced Pharmacology 4.0NUR 692 Nurse Education Practicum 6.0 Nursing AdministrationTOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 59 .0 Bachelor of Science Completion DegreeWith the Dean’s permission, students may replace one HSA course with Length of Program: 20 months.NUR585 Contemporary Issues in Gerontology. This program is available to registered nurses (RNs) only. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Administration (BSNA) program is a degree completion program that enhances career opportunities for RNs. This program preparesHealth Science students with the appropriate academic skills for entry-level supervisory positions in healthcare. Because the focus of this program is leadership basedBachelor of Science Completion Degree and not clinical training, clinical externships are not required. A valid RNLength of Program: 20 months. license is required to be admitted into this program.The Bachelor of Science in Health Science program is a degree completionprogram that enhances career opportunities for healthcare professionals. Course No . Course Name Credits HCA 300 The Healthcare System 4.0The Health Science Bachelor’s completion program provides healthcare HCA 450 Organizational Behavior 4.0professionals with knowledge in management and organization, ethics and HCP 460 Case Management 4.5policy issues, communication, informatics, and statistics. Graduates may be HCS 440 Home Healthcare 4.0employed in areas which include but are not limited to: Healthcare, HMO, MAN 444 Human Resource Management 4.0and Hospital Administration; Health Communications; Health Education, NUR 300 Research in Nursing Practice 4.0Health Promotion; Patient or Client Relations; Community Health Policy; NUR 310 Pathophysiology 4.0and Long-term Care Facility Administration. NUR 315 Professional Role Development 4.5Admissions Requirements NUR 325 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 4.0Students seeking admission to the Bachelor of Science in Health Science NUR 335 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 4.0Program must be a graduate of an associate degree level health sciences NUR 340 Health Assessment 4.0program (i.e., medical assisting, respiratory therapy, nurse education, surgical NUR 360 Community and Family Health 4.5technology, etc.) from an accredited institution or must have completed NUR 425 Psychological Aspects of Illness and Disability 4.5sufficient college credit to attain the equivalent of third year college status NUR 450 Nursing Informatics 4.0(e.g., 45 semester credit hours or 68 quarter credit hours) in the discipline of NUR 465 Evidence-Based Nursing 4.5health science. Prospective students should also have completed an appropriate NUR 480 Nursing Management and Leadership 4.0number of credit hours of general education (e.g., 15 semester credit hours GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESand 22.5 quarter credit hours). Semester hours will be converted to quarter ENG 310 Advanced Interpersonal Communication 4.0credit hours using the standard formula of semester hours x 1.5 = quarter credit HIS 300 U.S. History Since the Civil War 4.0hours. For example: 3 semester hours equal 4.5 quarter credit hours. PHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.0 PHI 400 Modern Issues in Ethics 4.0 8 Stevens-Henager College
    • School of HealthcarePSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 90 .5NursingBachelor of Science Completion DegreeLength of Program: 20 months.This program is available to registered nurses (RNs) only. The advancementof the RN to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program preparesRNs to address the challenges in healthcare by expanding upon their nursingeducation and experience. Graduates are prepared for leadership roles and post-graduate study in nursing. This program incorporates theory and research-based knowledge to the delivery of care within a global society. The BSN isprepared to integrate essential nursing theories and principles within varioushealthcare settings.Admissions RequirementsStudents seeking admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program musthold a valid Registered Nurse license and shall have completed sufficient collegecredits to attain the equivalent of third-year college status (e.g., 60 semestercredit hours or 90 quarter credit hours). Prospective students should also havecompleted the appropriate number of credit hours of general education (e.g.,15 semester credit hours or 22.5 quarter credit hours). Semester hours will beconverted to quarter credit hours using the standard formula of semester hoursx 1.5 = quarter credit hours. For example: 3 semester hours equal 4.5 quartercredit hours.Course No . Course Name CreditsHCA 300 The Healthcare System 4.0HCP 460 Case Management 4.5NUR 300 Research in Nursing Practice 4.0NUR 310 Pathophysiology 4.0NUR 315 Professional Role Development 4.5NUR 325 Theoretical Foundations of Nursing 4.0NUR 335 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 4.0NUR 340 Health Assessment 4.0NUR 360 Community and Family Health 4.5NUR 421 Critical Issues in Nursing 4.0NUR 425 Psychological Aspects of Illness and Disability 4.5NUR 450 Nursing Informatics 4.0NUR 465 Evidence-Based Nursing 4.5NUR 480 Nursing Management and Leadership 4.0NUR 481 Leadership, Power and Politics in Nursing 4.0NUR 490 Senior Project 4.0GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESENG 310 Advanced Interpersonal Communication 4.0HIS 300 U.S. History Since the Civil War 4.0MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0PHI 400 Modern Issues in Ethics 4.0SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0STA 322 Statistics 4.0TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 90 .5All colleges offer programs designed to prepare students for careers inhealthcare and business.Additional programs are offered at affiliated colleges. See the programdescriptions in this catalog for further information.All colleges reserve the right to vary the order in which courses are offeredwithin each program, and to adjust the length of time scheduled for a specificcurriculum. Such changes will not increase the total tuition beyond the amountstated in the Enrollment Agreement. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 9
    • School of Business School of Business Education for the 21st Century: Experience Education in Business at Stevens-Henager College For many, a business degree is necessary to advance in a competitive work place. For too many, however, this degree has been a luxury—vital but out of reach as work and personal commitments make a traditional on-campus education impossible. Stevens-Henager College business programs are the flexible, convenient way to gain the knowledge of business that you need to succeed. Master of Business Degree • Business Administration (MBA) Bachelor of Science Degree • Accounting • Business Administration • Business Administration with Emphasis in Property Management Associate of Science Degree • Business Management and Accounting • Business Management and Accounting with Emphasis in Property Management Certificate • Property ManagementBusiness Administration (MBA) AccountingMaster of Business Administration Bachelor of ScienceLength of Program: 15 months. Length of Program: 36 Months (may be completed in as few as 30 months under a flexible schedule)The Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide theknowledge and skills needed to become an effective manager in a variety of The Accounting Bachelor’s Degree prepares the graduate for entry into positionsorganizational settings. It is a comprehensive program designed to provide with public accounting firms and similarly challenging positions with private,the graduate with the background to advance in their career rather than governmental, and nonprofit organizations. The objectives of the major are totraining targeting a particular job within an organization. The broad goal provide the graduate with an understanding of business and financial conceptsof the program is to provide students with the foundations in content and and how they relate to professional accounting, and include the principles ofcompetencies that will support their development as effective managers in a federal taxation, auditing, and accounting for small business and corporations.variety of organizational settings. Accounting graduates are employed in entry-level to mid-level positions as office manager, accounting specialist, accounting technician, or bookkeeper.Course No . Course Name CreditsMBA 601 Financial Accounting for Management 4.0 Course No . Course Name CreditsMBA 602 Dynamics of the Organization 4.0 ACC 101 Accounting Fundamentals I 6.0MBA 603 Marketing Management 4.0 ACC 103 Payroll Accounting 4.0MBA 604 Corporate Finance 4.0 ACC 108 Computerized Accounting 3.0MBA 605 Information Technology and Society 4.0 ACC 212 Spreadsheets 3.5MBA 606 Communication Dynamics for Professionals 4.5 ACC 213 Accounting Principles I 6.0MBA 607 International Management 4.5 ACC 215 Accounting Principles II 6.0MBA 608 Statistics for Management 4.0 ACC 217 Managerial Accounting 4.0MBA 609 Applications in Economic Analysis 4.0 ACC 233 Income Tax 3.5MBA 610 General Management 4.5 ACC 320 Intermediate Accounting I 6.0MBA 611 Developing Business Strategy 4.0 ACC 322 Intermediate Accounting II 6.0MBA 612 Leadership Theory 4.0 ACC 332 Federal Tax Accounting I 3.5MBA 613 Advanced Human resource Management 4.0 ACC 333 Federal Tax Accounting II 3.5MBA 614 Capstone Project 4.0 ACC 335 Principles of Auditing I 3.5 ACC 337 Intermediate Cost Accounting 3.0TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 57 .5 ACC 338 Intermediate Computerized Accounting 3.0 ACC 436 Principles of Auditing II 3.5 ACC 442 Advanced Accounting I 3.5 ACC 443 Advanced Accounting II 3.5 ACC 444 Advanced Accounting III 3.5 10 Stevens-Henager College
    • School of BusinessAPP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5 MAN 222 Investment Principles 4.0APP 126 Databases 3.5 MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0FIN 231 Principles of Finance 4.0 MAN 224 Business Law 4.0MAN 103 Management Principles 4.0 MAN 324 Operations Management 4.0MAN 104 Business Practices 4.0 MAN 350 Management Planning Principles 4.0MAN 105 Marketing 4.0 MAN 443 Organizational Design and Change 4.0MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0 MAN 444 Human Resource Management 4.0MAN 222 Investment Principles 4.0 MAN 450 International Business Principles 4.0MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0 PSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0MAN 224 Business Law 4.0 PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0MAN 324 Operations Management 4.0PRG 101 Solutions Concepts 3.5 GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESPSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0 ECN 220 Economics 4.0PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0 ECN 221 Economic Principles 4.0 ENG 101 English Composition 4.0GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ENG 103 Writing 4.0ECN 220 Economics 4.0 ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0ECN 221 Economic Principles 4.0 HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0ENG 101 English Composition 4.0 MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0ENG 103 Writing 4.0 PHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.0ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0 PSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0 SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0HIS 300 US History Since the Civil War 4.0 STA 322 Statistics 4.0MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0 Students must complete a minimum of 32 credit hours in one of the areas ofPHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.0 emphasis below.PSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0 Business Administration EmphasisSTA 322 Statistics 4.0 ACC 108 Computerized Accounting 3.0 ACC 233 Income Tax 3.5TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 181 .0 APP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substituted APP 126 Databases 3.5course is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each program FIN 445 Financial Management IV 4.0contains a mathematics general education course. MAN 230 Advertising Principle 4.0 MAN 335 Retail Marketing Principle 4.0 MAN 436 Selling and Sales Management 4.0Business Administration PRG 101 Solutions Concepts 3.5 TOTAL MINIMUM NUMBER OF CREDITS: 182 .0Bachelor of ScienceLength of Program: 36 Months (may be completed in as few as 30 months Property Management Emphasisunder a flexible schedule) MAN 225 Property Management Fundamentals 4.0The Business Administration program prepares graduates for a variety of MAN 227 Intermediate Property Management 4.0responsible managerial positions in both domestic and international firms. MAN 229 Federal and Contractor Focused Property Management 4.0The objectives of the program are to provide a foundation in accounting, MAN 280 Property Management Applications 4.0sales and marketing, operations management, human resource management MAN 340 Finance and Accounting for Property Management 4.0and banking and finance and to provide the graduate with an integrated MAN 342 Property Management Research and Writing Applications 4.0understanding of business and economic concepts and how they relate to the MAN 346 Basic Contracts, Agreements, and Grants 4.0global economy. Business Administration graduates are employed in entry-level MAN 460 Managing a Property Management Organization 4.0to mid-level positions as an office manager, account manager, small business TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 182 .0developer, human resource assistant, or sales manager. General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substitutedCourse No . Course Name Credits course is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each programACC 101 Accounting Fundamentals I 6.0 contains a mathematics general education course.ACC 103 Payroll Accounting 4.0ACC 213 Accounting Principles I 6.0ACC 215 Accounting Principles II 6.0ACC 217 Managerial Accounting 4.0FIN 231 Principles of Finance 4.0FIN 333 Finance 4.0FIN 334 Financial Management I 4.0FIN 443 Financial Management II 4.0FIN 444 Financial Management III 4.0MAN 103 Management Principles 4.0MAN 104 Business Practices 4.0MAN 105 Marketing 4.0MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0 To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 11
    • School of Business General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substitutedBusiness Management course is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each program contains a mathematics general education course.and Accounting *These four courses replace the preceding courses: ACC103, MAN222,Associate of Applied Science MAN223, and FIN231.Length of Program: 20 Months (may be completed in as few as 15 monthsunder a flexible schedule)The Business Management and Accounting program prepares students fora variety of responsible managerial positions. Due to the diversity of theprogram courses, the student will build a strong foundation in accounting,marketing, insurance, finance, electronic commerce and real estate. Objectivesof the program are as follows: providing the student with an integratedunderstanding of business and economic concepts and how these conceptsrelate to business and social systems; the recognition of ethical responsibilitiesand accountability; the development of planning, decision-making, and othermanagement functions; the capacity to implement and adapt to change; anddevelopment of analytic thinking and leadership style. Graduates are employedin entry-level positions as bookkeepers, clerical assistants, and personalproperty professionals.Course No . Course Name CreditsACC 101 Accounting Fundamentals I 6.0ACC 103 Payroll Accounting 4.0ACC 108 Computerized Accounting 3.0ACC 213 Accounting Principles I 6.0ACC 233 Income Tax 3.5APP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5APP 126 Databases 3.5FIN 231 Principles of Finance 4.0MAN 103 Management Principles 4.0MAN 104 Business Practices 4.0MAN 105 Marketing 4.0MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0MAN 222 Investment Principles 4.0MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0MAN 224 Business Law 4.0PRG 101 Solutions Concepts 3.5PSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESECN 220 Economics 4.0ENG 101 English Composition 4.0ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0PHI 221 Introduction to Logic 4.0TOTAL MINIMUM NUMBER OF CREDITS 97 .0To obtain the Business and Accounting with Emphasis in Property ManagementDegree, students must complete the courses below.Property Management Emphasis*MAN 225 Property Management Fundamentals 4.0MAN 227 Intermediate Property Management 4.0MAN 229 Federal and Contractor Focused Property Management 4.0MAN 280 Property Management Applications 4.0TOTAL MINIMUM NUMBER OF CREDITS 97 .0Students who successfully complete the four courses in Property ManagementEmphasis are eligible to sit for the National Property Management AssociationCertified Professional Property Specialist Examination. 12 Stevens-Henager College
    • School of Graphic Arts School of Graphic Arts Education for the Application of Art to Enhance the Face of Business A Graphic Arts degree prepares students for a rewarding career in the art industry that is both technical and creative. From advertising design, multimedia applications, and web design to marketing, this field is varied and exciting. Bachelor of Science Degree • Graphic Arts Associate Science Degree • Graphic Arts DES 375 Advanced Package Design 3.0Graphic Arts DES 380 Advanced Illustrator 3.0 DES 460 Advanced Photoshop 3.0Bachelor of Science DES 470 Advanced Advertising Design II 3.0Length of Program: 36 Months (may be completed in as few as 30 months DES 475 Digital Photography 3.0under a flexible schedule) DES 499 Design Capstone Project 3.0The Bachelor of Science Degree in Graphic Arts prepares students to MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0plan, analyze, and create visual solutions to communication challenges. MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0The combination of the study of theory and a mastery of in-studio visual MAN 230 Advertising Principle 4.0communication methods enables students to get messages across in print, MAN 333 Advanced Marketing 4.0electronic, and film media using a variety of methods such as color, type, MAN 436 Selling and Sales Management 4.0illustration, photography, animation, and various print and layout techniques. MAN 443 Organizational Design and Change 4.0Graduates may seek employment in advertising agencies, design studios, PSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0publishing houses, or corporate communication departments in entry-level PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0positions as a graphic designer, a production artist for a design staff, a free-lance designer, or as a junior art director. GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES ENG 101 English Composition 4.0Course No . Course Name Credits ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0APP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5 ENG 310 Advanced Interpersonal Communication 4.0APP 242 Web Page Design Principles 3.0 HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0DES 103 Illustrator Basics 3.0 HIS 300 U.S. History Since the Civil War 4.0DE 104 Photoshop 3.0 MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0DES 105 Page Layout Tools 3.0 PHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.0DES 109 Graphic Design I 3.0 PHI 221 Introduction to Logic 4.0DES 113 Typography 3.0 PSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0DES 114 Print Production and Color Theory 3.0 SOC 220 Sociology 4.0DES 209 Graphic Design II 3.0 SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0DES 240 Information Design 3.0 STA 322 Statistics 4.0DES 241 Web Design 3.0DES 242 Logo and Identity Design 3.0 TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS 183 .0DES 243 Layout Design 3.0 General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substitutedDES 244 Package Design 3.0 course is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each programDES 245 Advertising Design 3.0 contains a mathematics general education course.DES 246 Flash 3.0DES 250 Portfolio Design 3.0 Graphic ArtsDES 305 Web Portfolio Design 3.0DES 314 Advanced Color Theory 3.5DES 323 Intermediate Photoshop 3.0 Associate of Applied ScienceDES 324 Intermediate Illustrator 3.0 Length of Program: 20 Months (may be completed in as few as 15 monthsDES 336 Graphic Design III 3.0 under a flexible schedule)DES 340 Branding and Identity 3.0DES 344 Advanced Print Production 3.0 This program prepares students for an entry-level career in graphic arts. Due toDES 355 Graphic Design Business Management 3.0 the diversity of the program courses, the student will build a strong foundationDES 360 Flash Animation 3.0 in all areas required to be successful in this field: advertising design, multimediaDES 365 Flash Action Scripting 3.0 applications, Web design, marketing, and graphic design. Objectives of theDES 370 Advanced Logo Design 3.0 program are to provide the student with an integrated understanding of To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 13
    • School of Graphic Artsbusiness and design concepts and their relationship to the field of graphicarts. Graphic arts graduates work as entry-level graphic designers, Web pagedesigners and managers, and desktop publishers.Course No . Course Name CreditsAPP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5APP 242 Web Page Design Principles 3.0DES 103 Illustrator 3.0DES 104 Photoshop 3.0DES 105 Page Layout Tools 3.0DES 109 Graphic Design I 3.0DES 113 Typography 3.0DES 114 Print Production and Color Theory 3.0DES 209 Graphic Design II 3.0DES 240 Information Design 3.0DES 241 Web Design 3.0DES 242 Logo and Identity Design 3.0DES 243 Layout Design 3.0DES 244 Package Design 3.0DES 245 Advertising Design 3.0DES 246 Flash 3.0DES 250 Portfolio Design 3.0MAN 105 Marketing 4.0MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0MAN 230 Advertising Principles 4.0PSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0GENERAL EDUCATION COURSESENG 101 English Composition 4.0ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0PHI 221 Introduction to Logic 4.0SOC 220 Sociology 4.0TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS 99 .5General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substitutedcourse is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each programcontains a mathematics general education course. 14 Stevens-Henager College
    • School of Technology School of Technology Education for the Fast-changing Science of Technology Graduates of our Online Computer Science program will possess diverse, practical and theoretical knowledge that will guide the future of programming and networking in business and technology. Through the use of various learning environments, our Online Computer Science courses are enjoyable, applicable, interesting and relevant. Bachelor of Science Degree • Computer Science HIS 220 American Civilization 4.0Computer Science HIS 300 U.S. History Since the Civil War 4.0 MAT 220 College Algebra 4.0Bachelor of Science Degree PHI 310 Critical Thinking 4.036 Months (may be completed in as few as 30 months under a flexible PSY 400 Biological Psychology 4.0schedule) SOC 400 Sociology of Aging 4.0The Bachelor of Science in Computer Science is designed to graduate STA 322 Statistics 4.0a computer science professional whose diverse practical and theoreticalknowledge will guide the future of programming and networking in business Required for Emphasis in Networking:and industry. Objectives of the program are to ensure competencies at complex NET 115 Security Concepts 3.5levels of programming, network administration, database management, and NET 221 Network Communications I 3.5client interface. Computer Science graduates are employed in entry-level NET 224 Network Communications II 3.5to mid-level positions as a software engineer, network administrator, web NET 303 Principles of Storage Area Networks 3.0developer, computer programmer, project manager, systems analyst, or future NET 304 Clustering and Load Balancing 3.5entrepreneur. NET 411 Capstone 4.5 NET 424 Network Design 3.5Course No . Course Name Credits NET 425 Advanced Network Communications 3.5APP 101 Computer Fundamentals 3.5 OPS 204 Electronic Communication Management 3.5APP 126 Databases 3.5 OPS 213 Advanced Linux Operating Systems 3.5MAN 103 Management Principles 4.0 OPS 217 General Operating Systems 3.5MAN 210 Entrepreneurship 4.0 OPS 280 Advanced Server Administration 3.5MAN 223 Internet Commerce 4.0MAN 350 Management Planning Principles 4.0 Required for Emphasis in Programming:MCS 101 Computer Servicing I 3.5 PRG 105 C# I 3.0MCS 102 Computer Servicing II 3.0 PRG 310 Web Programming I 3.5MCS 213 Workstation Administration 3.5 PRG 321 C# II 3.5MCS 214 Server Administration 3.5 PRG 340 Database Administration 3.5NET 103 Basic Networking Concepts 3.5 PRG 342 Advanced Structured Query Language 3.5NET 104 Networking Infrastructure 3.5 PRG 343 Database and Software Integration 3.5OPS 101 Introduction to Operating Systems 4.0 PRG 351 Java I 3.5OPS 113 Linux Operating System 3.5 PRG 410 Web Programming II 3.5OPS 205 Security Management 3.5 PRG 411 Capstone 4.5PRG 101 Solutions Concepts 3.5 PRG 422 C++ 3.5PRG 102 Fundamentals and Concepts 3.5 PRG 441 Database Reporting 3.5PRG 103 Logic Structures 3.5 PRG 451 Java II 3.5PRG 104 Programming Fundamentals 3.0 TOTAL NUMBER OF CREDITS: 180 .0PRG 111 Web Design I 3.5PRG 140 Structured Query Language 3.5 General education courses may be substituted provided (i) the substitutedPRG 249 Web Design II 3.5 course is at the same level as the course it is replacing and (ii) each programPRG 250 Web Design III 3.0 contains a mathematics general education course.PSY 101 Psychology of Motivation 4.0PSY 299 Professional Development 4.0GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES:ECN 220 Economics 4.0ECN 221 Economic Principles 4.0ENG 101 English Composition 4.0ENG 223 Communication Arts 4.0ENG 310 Advanced Interpersonal Communication 4.0 To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 15
    • Admissions Information transcript, copy of a high school diploma, or a GED (for an Associate’s orCampus Location Bachelor’s degree), be sent to the Director of Admissions. For the Master’s programs the student needs an official transcript of a Bachelor’s degree from anSalt Lake City/Murray Online Campus accredited university or college.383 West Vine StreetMurray, UT 84123(801) 281-7600Consult our website at www.stevenshenager.edu Fully Online Student Standards The use of the following standards promotes student success. Students willFacilities experience a higher level of quality in their course work if these standardsStevens-Henager College—Salt Lake City-Murray, a branch of the Ogden- are followed.West Haven campus, is conveniently located just off I-15 in a new, four-story 1. Students must make available current contact information (includingfacility that was built especially for the campus. Restaurants and other services phone numbers) so that the course facilitator (instructor), academicare nearby. The College has five computer laboratories, two medical labs, a advisors, and administrators may make contact if needed.respiratory therapy lab, a cadaver lab, a library resource center, student lounges, 2. Online students are expected to be self-directed. Students must organizeand six lecture classrooms. Internet access is available throughout the campus. their time, plan their course assignments and projects to meet due dates,Ample parking is available. The College is handicapped-accessible. communicate well, and seek other sources beyond the textbook to meet their learning goals. 3. Students are required to logon to their courses and participate in discussionsAdmissions Information each week (see section on attendance) of the module. Students should expect an average of 10-14 hours of course activities each week for eachAdmissions Requirements 40-hour online course. Students should allow plenty of time to completeApplicants for admission to Stevens-Henager College undergraduate programs course academic requirements. The student should create a schedule andmust have graduated from an accredited high school, private secondary maintain that schedule to stay on track with his/her coursework. Consultschool, or completed the equivalent (GED). All students who graduate after the college catalog for course credits and hours.January 2006 must provide a high school transcript to check eligibility for 4. Students are to post all weekly assignments and complete all coursethe new Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG). Applicants are admitted requirements by the designated due dates in the course outline. Studentsfor enrollment on the basis of previous scholastic records as evidenced by a who have circumstances which prevent them from participating ortranscript or copy of high-school diploma, GED certificate, or Bachelor’s completing an assignment on time must communicate with the coursedegree. Previous training in business subjects is generally not required. instructor.Students seeking admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing 5. Participation in discussion forums is required. Students should reply toAdministration Program must hold a valid Registered Nurse license and instructors and other students. Postings that are of no academic value orshall have completed sufficient college credit to attain the equivalent of third substance will not be graded. Meaningful dialogue is the cornerstone ofyear college status (e.g., 60 semester credit hours or 90 quarter credit hours). online learning.Prospective students should also have completed an appropriate numberof credit hours of general education (e.g., 15 semester credit hours or 22.5 6. Students are expected to provide specific feedback in the Coursequarter credit hours). Semester hours will be converted to quarter credit hours Evaluations at the end of each course. The College welcomes candid andusing the standard formula of semester hours x 1.5 = quarter credit hours. For appropriate feedback from students.example: 3 semester hours equal 4.5 quarter credit hours. 7. Students are expected to utilize credible resources when researchingA student with prior misdemeanor or felony convictions may be subject to subjects for course papers, projects, etc. Online library resources aredenial of externships, employment opportunities, and/or professional licensure. available, including help from the College’s librarian. Students areStudents are advised that in order to comply with clinical or employment expected to use the College’s library, SHARC, whenever possible.requirements, students may be required by some hospitals or businesses to 8. Plagiarism and cheating are not tolerated.undergo a criminal background check and/or drug screening. 9. Student complaints and grievances are addressed in accordance with theMaster’s Degree complaints and grievances procedures identified in the College catalog.Applicants to the Master’s programs must have earned a baccalaureate degree Student Online Attendance Requirements and Procedures:and must provide an official transcript showing an undergraduate GPA of 2.5or higher from an institution accredited by an agency that is recognized by the 1. Students must log on the first week of the term in order to avoidU.S. Department of Education. Applicants must provide a 500 word double- termination from the course due to lack of attendance. If a student hasspaced personal statement essay on why they will be successful in a master’s only one course scheduled that term, their enrollment from school will beprogram, including a description of their career goals and their expectations terminated due to lack of attendance.upon graduation. Prospective students must demonstrate competence with 2. It is required that students log on and participate a minimum of 4 daysword processing and spreadsheets. Applicants must have internet access and per week. Students are required to participate in discussions each week ofmust successfully complete the online readiness test. In addition, the applicant the module by posting a response to the questions posted by instructors.must submit three letters of recommendation with his/her application. It is suggested that students check the threaded discussions on a daily basis to continue dialogue by responding to those who have contributedAdmissions Procedures to previous postings.Prospective students may apply online at www.stevenshenager.edu. Applicants 3. Students who are unable to meet the attendance requirements mustalso may call, fax, or write the Admissions Department to request an application. communicate immediately with the instructor. Instructors may makeTo apply for enrollment, the student submits the completed application to the provisions to accommodate students based on the circumstances. SpecialDirector of Admissions. The student should also request that a high school provisions will not be made for students who procrastinate. 16 Stevens-Henager College
    • Academic Information 4. Students not participating or logging on will be terminated from the C+ 2.4 online course. If a student has technical problems, he or she must C 2.0 Average (Minimum Passing Grade for master’s programs) communicate this problem immediately to his/her instructor and the C- 1.7 campus Dean to avoid being terminated from the course. D+ 1.4 D 1.0 PoorStudent Guidelines and Procedures for D- .7 Passing grade for AS/BS degree programsOnline Communication: F 0 Failing I *** Incomplete 1. Use inclusive language whenever communicating with others. A student PE ** Passing by exam must always communicate with best intentions and assume the same IP ** Passing (In Progress, Partial Course Completed) when someone communicates with such student. The use of emoticons P N/A Passing can be helpful. W * Withdrawal 2. Students must consistently practice excellent communication skills. Use T N/A Transfer of credits from another educational institution resources to check word usage, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. (Transfer of credits from an affiliated educational institution will result in a Strive for high quality written work in the discussion area, assignments, designation of Transfer plus the grade.) projects, exams, etc. Students are required to use complete sentences and *** Turns into F within 4 weeks of end of module if work is not appropriate capitalization. Using all caps or all lower case is unacceptable. completed for an academic grade. It is strongly suggested that students format their discussion postings in ** PE grades are issued for courses taken by exam. Both PE and IP do Word, check for grammar and spelling, then paste them in the discussion not affect the GPA calculation. area. * See Course Withdrawal section. 3. Introduction to a student’s peers in each class. Make a point to get to A grade of D- is considered the lowest passing grade for all courses. A student know someone personally and academically. Make a point to include who receives a grade in a course below a D- must retake the course. The excep- someone who appears to be “sitting on the sidelines.” Ask for his or her tion to this policy is the master’s programs. opinion and promote meaningful discussion. The grade point average (GPA) is calculated as follows: 4. If an instructor does not respond to a student’s communication within 24 to 48 hours, assume there is a technical problem. 1. For each course taken, the number of quality points assigned to the grade earned is multiplied by the number of credits received for the course.The Online Student Handbook has a complete and detailed explanation of allfacets of the online delivery method and is available online. 2. All accumulated quality points are added together. 3. This total is divided by the total number of credit hours the student has attempted. Minus courses withdrawn from.Academic Information Courses in which a student received a failing grade (F, 0 quality points) are included in the total number of credit hours attempted and affect the GPA.Attendance Passing GradesYour most crucial responsibility and the main factor leading to academicand career success is attending all classes. Because you are participating in A PE grade may be earned as a result of taking a course challenge examinationan online learning environment, attendance is measured differently. You are and passing with 90% or better. GPA is not affected by PE grades. Financialrequired to complete all daily or weekly assignments. Assignments may consist aid cannot be issued for the grade of PE.of completing coursework, but learning activities such as attending threaded The notation of IP (In Progress, Passing) will be posted for students who havediscussions and communicating or sending assignments to your instructor obtained passing grades at the end of the first month of a two-month course.or team members via email is calculated as attendance. Therefore, you need An IP grade is a placeholder for partial courses and is not part of the GPAto make the commitment that you will attend to such communications. calculation since a grade is not earned until the end of the two month course.Remember you need to participate in your course at least 4 days per week. Satisfactory progress and successful course completion is not affected by the PE grade or the IP grade.Equipment for Student UseEquipment and training aids that are available to students include, but are not Grade Reportslimited to, the following: The students can print a report of their grades electronically through the student • Online resource library containing over 120,000 articles and related materials portal. For purposes of academic progress and graduation, the cumulative GPA • Current industry periodicals from the student transcript is used. • Professional software for training Course Withdrawal • Laptops. Upon academic and financial clearance, all new undergraduate A student who withdraws from a course receives a grade of W. A student may students receive a laptop to use during their program and may keep it officially withdraw by Friday of the first week of the module. All courses with when they graduate at no additional charge. a final grade of W are considered attempted credits and will be charged tuition accordingly. Title IV monies including PELL and SEOG will be awarded forGrading System courses given a grade of W.Grade Points Explanation Since a grade of W is counted as credit hours attempted but not completed,A 4.0 Excellent it will adversely affect a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SeeA- 3.7 Standards of Satisfactory Progress). A grade of W does not affect the student’sB+ 3.4 cumulative GPA.B 3.0 Very GoodB- 2.7 A grade of W may only be issued in the following circumstances: To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 17
    • Academic Information • A student has attended at least one day of the class during the first week of Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 the module and then formally withdraws with the Registrar before the end 150% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 of the first week of the module. Bachelor’s Degree Program • A student has attended beyond the first week of the module, is in good End of the first academic year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 standing (good attendance and passing grades), and is forced to withdraw End of the second academic year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 due to extenuating circumstances which are limited to verified medical End of the third academic year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 problems (either with the student or his/her immediate family, military End of the fourth academic year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 obligations, jury duty, or death in the family that causes extended hard- End of each academic year until 150% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 ship. If a student attends beyond the first week of the module and then Associate’s Degree Program withdraws for reasons other than those listed above, a grade of F will be 25% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.0 issued. An F grade academically lowers the student’s grade point average 50% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 and adversely affects the student’s academic progress. Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 150% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0Program WithdrawalStudents who find it necessary to withdraw from a program must have an in- Academic Probationterview with the Dean of Education or Registrar. The student is also required To ensure a student’s success in a program, grades are reviewed by the Dean atto have an exit interview with a representative of the Financial Aid department. the end of each evaluation point. If a student is in danger of falling below theThis is the date of determination. If a student provides notice of withdrawal required standards of progress, the student is advised. A student is placed onin writing, the date on which the notice is mailed with appropriate postage probation if he or she fails to meet either or both the maximum time frameis the date of determination. When a student does not contact the school to and the cumulative GPA at the evaluation points. If a student fails to meet thewithdraw, the date of determination is the second Monday when the student minimum requirements at the end of the next evaluation point the studentceased logging into class. will be placed on a second probationary period or may be dismissed. Appeal of dismissal is made to the Campus Director, and the Campus Director’s deci-Dismissal sion is final. A student may stay on probation until such time that the studentStudent termination may result from unsatisfactory academic progress, unsat- exceeds both the maximum time frame and the cumulative GPA requirements,isfactory course completion, failure to achieve the appropriate proficiency level at which time the student will be taken off probation. If it is determined thatwithin the prescribed time frame, conduct detrimental to the College, failure the student cannot meet either the cumulative GPA or the maximum timeto comply with financial aid regulations, or non-observance of other student frame requirements, the student will be dismissed and is not allowed re-entryregulations. A student who is dismissed may appeal to the President/Executive to the College.Director of the College, who will make the final determination. While on probation, a student receives tutoring and regular academic assess- ment and is urged to apply him or herself to once again attain satisfactoryReadmission academic progress.Readmission to Stevens-Henager College following dismissal or withdrawalwill be at the sole discretion of the College. Students whose enrollment has Financial Aid Probationbeen terminated may petition the President/Executive Director in writing for Students are eligible for Title IV funding during the first Academic Probation.reinstatement. The written request should contain a summary of why the stu- If the student is not successful in regaining Satisfactory Academic Progressdent feels he or she should be readmitted. The President/Executive Director standards by the next evaluation point, his or her financial aid will be sus-shall review all requests on a case-by-case basis. Extenuating circumstances will pended. The student has seven days to appeal the suspension. If the studentbe taken into consideration. However, Stevens-Henager College reserves the is successful in improving completion of courses within the maximum timeright to refuse to readmit any student who does not meet the College’s aca- frame and cumulative GPA to the minimum requirement at the next evalu-demic or behavioral standards. ation period, or an appeal is approved, financial aid may be reinstated. The appeal for mitigating circumstances must be made in writing by the student,Maximum Time Frame and the decision of the Campus Director is final. However, if the student does not appeal or an appeal is not approved, and the suspension of financial aid re-Students must complete their program within one and one half times the mains in force, the student may self-pay for tuition and expenses subject to thecredit hours required to complete the program. Students must complete 67% requirements of Academic Probation until such time the student meets eitherof their credits attempted in each evaluation period in order to complete the or both the maximum time frame or the cumulative GPA requirements withinprogram within the maximum time frame. the maximum time frame and financial aid can be reinstated.Satisfactory Academic Progress Measurements Satisfactory Progress VerificationStudents must progress satisfactorily toward meeting graduation requirements. When financial aid electronic disbursement rosters are received, the financialThe academic progress of each student will be reviewed at the required evalu- aid officer at Central Financial Aid (CFA) quickly checks that the student isation points below and at least once every academic year after the first. An eligible for the disbursement. If the student does not have the required timeacademic year is defined as two terms of four modules each, or 32 weeks. At and credits, it is documented on the student’s academic record. The Directoreach evaluation point, the student must have completed 67% of the credits of Financial Aid at CFA is fully responsible and accountable for verifying andattempted. A student’s progress toward graduation is considered satisfactory if documenting that the student is entitled to the funds by checking the requiredthe following minimum GPA requirements are met. time and credits correlating to satisfactory progress.Evaluation Point: Required Minimum GPA with 67% of Credits Attempted Com-pleted Standards of Progress for VeteransMaster’s Degree Program Veterans or eligible persons are evaluated monthly to determine satisfactory25% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 progress. A veteran or eligible person whose grade point average falls below 2.050% of the program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 will be placed on probation for unsatisfactory progress and shall be terminated 18 Stevens-Henager College
    • Academic Informationif his or her GPA remains below 2.0 at the end of the next grading period. If Stevens-Henager College does not replace grades when a course is repeated.the veteran or eligible person is allowed to remain on probation beyond this Each attempt at the course is recorded on the student’s transcript and bothperiod, he or she will have all veterans’ benefits discontinued. grades are reflected in the cumulative GPA. Each attempt at the course would be counted as a “course attempted” in the calculations for successful courseAppeal completion and maximum time frame. Repeating a course in a program will result in the assessment of tuition charges at the current credit hour rate.A student has the right to appeal a determination that he or she is not makingsatisfactory progress. The appeal must be in writing and should be submittedto the dean within seven days of the unsatisfactory progress determination. The Graduation Requirements and Awardsdecision of the dean is final. To be eligible for graduation, students must meet the following requirements: 1. Pass with a D- grade or higher all core and non-core courses (except for mas-Extenuating Circumstances ter’s programs, in which all master’s courses must be passed with at least a 2.0).The College may waive interim satisfactory standards for extenuating circum- 2. Attain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (3.0 for Master’s students).stances. Circumstances must be documented, and it must be demonstrated bythe student that such mitigating circumstances have had an adverse impact on 3. Pass the number of credit hours required for the program within thesatisfactory progress. Documentation is provided to financial aid when approv- maximum time frame.ing such a student to continue receiving financial aid funds. 4. Satisfy all financial obligations. 5. Complete a financial aid exit.Reestablishing Eligibility for Federal FundsIf a student is allowed to return to the college after being dismissed for unsat- Degrees Grantedisfactory progress, she/he may reenter and must meet the above requirementsbefore receiving Title IV aid. The student must make financial arrangements Upon fulfillment of the graduation requirements, the student will be issuedwith the college to pay for courses while reestablishing eligibility for federal the appropriate degree, indicating satisfactory completion and passing of allfunds. Once the student has met the requirements listed above, Title IV aid program requirements. Stevens-Henager College offers programs leading towill be reinstated. If the student does not meet the satisfactory progress require- an Associate of Applied Science degree, a Bachelor of Science degree, and aments during the probationary period of one academic year, she/he will be Master’s degree.dismissed from the college. Graduation HonorsIncompletes A student may graduate with honors as follows:Incomplete grades are counted as credits attempted and affect maximum time • Summa Cum Laude for graduating with a 4.0 cumulative GPA.frame, but do not affect the grade point average. An incomplete (I) grade may • Magna Cum Laude for graduating with a cumulative GPA between 3.8be issued to a student who is passing a course but who has not completed and 3.99.all required work. The student will be allowed four weeks to complete thecoursework. When the coursework is completed, a grade will be issued for the • Cum Laude for graduating with a cumulative GPA between 3.50course. If the work is not completed during the allotted time, the incomplete and 3.79.(I) will revert to an “F.” When calculating the GPA for purposes of determiningsatisfactory progress, an incomplete (I) is equivalent to an “F.” The student ac- Schedulingcumulates no quality points for the course, but the number of credits assigned Courses are scheduled so that students should be able to complete all programto the course is included in the total number of credit hours attempted. If requirements on time unless the student fails courses, fails to achieve core re-the incomplete prevents a student from meeting graduation requirements, the quirements, or withdraws and re-enters. Students with transfer credits may ex-student will be eligible for employment assistance services. If the incomplete is perience disruptions in their schedule. If any of these circumstances occur, thenot resolved within the allotted time period, however, the student will forfeit College will make every effort to schedule the student with a full schedule eachfuture use of the College’s employment assistance services and will not be is- module; however, courses will not be scheduled simply to facilitate the studentsued a degree. who has interrupted his/her schedule. Students are urged to do everything pos- sible not to interrupt their schedule.Occupational StandardsThe college must terminate any student who is unable to satisfactorily achieve Credit Transfer from Another Collegethe knowledge and skills required by the occupation for which the training Credits from other institutions which are accredited by an agency recognizedis intended. by the U.S. Department of Education may transfer when the course submit- ted for consideration is of comparable scope and content to the campus’s ownPrerequisite Courses courses. International credits will be reviewed on an individual basis. TransferIf a student fails a course that is a prerequisite for another course, the student of credit is at the judgment and discretion of the Dean and/or the Campusmust successfully complete the course before continuing in the program. If a Director. The maximum transfer credits allowable from other institutions are:student fails a course that is not a prerequisite for another course, the student To associate’s degree programs: No more than 25% of the credits may bemay continue in the program and repeat the course at a later date, provided transferred. Tuition will be adjusted accordingly. Transferred credits must bethat the maximum time frame standards are not exceeded. C- or better. Core technical courses must be earned within the past 8 years, and general education courses have no time limit.Course Repetitions To a bachelor’s degree program (not bachelor’s completion degree pro-Stevens-Henager College programs are not designed to facilitate course repeti- grams): No more than 50% of the credits may be transferred. Tuition will betions due to the short, fast-paced, and intense nature of the coursework. If a adjusted accordingly. Transferred credits must be C- or better. Core coursesstudent fails a course or earns a grade in a course below a “D-”, that course must be earned within the past 8 years, and general education courses have nocould be repeated, provided it is offered again within the maximum time time limit.frame. The President/Executive Director must approve all course repetitions. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 19
    • Academic InformationTo master’s degree programs (from other accredited master’s degree pro- Credit Transfer to Other Collegesgrams): No more than 25% of the credits may be transferred. Tuition willbe adjusted accordingly. Transferred credits must be B- or better and will be Graduates or students who are considering transferring from the college toaccepted as long as the degree was earned from an accredited institution. Ap- other institutions should recognize that programs at the college are specificallyplicants enrolling into the master’s degree program must have earned a bacca- tailored to career preparation. Courses that make up such programs are notlaureate degree in an associated field which will be recognized as long as it was generally transferable to other colleges, particularly in programs that emphasizeearned from an accredited institution whose accrediting agency is recognized general or liberal education. It should also be noted that in any transfer situ-by the U.S. Department of Education. There is no time limit for bachelor’s ation, regardless of the colleges involved, the acceptance of credits is at thedegrees which are applied to the master’s program. All transferred core courses sole discretion of the accepting college, and this college makes no repre-must be earned within the past 8 years. sentations whatsoever concerning the transferability of any college credits to any other institution. The college credits generally are not transferable toTransfer Credit Process other colleges unless a written articulation agreement between the college andThe applicant must supply a college syllabus, catalog, or course description and another institution has been negotiated. See the director of admissions or thean official transcript(s) for transfer of credit to occur. Campus Director for details of any articulation agreements.Course NumberingGenerally, 100- and 200-level courses are for associate’s-level work, 300- and Credit Transfer for Veterans400-level courses are for bachelor’s-level work, and 500- and 600-level courses The College maintains a written record of the previous education and trainingare for master’s-level work. In transferring in credits, no 100- and 200-lev- of veterans or eligible persons. No more than 25% of a transfer student’s priorel courses may be used to satisfy our 300- and 400- or 500- and 600-level academic work will be accepted towards a degree, with the training periodcourses. However, 300- and 400- or 500- and 600-level courses for another shortened proportionately. The veteran or eligible person will be notified ofaccredited institution may be used to satisfy 100- and 200-level courses at our prior credit granted.institution if the course descriptions are similar.Course Credits Credit by ExaminationA sufficient number of credits earned from the transferring institution must Students may wish to challenge out of a course by taking a competency ex-equal the credits we grant for a course. Example: a sociology course transferred amination. To successfully pass a challenge exam the student must score 90%to us must be 4 quarter credits or 3 semester credits to satisfy our sociology or better on the final test. The college may award credit to students who passcourse requirements. (Semester credits x 1.5 = quarter credits). the college challenge exam in a specific course. The student must challenge theTranscript course and the test must be completed and scored before or during the first dayGrades of transferred courses from other institutions (must be C and higher) of the module. Credit received will be treated similar to transfer credit (with aare recorded as a “P” grade and do not contribute to quality points in calculat- grade of PE being assigned to the course). Tuition adjustment will not be madeing the student’s cumulative GPA at our college. for Pass by Examination.Continuing Education Units/Seminars The notation of IP (In Progress, Passing) will be posted for students who haveCredits for Continuing Education Units (CEUs) or seminars may not be trans- obtained passing grades at the end of the first month of a two-month course.ferred to satisfy courses at our college. A student who has continuing education An IP grade is a placeholder for partial courses and is not part of the GPAunits and/or seminars in courses scheduled in the student’s program, may chal- calculation since a grade is not earned until the end of the two-month course.lenge the course by passing the examination with a score of 90% or greater. If Satisfactory progress and successful course completion is not affected by the PEthe student passes the examination, the student will receive a grade of PE on grade or the IP grade.his or her transcript.CLEP, DANTES, AP, and Certification Credit Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974The college may award credit to students who score at or above established In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, whichlevels on College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), Defense Activities became law on November 19, 1974, Stevens-Henager College hereby notifiesfor Non-traditional Education Support (DANTES) examinations, Advanced all students of their rights in connection with educational records maintainedPlacement (AP), and college recognized certifications (i.e., Cisco, Microsoft, by the College. All students are entitled to review their educational recordsA+, etc.). Some core courses may not be transferable (i.e., medical clinical core maintained by the College by making a request to the President. Within forty-courses). Information regarding specific CLEP, DANTES, and AP equivalents/ five (45) days after the request is made, the educational records of the studentscores may be obtained from the Dean or Campus Director. Tuition is adjusted will be made available to the student. If the student believes that informationaccordingly. in the educational records is inaccurate or misleading or violates the privacy or other rights of the student, the student may request that the College amend theCredit Transfer from Affiliated Colleges records. If the College refuses to amend the educational records of the student,Graduates or students who are transferring within the affiliated college system the College will inform the student of the right to a hearing to seek the correc-will have their credits automatically accepted. Graduates of associate’s degree tion of information in the educational records. At the hearing, the student willprograms within the affiliated college system may transfer credits to an appli- be afforded an opportunity to present evidence that is relevant to the issues,cable full bachelor’s degree, not a bachelor’s completion degree. The same grade and the student may be assisted or represented by an individual of his or herrequirements as for students transferring credits from outside the system apply. choice at his or her own expense, including an attorney.When a student transfers from one affiliated campus to another, grades, grade The decision of the College shall be based solely upon the evidence presented atpoint averages (GPA), and satisfactory academic progress (SAP) status transfer the hearing. If, as a result of the hearing, the student believes that the informa-with the student. In other words, if a student is on academic probation and trans- tion is not accurate, is misleading, or otherwise is in violation of the privacyfers from one campus to another, the student will remain on academic probation. or other rights of the student, the student has the right to place in the educa-Likewise, a student who transfers from one campus to another with a GPA that tional records a statement commenting upon the information in the educationwarrants honor status will retain that status at his or her new campus. records and/or setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the College. 20 Stevens-Henager College
    • Financial Information Cancelling Enrollment Prior to Starting ClassFinancial Information If you are not accepted into the College, the enrollment agreement will beTuition and Fees cancelled, and we will refund all money paid within 30 days. You may cancelNo out-of-state tuition requirements apply. A $75 deposit is required of all the enrollment agreement within three business days and receive a full refundhigh school students enrolling in the College. The deposit will be applied to of all money paid within 30 days. If you have not visited the College priorthe tuition charges and is nonrefundable. to enrollment, you may withdraw without penalty within three business days following a tour of the college facilities and inspection of equipment whereBeginning July 5, 2010, tuition charges for all new students who start classes your education services will be provided. You will also receive a full refundand for all existing students who have been enrolled in the college since March within 30 days if your educational services are discontinued or your starting2007 will range from $320 to $518 per quarter credit. Tuition for associate’s date is postponed by more than 90 days. The enrollment agreement maydegree programs will be $39,400.00. Tuition for bachelor’s degree programs be terminated by the College for unsatisfactory academic progress, use ofwill be $69,445.00. Tuition for RN to BS Nursing Administration will be controlled substances on campus, conduct detrimental to the College, failure$29,420.00. Tuition for the RN to BS Nursing degree will be $39,400. to comply with financial aid regulations or non-observance of other studentTuition for master’s degrees will be $27,106.00. Tuition for BS Health Science regulations. If you are dismissed, you may appeal to the Campus Director ofdegree is $29,420. Students enrolled fully online programs are responsible for the College, whose decision will be final.purchasing all books.Students can expect the College to increase tuition at least once during any Cancellation After Classes Have Startedcalendar year. Refund calculations are complex. For further information and You may cancel enrollment for any reason up until the end of the seventh dayexamples, read the catalog, and visit our Financial Aid office. past the start date. College will refund any monies paid minus the registration fee and an administrative fee of $150. Thereafter, you may terminate yourTuition enrollment by giving written notice to the college (fax, e-mail, or mail) atAll students must make payment arrangements with the Financial Aid Office anytime. Such notice is effective once the college receives the notice. Thein advance of attending classes. All payment arrangements for an unpaid bal- written notice of cancellation need not take any particular form, and howeverance must be made with the Financial Aid Office at the end of the student’s expressed, is effective if it shows you no longer wish to be bound by theprogram. The student must be credit-worthy to qualify for private-market enrollment agreement.loans. For those students who qualify for Federal Financial Aid, electronic pay-ments are ordered by Central Financial Aid on the dates students qualify for Refund Policytheir funds. Students are counseled about repayment of financial aid during the Institutional charges upon withdrawal or termination during the first termmandatory entrance and exit interview. If an amount is due at the time the of the first academic year:student graduates or withdraws, the balance is due in full at that time unlesssatisfactory payment arrangements have been made with the Financial Aid Of- 1. If you terminate after midnight of the seventh calendar day after the datefice. If the student fails to make a payment within 30 days of the due date, the you first login, but before completing more than 10% of the term, youbalance will be due in full and the account will be turned over to a collections are responsible for 10% of the tuition and a $150.00 administrative fee.agency. The student agrees to pay any collection fees up to and including court 2. If you terminate after completing more than 10% of the term but lesscosts and reasonable attorney fees. Cash discounts are not given for early pay- than 25%, you are responsible for 25% of the term’s tuition and ament of fees or tuition. If a student has a balance, a hold will be placed on his/ $150.00 administrative fee.her account and diplomas or official transcripts will not be released. 3. If you terminate after completing more than 25% of the term but lessFunding Tuition than 50%, you are responsible for 50% of the tuition and a $150.00 administrative fee.A variety of financial plans are available for those students who qualify forfinancial aid. These plans include a combination of student loans, grants, 4. If you terminate enrollment after completing more than 50% of thescholarships, and payment plans. The variety of available plans affords term but less than 75%, you are responsible for 75% of the tuition and aflexibility in choosing the one best suited for a specific need. The college offers $150.00 administrative fee.individual financial planning sessions for each student and family. The college 5. If you terminate enrollment after completing more than 75% of the term,participates in the Title IV Federal Financial Aid Program that includes Federal you are responsible for all tuition and fees.Pell Grants, Federal ACG and SMART grants, Federal Stafford Subsidizedor Unsubsidized Loans, Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Study, the Institutional charges upon withdrawal or termination during any subse-Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, and the Federal Direct quent term:Student Lending program. All students must have an appointment with the 1. If you terminate during the first 25% of the term, you are responsible forFinance Department prior to starting school to arrange payment of tuition. 25% of the tuition and a $150.00 administrative fee.Prospective students may request a Student Financial Aid Guide, a Financial 2. If you terminate after completing more than 25% of the term but lessAid Consumer Information packet and other pertinent information and forms than 50%, you are responsible for 50% of the tuition and a $150.00from the Finance Department. Private loans, scholarships, and electronic administrative fee.tuition payments are available to students to cover the cost of tuition. 3. If you terminate after completing more than 50% of the term but lessIf a student obtains a loan to pay for an educational program, the student will than 75%, you are responsible for 75% of the tuition and a $150.00have the responsibility to repay the full amount of the loan plus interest, less administrative fee.the amount of any refund. With credit-based loans, a student may elect tomake interest-only payments while in college. The interest rate is based on the 4. If you terminate after completing more than 75% of the term, you areindividual’s credit rating. Payments are sent directly to the school. responsible for all tuition and fees.Note: Any holder of a consumer credit contract is subject to all claims and defenses, Return of Title IV Fundswhich the debtor could assert against the seller of goods or services, obtainedpursuant hereto or with the proceeds hereof. Recovery hereunder by the debtor shall If a student receives Title IV student financial assistance (Federal Pell Grants,not exceed amounts paid by the debtor (FTC Rule effective 5/14/1976). Federal Supplemental Grants, Federal Family Education Loans, ACG or To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 21
    • Financial InformationSMART grants), special rules apply when a student withdraws or is terminated. Sample Refund PoliciesThese rules are independent of the institution’s refund policy. Thus, there maybe cases where the institution is required by the government to return Title For example: Assume that a first time enrollment student enrolled in a pro-IV funds even though such funds are needed to pay the student’s institutional gram and was charged $150 in fees. The student’s start date for the term wascharges. In all cases, the student remains responsible for paying institutional 1/5/09 with an end date of 4/26/09. The start of the second module was 2/2/09charges as determined by the refund policy. For the purpose of determining in which the student attended four days of the module, and then stopped at-the amount you owe for the time you attended, you shall be deemed to have tending. The student did not come back the next (3rd) module and the schoolwithdrawn from a course when any of the following occurs: terminated enrollment on the 2nd Monday of the 3rd module for nonatten- dance the first week of the 3rd module. The student’s loans and grants were a. You notify the college of your withdrawal in writing, or fully disbursed for the term. PELL was recalculated and unearned funds were b. The college terminates you. returned. See the calculations below.Refunds will be paid within 45 days from the date of determination. Any credit Refund Calculation Examplegranted for the prior education or training shall not impact this refund policy. Institutional Calculation:Refund calculations are complex. For further information and examples, readthe catalog and visit the College’s Financial Aid Office. i. Loan Funds disbursed = $4,750.00 ii. Amount Earned by the Student (100%) = $4,750.00Earning and Returning Title IV Funds iii. PELL Funds received for Full Time = $1,000.00Special rules apply for withdrawals of certain Title IV federal student aid re-cipients. (Title IV aid includes Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Op- iv. Amount Earned by the Student (8 credits attempted: ¼ time) = $250.00portunity Grants, Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans.): If a stu- v. Total Unearned (returned) = $750.00dent officially withdraws or is terminated by the institution, the date that thisoccurs will be used to calculate both refunds and the return of Title IV Funds vi. Student Tuition charged = $8,500.00(if the latter is necessary). If a student stops attending and makes no formal Less: 25% Tuition Refund = $2,125.00withdrawal request, the date of determination will be used in all withdrawal vii. Plus Administrative Fees = $150.00calculations as the last date of the student’s obligation. The date of determina-tion will be the second Monday of the module following when the student viii. Total Tuition and Fees earned by College = $6,525.00ceased attending classes. ix. Funds Retained by College = $5,000.00Undergraduate programs use a modules-within-terms for Financial Aid. Each x. Balance Due College by Student = $1,525.00term, which is equivalent to a semester, consists of four modules. Refund calculations are complex. For further information and examples, readWithin any term, a student who completes at least one module is considered the catalog and contact our financial aid office.to have completed the term, and the Federal Return of Title IV FFEL Fundsregulations do not apply. For any Federal Pell Grant recipient who withdraws Scholarshipsfrom school at any time, however, the student’s grant may have to be reduced Academic Scholarships will be awarded to high school seniors. Students mustfrom full time to a status that is less than full time, depending on how many enroll and start classes no later than December 31 after their graduation fromcredits the student started. If the student started 18 credits, or more, in the high school. Scores on the Otis Lennon test must be as follows:term, no reduction is necessary. If the student started 13.5 credits, but less than18 credits, the Pell Grant is reduced to 3/4 time. If the student started 9 credits, 1. Applicants who score >34 $7,000but less than 13.5 credits, the Pell Grant is reduced to 1/2 time. If the student 2. Applicants who score >46 $7,500started less than 9 credits, the Pell Grant is reduced to less than 1/2 time. Inall cases, once any such adjustment of the Pell Grant has been made, the insti- 3. Applicants who score >58 $8,000tutional refund policy will be applied. If a student withdraws during the first A high school senior graduating with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher on hismodule of a term without completing that module, the student’s Pell Grant, if or her high school transcript is exempt from testing. The award is up to $5,000any, will be reduced as indicated above, and then the Federal Return of Title for the first academic year and $3,000 for the second academic year. The stu-IV Funds policy will be applied to the remaining amount of Federal Student dent must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA with 90% attendance in order toAid that was disbursed or could have been disbursed. The amount the student retain the scholarship. Students should be aware that scholarships awardedhas earned is based on a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of days to them are not applied to their financial account until they have completedthe student was carried on the rolls from the beginning of the term until the the first and second academic years. Students are notified of the exam throughdate of determination, and the denominator of which is the number of days in their high school counselor’s office or by letter to the students’ residence. Allthe term, including weekends and holidays but not including any break of five students are invited to visit the College for an admissions interview and a tourdays or more. This fraction is then multiplied by the dollar amount of Federal of the College at any time prior to the event. Any high school senior whoStudent Aid which was disbursed or could have been disbursed, to arrive and will graduate in the same school year as the scholarship examinations for thatthe dollar amount of Federal Student Aid the student has earned. The school school year is eligible. All scholarships cannot be transferred and have no cashwill then return to the Federal government the amount that the student did value. If a student withdraws before completing an academic year, the scholar-not earn, will apply the institutional refund policy, and will bill the student for ship may not be awarded and arrangements will need to be made to reimburseany amount the student owes the school. the College. The total award range for this scholarship is $7,000 to $8,000. Legacy Grants will be awarded for 10% of the tuition remaining after transfer of credits if an applicant enrolls in a program offered by the College. The fol- lowing criteria apply: 1. The Legacy Grant only applies to applicants who are immediate fam- ily members (father, mother, son, daughter,brother, sister, stepchildren, spouses, and grandparents/grandchildren) of either a graduate or a cur- rently enrolled student in good standing (3.0 or above cumulative GPA with 90% attendance). 22 Stevens-Henager College
    • Student Services 2. The grant is applied at the end of the program. The matching funds will be posted to the student’s account when funds are 3. A student may share the value of the grant up to half of its value with a received by the school up to the maximum limit. In the event that students family member enrolling at the same time. transfer in credits to the College, the matching funds allowance will be reduced proportionally.Every subsequent enrolling family member is granted the Legacy Grant in anamount representing 10% of tuition. General Qualifications for all of the listed scholarships are as follows: stu- dents must meet all admissions and financial requirements of the College for 4. The student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and 90% atten- enrollment, students must attend 90% of all classes the first academic year, dance. and students must maintain a minimum GPA as stipulated by the scholarship 5. The grant may not be combined with other college scholarships or grants. awarded. Scholarships listed above may not be combined with other college scholarships. All scholarship recipients must file a FAFSA and meet all ad- 6. The grant applies to tuition only and does not result in a cash payment to missions and financial requirements of the College for initial and continued the student or the student’s immediate family member. This grant is not enrollment. All scholarships are non-transferable and apply to tuition only and transferable to non-family members and is a waiver of tuition. will not result in a cash payment to students.Presidential Scholarships are awarded each year. Each campus administers All scholarships and grants are waivers of tuition. The number of qualified ap-the scholarship examination at high schools throughout its region. The student plicants determines the total amount awarded in any academic year.in each region with the highest score on the Scholarship Examination who alsoachieves the highest ACT score (minimum 24) will be awarded one full tuitionscholarship to the college in that region. Students are notified of the eventthrough their high school counselor’s office or by letter to the students’ resi- Student Servicesdence. Students are invited to visit the College for an admissions interview anda tour of the College any time prior to the event. Any high school senior who Tutoringwill graduate in the same school year as the scholarship examinations for that We offer tutoring for all students, at no extra cost. Tutoring information isschool year is eligible. Students who are awarded the Presidential Scholarship posted inside each course. SHC Online offers many forms of tutoring directedmust maintain a 3.8 cumulative GPA throughout their studies with at least by mentors, instructors, teaching assistants, and other staff.94% attendance. Scholarships are not applied to students’ financial accountuntil they have completed their exit interview with the Financial Planner. If a Advisingstudent withdraws from the College prior to graduation, the scholarship will Advising is an important service at Stevens-Henager College. Each studentnot be applied to that student’s account. If no scholarship applicant achieves an is provided with a academic advisor who will provide guidance and answerACT score of 24 or higher, the scholarship will not be awarded. This scholar- questions. Academic advisors may enlist the expertise of online dean, associateship may not be combined with other College scholarships. deans, financial aid, and online director.G.I.F.T. Scholarships [Utah only] are awarded in an amount equal to 10%of the tuition for an academic year to the student with the highest GPA, in Career Servicesconjunction with the Utah State Office of Hispanic Affairs’ Hispanic Gover- Graduates of Stevens-Henager College are entitled to use the services of thenor’s Initiative on Families. Today (G.I.F.T.) Annual Conference. The eligible Career Services Office at no additional charge throughout their careers. Thestudent will be chosen from the G.I.F.T Young Achievers recipients. The stu- College does not guarantee employment but can provide contacts, interviews,dent receiving the scholarship must maintain a 3.0 GPA and 90% attendance and guidance during the career services process. The Career Services Office isin order to remain eligible for the scholarship. Credit for the scholarship will not a resume-writing service but can provide models from which a studentbe applied at the end of the first academic year. A student may utilize only one may write his/her own resume. Graduates experiencing difficulty in securingscholarship or tuition waiver. employment may wish to retake one or more courses at the College, to updateMatching Funds: Matching funds are available for students employed by an professional skills, employment techniques, grooming, and social interaction.organization that reimburses its employees for educational costs. A student Stevens-Henager College reserves the right to deny career services for conductis eligible for matching funds only after providing written evidence that the significantly detrimental to the integrity of the college, such as failure to passstudent is being reimbursed for educational costs during the time frame in a drug test, being fired from previous employment for illegal or immoral actswhich he/she is an active student at the College. A student whose status with or any acts against company policy or as a result of a felony investigation orthe College is active or graduate and who is employed by the organization conviction. Candidates for career services must be proficient in the skills as-shall receive an amount of up to $5,000 for associate’s degrees or bachelor’s sociated with their career. The candidate must also present a professional imagecompletion degrees, up to $10,000 for bachelor’s degrees, and up to $3,000 for and employment records with no discharges for causes noted above. Graduatesmaster’s degrees, provided such funds are extended to qualified students in lieu who want to update their skills in order to use career services may retake classesof any other College-sponsored discount or scholarship. The matching funds at no charge.allowance will not exceed the tuition reimbursement award of the employerand the maximum limit established by the College. The matching funds will be A graduate requesting career services after a significant period of time awayposted to the student’s account when funds are received by the school up to the from the College must be current in vocational skills aligned with the programmaximum limit. In the event that students transfer in credits to the College, in which he/she graduated from the College. Examples of current skills includethe matching funds allowance will be reduced proportionally. Matching funds current software training, professional image, and good employment recordsare available for students or individuals employed by any branch of the United with no discharges for cause as noted above.States Armed Forces that reimburses its active duty personnel for educationalcosts. A student whose status with the College is active or graduate and who Library - SHARCis employed by the United States Armed Forces shall receive an amount of up The Stevens-Henager Advanced Resource Center is available for students atto $5,000 for an associate’s degree or a bachelor’s completion degree and up to any time. Library databases, web resources, learning labs, e-books, and tutor-$10,000 for a bachelor’s degree, provided such funds are extended to qualified ing are available 24/7.students in lieu of any other College-sponsored discount or scholarship. Thematching funds allowance will not exceed the tuition reimbursement awardof the U.S. Armed Forces and the maximum limit established by the College. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 23
    • Student ServicesOrientation Step One: Any and all disputes, conflicts, problems, controversies, or claims of any kind without exception arising from or connected to enrollment and at-Students must complete an online orientation to ANGEL and an Online tendance at the College (“dispute”) should first be taken up with the CampusReadiness test. Director. If the dispute is not then resolved, a written statement should be made of each party’s position and submitted to the Corporate Chief ExecutiveSexual Harassment Officer for a final decision. The parties may proceed to Step Two if the disputeSexual harassment is an offense. Sexual harassment is defined as any unwel- is not resolved in Step One.come advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct Step Two: The parties agree that any dispute should be first attempted to beof a sexual nature. If a student or employee has been the victim of any sexual resolved through mediation. Any such mediation will be held in Salt Lake City,offense, including sexual harassment, during a College-related activity, the of- Utah, and any party may choose to appear by telephone or by videocast. Thefense must be reported at once to the President or administrator in charge. An parties agree to attend and make a sincere and good faith effort to resolve theinvestigation will be conducted. dispute through this mediation.Copyrighted Materials Policy and Sanctions Step Three: Jury Waiver and Agreement to Binding, Individual ArbitrationUnauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, including peer-to-peer file Both parties forever waive rights to a trial by jury, and elect instead to submit allsharing and the unauthorized use of the College’s information and its technol- disputes (claims) to the binding, confidential decision of a single arbitrator. Atogy systems may subject a student to civil and criminal liabilities and penalties the student’s election, the arbitration shall be conducted by the Better Businessof federal copyright laws. Bureau (“BBB”) or by the American Arbitration Association (“AAA”) under its Supplementary Procedures for Consumer-Related Disputes (“ConsumerStudents engaging in unauthorized use of copyrighted materials, including Rules”). The arbitration conducted under this agreement shall be governed bypeer-to-peer file sharing, illegal downloading or unauthorized distribution of the Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. § 1, et seq. Utah substantive law shall becopyrighted materials using the school’s information technology system may applied to the proceeding, except to the extent federal substantive law wouldface termination from the institution. In addition, the student may face crimi- apply to any claim. The arbitration shall be conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah,nal penalties as summarized below. This list is not all-inclusive, and the student and any party may choose to appear by telephone or by videocast. Both partiesneeds to be aware of the severe sanctions because of violating these policies. agree that each provision is severable from this Arbitration Agreement and thatCopyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission or legal all other terms shall remain in force.authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the copyright owner Terms of Arbitrationunder section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of the United States Code).These rights include the right to reproduce or distribute a copyrighted work. 1. Neither party shall file any lawsuit against the other in any court andIn the file-sharing context, downloading or uploading substantial parts of a agree that any suit filed in violation of this provision shall be promptlycopyrighted work without authority constitutes an infringement. dismissed by the court in favor of an arbitration conducted pursuant to this provision. Both parties agree that the party enforcing arbitration shallPenalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In be awarded costs and fees of compelling arbitration.general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be orderedto pay either actual damages of “statutory” damages affixed at not less than 2. The costs of the arbitration filing fee, arbitrator’s compensation, and$750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringement. For “willful” in- facilities fees that exceed the applicable court filing fee will be paid equallyfringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court by the student and the College. The student will not be responsible forcan, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorney’s fees. For details, see Title arbitration fees if the student proves hardship and, if represented by17, United States Code, Section 504, 505. an attorney, he or she does not advance clients’ litigation costs. In that instance, the arbitration fees will be paid by the College. The arbitratorWillful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including has power to award prevailing party attorney’s fees and costs if a claim isimprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. based on a statute providing such fees to any party. All fees, including theFor more information, please see the Web site of the U.S. Copyright Office opposing party’s attorney’s fees, shall be paid by a party whose claims areat www.copyright.gov, especially their FAQs at www.copyright.gov/help/faq. determined by the arbitrator to be frivolous. 3. The student recognizes that the facts and issues that surround any disputeStudent Conduct he or she might raise are unique and private to the student. The studentStudents at Stevens-Henager College are expected to conduct themselves as also understands that a lawyer may be willing to take the student’s caseresponsible adults. Expulsion, suspension, or some lesser sanction may be im- on its own and on a contingency fee basis because the amount of theposed for any of the following offenses: 1) interruption or any manner of in- student’s tuition that may be involved in a claim is monetarily significant.terference with the normal operation of the College; 2) illegal possession use, As such, to promote the prompt resolution of a dispute, the studentor furnishing of drugs while involved in College-related activities; 5) academic does not want and agrees not to combine or consolidate any disputescheating or plagiarism; 6) commission of other offenses (including use of in- (claims) with those of other students, such as in a class or mass action.appropriate Internet material) that in the opinion of administration may be The validity and enforceability of this single-case provision shall becontrary to the best interest of the College community. Sanctions that may be determined only by a single arbitrator. That arbitrator will decide onlyimposed are 1) warning, 2) suspension, or 3) expulsion. When appropriate, this question, and will not decide the merits of the student’s claim. INthe College will issue warnings prior to dismissing a student for poor conduct. THE EVENT THIS SINGLE-CASE PROVISION IS FOUND TO BEThe College, however, may dismiss a student without warning if the offense is UNENFORCEABLE, BOTH PARTIES AGREE TO WAIVE THEIRserious. The President makes the decision as to the seriousness of any offense. RIGHTS TO ARBITRATION AND TO A JURY TRIAL, AND THAT THE CLAIM SHALL BE SUBMITTED TO A JUDGE ONLY ANDStudent Complaint/Grievance Procedure NOT TO A JURY. The student may opt out of this single-case provision by delivering a written opt-out statement to be received by the CollegeAlternative Dispute Resolution: While no one expects disputes and conflicts, within 30 days of the student’s first execution of an Enrollmentsometimes they do occur; and it is in the best interests of the parties to resolve Agreement with the College.the dispute in the simplest, fastest, and least expensive manner. The partiestherefore agree to follow the three steps below: 24 Stevens-Henager College
    • Student Services 4. Any remedy available from a court under the law shall be available in delete material from courses, alter program content, cancel a program if there is the arbitration. The arbitrator(s) shall not have the power to commit any insufficient enrollment, and change faculty, as circumstances indicate. error of material fact, in law, or in legal reasoning and such error shall be corrected on appeal as provided below. Disaster Affecting the College’s Operations 5. To the extent the student has outstanding federal student loan obligations In the event of “Acts of God” affecting operations (i.e., fire, flood, hurricane, incurred in connection with his/her enrollment at the College, any tornado, etc.), Stevens-Henager College reserves the right to suspend training arbitration award providing monetary damages shall direct that those for a period not to exceed 90 days. damages be first paid towards those student loan obligations. 6. Nothing in this Agreement prohibits a student from filing a complaint with the state regulatory agency. A student may, but need not, be represented by an attorney at arbitration. Disability Services 7. Except as specifically required by laws of the state of Utah, the fact of Philosophy and all aspects of this arbitration and the underlying dispute shall remain Students with disabilities have a right to reasonable accommodations. strictly confidential by the parties, their representatives, and the BBB or the AAA. What is a Disability? 8. If student desires to initiate arbitration, he/she shall first contact the Stevens-Henager College uses the definition of disability set forth in Section Campus Director, who will provide the student with a copy of the BBB 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which states that a disabled person is Rules or the AAA Consumer Rules. Information about the BBB arbitration anyone who: process and Rules can be obtained at www.bbb.org or 1-703-276-0100. Information about the AAA arbitration process and the Consumer Rules • Has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or can be obtained at www.adr.org or 1-800-778-7879. The student shall more major life activities; then contact the BBB or the AAA, which will provide the appropriate • Has a record of such an impairment; forms and detailed instructions. The student shall disclose this document • Is regarded as having such an impairment. to the BBB or the AAA. Exceptions 9. Notwithstanding that the arbitration will be binding, if the College or the student loses in arbitration, the losing party may appeal for review to Students with diagnosed alcohol or drug abuse qualify for services only when a three-member arbitration appeal panel. That review shall examine the not actively engaged in the use of those substances. Individuals with temporary arbitration award for error as described in Section 4, above. The notice of disabilities (e.g., having a broken arm, recovering from surgery) do not qualify appeal must be in writing and served on the other party and on the BBB under the law as someone with a disability, and as such, are not entitled to or the AAA within ten (10) days of the date of the award. The notice of reasonable accommodations. appeal must specify those elements of the arbitration award that are being appealed and must contain a statement of the grounds for the appeal. Eligibility for Services Both parties shall participate in the selection of the panel. The fees and In order to receive accommodations, students must meet the following criteria: expenses of the appeal tribunal and the BBB or the AAA shall be paid in • Have a documented disability (documentation must be supplied) that full by the appealing party. Once the notice of appeal is timely served, presents a significant barrier to the educational process, and the arbitration award shall no longer be considered final for purposes of seeking judicial enforcement, modification, or annulment under the • The student must request services from Disability Services through the applicable arbitration statute. Following the appeal process, the decision Director of Student Services. rendered by the appellate arbitrators may be entered in any court having Provisional eligibility, which allows students to receive limited services and ac- jurisdiction. commodations, may be granted in the following situations: 10. OPT-OUT OF ARBITRATION. The student may entirely opt out • The student provides documentation that is outdated or incomplete and is of Jury Waiver and Agreement to Binding, Individual Arbitration by in the process of obtaining updated documentation, or delivering a written opt-out statement to be received by the College within 30 days of the student’s first execution of an Enrollment Agreement with • The student does not have ready access to required documentation, but provides the College. some other form of legitimate evidence of disability and the subsequent limita- tions and agrees to provide the required documentation in a timely fashion.Calendar Documentation RequirementsStudents can generally begin online classes at Stevens-Henager College in anymonth of the year. Please see detailed calendar on the last page of the catalog. Students are required to provide the Disability Services Office with medical or psychological documentation in order to receive accommodations. All medicalGovernmental Agencies information received by Disability Services remains confidential and is only re- leased to other College personnel with a student’s written permission. SpecificPrograms at Stevens-Henager College in Utah are approved for Veterans documentation requirements may vary slightly depending on the disability.benefits by the Utah State Approving Agency. All programs offered at Generally, students should use the following guidelines in determining whatStevens-Henager College, with the exception of Graphic Arts, are approved constitutes adequate documentation:for Veterans training. • Statement of disability, including diagnosis, instruments and/or tests usedProgram Modernization to reach that diagnosis, current medications (if any) used to treat the con- dition and their potential side effects, signed by a qualified medical/psy-Stevens-Henager College prepares its students for employment in the chological professional;technical, business, graphic arts, and medical communities. To best meetthe needs of these employers, periodic revision of our courses and majors is • Statement of the current impact of the disability on academic performance;necessary. Stevens-Henager College, therefore, reserves the right to add to or • Recommendations for appropriate academic accommodations. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 25
    • Student ServicesIf a student’s documentation is not current (within the last 3-5 years), or if astudent has a learning disability and the most recent testing was prior to age16, the student will be asked to seek more current testing and/or diagnosticinformation. This is to ensure that any accommodations made by the Collegeare best suited to the student’s current needs and/or level of functioning.AccommodationsStudents with disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations at Ste-vens-Henager College. Each student who chooses to seek accommodations willmeet with the Disability Services Coordinator, and together they will deter-mine what accommodations to request based on the needs of the student andthe demands of the course.Title IX and VI of the CivilRights ActAll educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance are required tocomply with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and Title VIof the Civil Rights Act of 1964, whereby institutions do not discriminate onthe basis of sex, race, color, or national origin in the educational programs oractivities that they operate. Stevens-Henager College is subject to these require-ments and complies fully. The President is the coordinator at Stevens-HenagerCollege. All students, faculty, and administrative employees should refer anycomplaints of discrimination in writing to the coordinator’s attention.Vocational Rehabilitation ActStevens-Henager College is an equal opportunity employer covered by Section504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 concerning nondiscrimina-tion under federal grants:Section 504. No otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the UnitedStates, as defined in Section 7(6) shall, solely by reason of his handicap, beexcluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjectedto discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial as-sistance.The President is the Stevens-Henager College Equal Employment Oppor-tunity Administrator. The Equal Employment Opportunity Administratoris responsible for ensuring that all applicants for admission are afforded equalopportunity in accordance with our EEO policy as well as supervising periodicreviews of our physical facilities and current policies, practices, and educationalprograms. In addition, the administrator is responsible for reviewing all com-plaints that allege discrimination of any sort. 26 Stevens-Henager College
    • Courses financial position on a cash basis. Covers the cost law alters behavior of individuals and business en-Course Descriptions cycle, raw materials, manufacturing costs, finan- tities. Emphasis on family financial planning. (Pre- cial reports, and budgeting for businesses that op- requisite: ACC332, or with consent of the Dean) erates as a manufacturing concern. (Prerequisite: ACC213, or with consent of the Dean) ACC 335 3.5 CreditsAccounting ACC 217 4 Credits Principles of Auditing I Designed to acquaint the student with methods ofACC 101 6 Credits Managerial Accounting verification, analysis and interpretation of gener-Accounting Fundamentals Covers the study of the use of accounting data in- ally accepted auditing procedures and the mechan-Introduces the fundamental principles and prac- ternally within a firm by managers in both man- ics of planning and implementing an audit and thetices of accounting, including the theory of debit ufacturing and non-manufacturing businesses. preparation of audits. (Prerequisite: ACC322, orand credit and the accounting cycle. Includes be- Teach students to use accounting data for plan- with consent of the Dean)ginning steps in analysis of accounting transac- ning, controlling, and making decisions concern- ing the optimum allocation of the firm’s financial ACC 337 3.5 Creditstions and their relationships to the basic account- Intermediate Cost Accountinging equation in preparation for more complex resources. (Prerequisite: ACC213, or with consent of the Dean) Discusses systems analysis, design, and implemen-problem analysis in advanced accounting. Covers tation, management control systems and currentaccounts receivable, accounts payable, special jour- ACC 233 3.5 Credits manufacturing control systems, and advanced costnals, cash receipts and payments and banking pro- Income Tax analysis, including quantitative applications. Top-cedures, as well as the accrual basis of accounting Timely, comprehensive study of the federal in- ics are discussed in the context of managementand the preparation of the worksheet and financial come tax structure as related to individuals, in- decision-making tools. (Prerequisite: ACC215, orstatements. cluding problems intended to provide a thorough with consent of the Dean)ACC 103 4 Credits understanding of the taxation laws. Practice in the preparation of the tax returns, supplemental forms ACC 338 3 CreditsPayroll Accounting Intermediate Computerized AccountingPresents the theoretical and practical applications and schedules required to be filed by individuals. (Prerequisite: ACC101, or with consent of the A further study of accounting using popular soft-of payroll procedures and emphasizes the methods ware packages. Students will study corporate in-of computing wages and salaries, keeping records, Dean) vestment, taxation, and inventory solutions andand the preparation of various federal and state ACC 320 6 Credits analysis while applying prior computerized ac-government reports. Students are required to com- Intermediate Accounting I counting skills. (Prerequisites: ACC108, ACC337,plete a comprehensive payroll project. (Prerequi- Provides in-depth attention to a variety of topics or with consent of the Dean)site: ACC101, or with consent of the Dean) including a review of financial reporting and the accounting profession, the conceptual framework ACC 436 3.5 CreditsACC 108 3 Credits Principles of Auditing IIComputerized Accounting of accounting, a detailed study of the income state- ment, balance sheet, and statements of cash flow. Provides the student information regarding theProvides a hands-on approach to learning how rapid and extensive changes confronting the ac-automated accounting systems function. Students A study of the accounting applications of the time value of money continues in this course, as well counting professional in the twenty-first century.operate a computerized general ledger, accounts Auditing theory and practice will be discussedreceivable, accounts payable, and payroll system. as cash and receivables, the valuation, cost alloca- tion, estimation, and non-cost valuation of inven- with emphasis on professional responsibilities and(Prerequisite: ACC101, or with consent of the abilities. (Prerequisite: ACC335, or with consentDean) tories. (Prerequisite: ACC215, or with consent of the Dean) of the Dean)ACC 212 3.5 Credits ACC 442 3.5 CreditsSpreadsheets ACC 322 6 Credits Intermediate Accounting II Advanced Accounting IApplies the student’s general understanding of ac- Focuses on financial accounting and reporting forcounting fundamentals to electronic spreadsheet This course studies acquisition, utilization, and re- tirement of non-current operating assets, as well as business combinations including accounting forsoftware. Students create and analyze financial the combination, preparation of financial state-statements and other accounting templates using the study of current and contingent liabilities, and further study of long-term debt, owner’s equity, ments before and after the transaction and ac-spreadsheet software. counting for the consolidated entity. (Prerequisite: and investments in debt and equity securities. AlsoACC 213 6 Credits covers the complexities of revenue recognition, ac- ACC322, or with consent of the Dean)Accounting Principles I counting for leases, correcting accounting errors, ACC 443 3.5 CreditsA continuation of ACC101 with special emphasis and an analytical study of financial reporting and Advanced Accounting IIon accounts receivable and uncollectible accounts, use of industry data for comparative analysis. (Pre- Focuses on international accounting including thepromissory notes, merchandise inventory, and tan- requisite: ACC320, or with consent of the Dean) translation of foreign subsidiaries and accountinggible and intangible assets. Emphasizes the theory for intercompany and foreign exchange transac-of internal control using the voucher system. Cor- ACC 332 3.5 Credits Federal Tax Accounting I tions. Also explores debt restructuring and liquida-porate topics include capital stock transactions, tions of an entity. (Prerequisite: ACC442, or withdividends, treasury stocks, and earnings per share, This course studies Federal income tax law cover- ing taxation of corporations, partnerships, estates, consent of the Dean)long-term liabilities, and short-term investments.(Prerequisite: ACC101, or with consent of the and trusts, as well as an introduction to tax re- ACC 444 3.5 CreditsDean) search and planning. (Prerequisite: ACC233, or Advanced Accounting III with consent of the Dean) Focuses on partnership accounting includingACC 215 6 Credits partnership formation, operations and ownershipAccounting Principles II ACC 333 3.5 Credits Federal Tax Accounting II changes and fund accounting including accountingDiscusses financial statement analysis including for government and nonprofit organizations. (Pre-comparative statements, measuring profitability, The importance of tax consequences that attach to common business transactions and how the tax requisite: ACC443, or with consent of the Dean)financial strength, and the statement of changes of To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 27
    • Courses DES 104 3 Credits from both a creative and a business perspective, Photoshop taking the project from creative brief to concept This course is designed to develop proficiency in development.Computer the Adobe Photoshop program. This course focus- es on the features of Photoshop that professionals DES 246 3 CreditsApplications consider to be the most important. Emphasis is placed on creating, recreating, and editing images Flash This course is designed to develop proficiency inAPP 101 3.5 Credits basic drawing and animating tools, with strong in preparing them for web and print.Computer Fundamentals functionality, interactivity, and usability.This course introduces the elements of several DES 105 3 Credits DES 250 3 Creditspopular computer software programs in word pro- Page Layout Tools Portfolio Designcessing, spreadsheet management, and presenta- This course builds a basic proficiency in layout and This course focuses on preparing the student’stion design. Emphasis will be placed on the basic production techniques currently being used by portfolio in preparation for employment. Thefundamentals of document creation, saving, and Graphic Art professionals. course culminates in a professional digital andprinting along with the more advanced concepts DES 109 3 Credits printed portfolio.of presentation design Graphic Design I This course focuses on the basic elements of design. DES 305 3 CreditsAPP 126 3.5 Credits Web Portfolio DesignDatabases DES 113 3 Credits This course will focus on successfully presentingThis course introduces several current database Typography work to potential clients via the internet. Emphasissoftware products and their use in business. Em- This course explores the critical role of typogra- is placed on identifying strengths and weaknessesphasis is placed on database terminology in the phy in graphic design. Course projects placed on as designers and selecting works that best showcasestudy of tables, queries, forms, and reports. Com- emphasis on the anatomy of the letterform, the an individual designer’s talents. Students will beputations and expressions are used to perform da- distinguishing features of different typefaces, and required to create an HTML-based Web Portfoliotabase inquiries. creative applications of type. site to present to potential clients or employers.APP 242 3 Credits DES 114 3 Credits DES 314 3.5 CreditsWeb Page Design Principles Print Production and Color Theory Advanced Color TheoryThis course focuses on designing and implement- This course focuses on the technical fundamentals This course focuses on advanced color principles,ing a hypertext-based publishing site using author- of producing professional print publications, in- terminology, and applications with an emphasis oning and scripting languages, content creation and cluding color theory and pre-press. managing color choices for graphic design proj-management tools, and digital media tools. Em- ects. Students will examine the specific propertiesphasis is placed on capturing information using DES 209 3 Credits and optical perceptions of color and learn how toemerging web technologies Graphic Design II create color harmonies for specific design projects This course implements the basic elements of de- based on logic and research and how color values sign with emphasis on effective composition in a are relevant to specific products. variety of projects.Computer Information DES 240 3 Credits DES 323 Intermediate Photoshop 3 CreditsSystems Information Design This course focuses on visually representing tech- This course will build on the concepts covered in Photoshop Basics by emphasizing advanced nical information in a variety of mediums. techniques in Photoshop. Topics covered includeCIS 575 4 CreditsHealth Information Systems DES 241 3 Credits advanced color management, quick masks, photoThis course addresses health information which is Web Design editing, and features specific to the latest Photo-a complex, dynamic, and strategic resource that is This course focuses on designing websites with cre- shop upgrades.vital to the health of individual patients as well as ative interfaces, strong graphic images, functional DES 324 3 Creditsthe nation’s population as a whole. The student site organization, and logical navigation. Intermediate Illustratorwill examine the management of healthcare data DES 242 3 Credits This course continues to build on the conceptsand the various tools for assessing and improving Logo and Identity Design covered in Illustrator Basics by emphasizing ad-the quality of patient and healthcare data This course focuses on developing essential skills vanced techniques in Illustrator. Topics covered for designing logos and corporate identities. include advanced color management and use of. the drawing tools in Illustrator; logo design; file DES 243 3 Credits preparation; advanced typography; and featuresDesign Layout Design specific to the latest Illustrator upgrades. This course uses the principles of effective compo-DES 103 3 Credits sition to create multi-page layouts. DES 336 3 CreditsIllustrator Basics Graphic Design IIIThis course focuses on vector software to produce DES 244 3 Credits This course focuses on the different styles that in-detailed and scalable art for most applications. Package Design fluence graphic design; conceptualizing projects;Course projects explore selection tools, drawing This course focuses on designing and creating reinventing cliches; creating balanced layouts;tools, layers, the pen tool, transformations/ distor- packaging with emphases placed on technical re- distilling complex information; and motivating antions, type tools, and modifying paths and shapes. quirements. audience. Course projects include creating com- plex grids; an annual report layout; poster and DES 245 3 Credits book designs; art posters; and a direct mail piece. Advertising Design This course teaches the rules of advertising design 28 Stevens-Henager College
    • CoursesDES 340 3 Credits of challenges from a record company logo to anBranding and Identity airline branding system allowing students to buildThis course focuses on developing essential skills personal style within constraints of realistic projectfor designing logos; marketing materials; andadvertising programs to establish and pro- briefs. Economicsmote corporate identities. Case studies focus on DES 375 3 Credits ECN 220 4 Credits Advanced Package Design Economicsgiant corporations such as CBS, BMW, and Sony This course focuses on designing the packaging of Basic course in microeconomic concepts.and how they established their corporate images branded products for retail display. Course proj- Topics include recession and depression, theand business strategically. Course projects require ects include creating packaging for champagne; circular flow of production and consumption, thedesigning or redesigning corporate identities for pizza; and perfume bottles. Additional emphasis is role of the market in the economy, wage and priceboth existing companies and newly established placed on mass versus prestige applications. movements, and other key points.businesses.DES 344 3 Credits DES 380 3 Credits ECN 221 4 Credits Advanced Illustrator Economic PrinciplesAdvanced Print Production This course is designed to provide students with Basic course in macroeconomic concepts. TopicsThis course builds on the concepts covered in a working knowledge if Illustrator’s advanced include inflation, the cause and effects of inter-Photoshop Basics. Emphasis will be placed features from tough pen tool challenges to gradi- est rates, the dollar and the foreign trade deficit,on learning the advanced techniques used by ent meshes, symbols, actions, and filters. Topics productivity growth rate, and the federal budgetgraphic design professionals. Topics covered in- include creating photo-realistic illustrations and deficitclude advanced color management, quick masks, complex patterns with emphasis on workflowphoto editing, and features specific to the latestPhotoshop upgrades. features to increase speed. This course builds on ECN 642 4 Credits basic Illustrator skills to tackle high-end projects Healthcare Economics and Policy AnalysisDES 355 3 Credits with depth and dimension. This course discusses microeconomic theory in-Graphic Design Business Management cluding demand and production, analysis ofThis course focuses on the essentials of setting DES 460 3 Credits health-care markets, anti-trust issues, hospital and Advanced Photoshop physician service markets, the role of insurance,up and managing a graphic design business. This course focuses on Photoshop’s advanced cost-effectiveness analysis, and government policy.Strategies are discussed for presenting a portfolio, features. Topics include professional approaches to (Prerequisite: ECN220 or the equivalent, or withfinding work, and marketing yourself, in addition composition; retouching; image correction; and consent of the Dean)to registering a company name, establishing an masking. Brushes, lighting textures, and specialaccounting system, and setting up a corporation. effects are explored as creative ways of producingAssignments include a business plan, RFP respons- high-impact images for print or web media. Thises, basic accounting, budgeting, and developingbusiness forms. course builds upon the basic level of Photoshop and requires projects that are challenging on both EnglishDES 360 3 Credits technical and artistic levels. ENG 101 4 CreditsFlash Animation English CompositionThis course focuses on drawing and animation DES 470 3 Credits Advanced Advertising Design II This course focuses on the principles of effectivetechniques for creating compelling characters English composition with a comprehensive review This course focuses on the rules of advertising designand interactive environments in Flash. Students and reinforcement of language arts skills. Empha- from both a creative and a business perspective. Caseexplore techniques for using scenes, movie clips, sis is placed on the four essentials of writing: unity, studies include print, web, and TV media showcasemasks, and compound objects to create animat- support, coherence, and sentence skills. Practice in advertising at work; persuasion, color psychology,ed buttons, graphics, cartoons, and interfaces. proofreading, editing, revision, and clear thinking and composition; copy writing and typography; andEmphasis is placed on applying and mastering the is incorporated throughout the course. brand communication. Course projects include adsprinciples of traditional animation using the basic for newspapers, magazines, subways, and transit/out-Flash toolset. ENG 103 4 Credits door applications, and a multi-part campaign. WritingDES 365 3 Credits DES 475 3 Credits Presents the fundamental principles of writtenFlash Action Scripting communications, specifically, common business Digital PhotographyThis course focuses on the history and basics of correspondence, reports, presentations, and min- This course focuses on advanced photographycomputer programming and learning how to write utes. Specific to this course is review of the steps techniques; approaches to composition and light-high-level ActionScript code that dynamically necessary to produce effective written communi- ing; correcting images using Photoshop; andplaces, moves, and alters the elements of a design cation. printing high-quality images. Emphasis is placedon screen. Students will be required to build a on developing a solid technical understanding ofclassic video game step-by-step and employ key ENG 223 4 Credits the medium and identifying individual expressiveActionScript programming skills and methods Communication Arts vision. Advanced projects explore experimentalwhile building up a code base that can be em- This course focuses on developing critical thinking methods for enhancing photographs with digitalployed in a range of personal and professional and communication skills in both verbal and non- effects.Flash applications. verbal areas. Emphasis is placed on debate, panel DES 499 3 Credits discussions, committee work, conflict resolution,DES 370 3 Credits Design Capstone Project interviews, and editorial writing.Advanced Logo Design This course requires students to complete anThis course exposes students to professional logo ENG 310 4 Credits individual or group project that will integrate theand branding design projects. Emphasis is placed Advanced Interpersonal Communication skills learned in course work for the program ason corporate identity, image, branding, and This course is designed to provide students with well as a portfolio that can be used to demonstraterepositioning with reference to intriguing real- the skills they need to be effective communicators. work quality to perspective employers.world case studies. Course projects offer a range Students will apply interpersonal communica- To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 29
    • Coursestion skills theory to various situations in order to FIN 445 4 Credits HCA 460 4 Creditsunderstand the clear connections between theory, Financial Management IV Health Facility Operationsskills, and life situations they will encounter. This course focuses on a comprehensive under- A review of long-term care facility operations standing of issues surrounding solicitation and utilizing simulations. Students make operational financial and estate planning concepts. The stu- decisions utilizing financial statements, census dent will learn to calculate long and short capital reports, staffing schedules, and other relevant fac-Finance gains. (Prerequisite: FIN444, or with consent of the Dean) tors. Prepares students for specific types of situa- tions and questions encountered on the long-termFIN 231 4 Credits care administrator licensing examination. (Prereq-Principles of Finance FIN 655 4 Credits uisite: HCA300, or with consent of the Dean)Emphasizes money and capital markets, invest- Healthcare Financements, corporate finance, and the universal This course addresses financial decisions healthcare HCA 462 4 Creditsapplication of each for a more micro-oriented professionals make on a daily basis. Students will Long Term Care Administrationrealistic approach to finance. Money, capital mar- assess financially viable options for a healthcare Application of health administration core curricu-kets, and financial instruments begin the course organization, the impact of the Medicare pay- lum to specific practice issues in the long-term carestudy with investment theory developed to guide ment system, and diagnosis-related groups on the setting. Setting specific organization structures, re-the student’s choice of financial instruments. healthcare industry. lationships with healthcare providers, services of-Concluding the course are the special finance fered, financial management issues, and regulatoryproblems of the large investor. issues are investigated. (Prerequisites: HCA300 and HCA440 or permission of the Dean)FIN 333Finance 4 Credits Healthcare HCA 542 4 CreditsIntroduces the principles and practices of financialmanagement. The course also teaches about work- Administration Issues in Managed Care This course serves as an introduction to the history, structure, and management issues associated withing capital management, financial budgeting and HCA 300 4 Creditsplanning and inter-national financing and invest- health maintenance organizations (HMOs), pre- The Healthcare Systeming decisions. It discusses a systematic treatment ferred provider organizations (PPOs), and other A study of the U.S. healthcare system to help stu-of the investing and financing decisions of mul- managed care options. dents understand the critical issues facing health-tinational firms. (Prerequisite: FIN231, or with care in its ever-changing environment, and to gain HCA 550 4 Creditsconsent of the Dean) a sense of the complex multidimensional nature of Organizational Behavior healthcare delivery in the United States. This course examines organizational change in-FIN 334 4 Credits cluding what effective managers can do to under-Financial Management I HCA 375 4 CreditsGives students pre-licensing preparation for life stand and anticipate such change and to respond Healthcare Financial Informationand health insurance. The purpose of life and accordingly. Topics include concepts in organi- This course is designed to build upon the con-health insurance, an overview of the insurance zational behavior, learning, motivation and per- cepts introduced in basic accounting courses andindustry, contracts, policy provisions, options formance, groups and organizational design, and to develop proficiency in applying administrativeand riders, beneficiaries, premiums and proceeds organizational processes. financial techniques in healthcare decision-mak-are covered. Other topics include underwrit- ing. (Prerequisite: ACC213, or with consent of HCA 600 4.5 Creditsing, annuities, social security, retirement plans, the Dean) Management Practices for the Healthcare Professionalgroup health, disability and accidental death and In this course, the student will assess current man-dismemberment. HCA 432 4 Credits Healthcare Economics and Policy agement practices as well as examine organiza-FIN 443 4 Credits tional and managerial theories for planning, orga- Discussion and analysis of the economic modelsFinancial Management II nizing, directing, and controlling the functions of controlling healthcare markets with subsequent in-Introduces the student to the world of financial healthcare administration. vestigation of the complex federal, state, and localmarkets, the regulatory bodies and regulations, policies and policy making processes which result HCA 640 4.5 Creditsand financial instruments. Topics include mar- from those models in the U.S. healthcare systems. Healthcare Administration and Policiesgincredit, trading strategies, and financial plan- This course provides a thorough overview of thening concepts. Focus will be directed to under- HCA 440 4 Credits healthcare system in the United States. Topicsstanding the concepts contained in the General Legal and Ethical Aspects of Healthcare Administration include identification of the nation’s healthcareSecurities Representative license exam (Series 7). Review of legal responsibilities of physicians, needs and the effect of the interaction of health,(Prerequisite: FIN334, or with consent of the other healthcare workers, and healthcare institu- government, and politics on meeting the identi-Dean) tions and means by which health-related laws and fied needs. regulations are developed and implemented. IssuesFIN 444 4 Credits involved in healthcare professional ethics are dis- HCA 675 4 CreditsFinancial Management III cussed and evaluated. Healthcare Personnel AdministrationIntroduces the student to the world of financial This course addresses the policies, methods, andmarkets, the regulatory bodies and regulations, HCA 450 4 Credits techniques utilized in public and healthcare orga-and financial instruments. Topics include types of Organizational Behavior nizations relating to human resource systems. Top-exchange orders, long and short-term capital gains This course examines organizational change in- ics include: recruitment, employment planningtaxation, and financial planning concepts. (Prereq- cluding what effective managers can do to under- and forecasting, managing diversity, testing, in-uisite: FIN443, or with consent of the Dean) stand and anticipate such change and to respond terviewing, the training process, organizing teams, accordingly. Topics include concepts organization- appraising performance, establishing strategic pay al processes. plans, financial incentives, benefits, labor relations, collective bargaining, and employee security. 30 Stevens-Henager College
    • CoursesHCA 690 4 Credits the most powerful industrial nation on earth. The HSA 544 4 CreditsFinal Project/Thesis student will learn how dominant and subordinate Outcomes Assessment and Quality ManagementStudents, individually or in teams, produce a groups have affected the shifting balance of power This course addresses why healthcare institutionsprofessional project or thesis that demonstrates in America since 1863. Major topics include: re- are responsible for the management and continu-the integration of the skills and concepts learned construction, the frontier, the 1890s, America’s ous improvement of quality in all aspects of theirthroughout the duration of the program. transition to an industrial society, Progressivism, operation. It exposes the student to the processes World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression and and quality tools used to develop effective quality the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, Viet- management programs as well as to assess current nam, economic and social change in the late 20th practices. It also covers how to evaluate outcomesHealthcare Practices century, and power and politics since 1974. data for interpretation to various audiences.HCP 460 4.5 Credits HSA 552 4 Credits Healthcare Information SystemsCase Management This course is designed to prepare students forCase management contains costs and maintainsquality healthcare by assessing, planning, arrang- Health Services management oversight, administrative design, acquisition and implementation of informationing, and monitoring the client’s health, social andsupport services. The course describes the histori- Administration technology systems. The course emphasizes basic knowledge of information systems in a health-cal background of service coordination, identifies HSA 505 4 Credits care environment. A component of the course is aappropriate resources and client needs, and differ- Health Service Organizations and Management team-based information technology strategic plan.entiates various case management types. Students This course addresses organizational arrangementswill learn techniques such as clinical pathways and for providing healthcare and their management.extended care pathways. Group discussion, case Course components include: the distinctive as-studies, and on-line problem solving sessions focus pects of health service organizations, organization-the students’ attention on the evolving care coor-dinator role. al structures and processes, the nature of manage- Health Services rial work, leadership, interpersonal relationships groups/teams, communication, decision-making, Management power, conflict, and change. HSM 515 4.5 CreditsHealthcare Science HSA 512 Health Service Economics 4.5 Credits Legal Considerations in Healthcare Delivery This course addresses the variety of legal questionsHCS 440 4 Credits This course provides students with a comprehen- and issues confronting healthcare professionalsHome Healthcare sive introduction to economic theories, models, today. The course includes such topics as liabil-Home healthcare is one of the fastest growing ar- concepts and analytical techniques and their im- ity, confidentiality of records, informed consent,eas in healthcare, reflecting the shift from hospital plication for application to, health services. Com- contracts, patient rights, employee rights and legalto home care. This course will provide you with ponents of the course include: supply and demand testimony.information on working with individual clients of for healthcare, competitive markets and marketall ages, integrating family/ caregiver issues, and behaviors, pricing and the influence of insurance HSM 520 4 Creditsusing environmental and community resources on utilization, economic models, resource deploy- Healthcare Planning and Marketingto promote optimal wellbeing to home healthcare ment, costs and productivity, and related health- This course examines the planning process in-patients. care system policy issues. cluding the concepts and procedures of strategies, problem solving and decision-making. It also ad-HCS 615 4 Credits HSA 518 4 Credits dresses the importance of marketing in healthcareThe Healthcare System Health Services Financial Management organizations.This course is a comprehensive course covering the This course is designed to provide the studentfull spectrum of healthcare services, identifying with an understanding of accounting and financialup-to-the-minute trends, and analyzing options management concepts/techniques to health ser-for future policies. vice organizations. Course components include: distinctive accounting and financial characteristics Management of health services organizations, interpreting basic MAN 103 4 Credits financial statements, financial ratios analysis, gov- Management Principles ernment and voluntary regulatory agency compli-History ance, and evaluating financial performance An introduction to the basic principles of manage- ment as it applies to formal organizations. Stu- dents are introduced to the importance of effectiveHIS 220 4 Credits HSA 538 4 Credits management within organizations. The traditionalAmerican Civilization Health Services Marketing management framework is used to provide essen-This course covers the history of the United States Focuses on aligning health service offerings with tial skills in planning, organizing, staffing, direct-from the American Revolution to the present. Em- the demands of markets in order to maximize cus- ing, and controlling.phasis is on the economic, political, and social de- tomer/client value and organizational competitivevelopment of our country. advantage. Course components include: nature of MAN 104 4 Credits the marketing function, differences in services and Business PracticesHIS 300 4 Credits product markets and marketing, market analysis,US History Since the Civil War Analyzes the major business activities of market- fundamentals of individual and organizational buy- ing, production, financial/information manage-This course offers students an overview of how ing behavior, elements of the tactical marketing mixAmerica transformed itself, in a relatively short ment, and personnel. Instruct students in the (service offering design, price, promotion and cus- operation of a business, focusing on ownership,time, from a land inhabited by hunter-gatherer tomer acquisition channels), and marketing plans.and agricultural Native American societies into business operations, and career opportunities. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 31
    • CoursesMAN 105 4 Credits eral government (government contractors), and MAN 340 4 CreditsMarketing on property concepts and issues in the state and Finance and Accounting for Property ManagementThis course focuses on business activities necessary local governments, universities, and medical orga- This course covers the concepts of finance and ac-to match products and markets. Marketing func- nizations (for profit and not for profit). Each of counting related to the property management lifetions such as purchasing, distribution, consumer the fundamental concepts will be studied, and a cycle from both a departmental operations and aanalysis, promotion, and pricing are discussed. review of regulations and compliance issues will be systems operation perspective. Students will learn covered. (Prerequisites: MAN225 and MAN227, how to approach budgeting and capital planning,MAN 210 4 Credits or with consent of the Dean) capitalize asset costs, determine estimated usefulEntrepreneurship life, calculate depreciation and net book value, and MAN 230 4 Credits determine retirement gains and losses. Addition-This course is a career-related overview of business Advertising Principlesstartups, idea identification, value proposition, ally, students will learn how to establish financial This course presents a general introduction to ad-and competitive advantages in a student’s area of benchmarks for measuring and improving the fi- vertising, its function, and role within the businessspecialization. The student will be able to identify nancial performance of a property management world. Students learn advertising techniques andand evaluate new business ideas; to learn how to department. how to develop an advertising plan. (Prerequi-prepare and evaluate business plans; and to iden-tify capital sources for new ventures. site: MAN105 Marketing, or with consent of the MAN 342 4 Credits Dean) Property Management Research andMAN 222 4 Credits MAN 280 4 Credits Writing ApplicationsInvestment Principles Upon completing this course the adult learner will Property Management ApplicationsFocuses on real estate investments, both private be able to conduct a research project using an ac- This course is a project oriented course that buildsand commercial. Terminology, mortgage and other ceptable research methodology and prepare a writ- upon the prior property management courses. Thefinancing means, valuation and appraisal concepts ten report. course is designed to utilize the management andare discussed. accounting skills learned in previous courses. The MAN 346 4 CreditsMAN 223 4 Credits student will select an instructor approved practi- Basic Contracts, Agreements, and GrantsInternet Commerce cal project, research and present issues related to Basic Contracting for Asset Managers is an inten-Introduces Internet commerce basics and focuses the project, and develop suggested solutions to the sive introduction to contracting, grants, and co-on business concepts and applying technology issues. (Prerequisites: MAN225, MAN227 and operative agreements giving you the informationin order to be successful. Other topics include MAN229, or with consent of the Dean) needed to understand the procurement processglobalizing a company, marketing and advertis- from initial formation to completion, both gov- MAN 324 4 Credits ernment & commercial. You’ll learn how con-ing, market trends, vendor solutions, credit card Operation Managementverification systems, security auction technologies, tracts, grants, and cooperative agreements really Explores long-range and short-range problems instorefronts, and overall technology architecture. work, how to find solutions to common problems, operations management, both for manufacturingStudents will learn to utilize Internet commerce understand the content of key documents and how and for service operations. Emphasizes under-solutions from process re-engineering to deploy- regulations and standards apply. standing these problems and the practical applica-ment and testing. tions of quantitative techniques relative to them. MAN 350 4 CreditsMAN 224 4 Credits Realistic case studies stress logical analysis, both Management Planning PrinciplesBusiness Law quantitative and qualitative, and the presentation This course addresses the principles of variousDeals with the legal problems confronting busi- of results. planning topics including strategic planning (mis-nesses such as court procedures, contracts, prop- sion, vision, objectives, and strategies), long and MAN 333 4 Credits short term operational planning, and developmenterty law, fair credit reporting, the Privacy Act, Advanced Marketingbusiness relationships, and supervision. of business plans. (Prerequisite: MAN103, or with This course provides a comprehensive examination consent of the Dean)MAN 225 4 Credits of the major components of marketing strategyProperty Management Principles and how they affect a company’s profitability and MAN 436 4 CreditsThis course will provide the student with an under- marketplace position. Core elements are integrated Selling and Sales Managementstanding of the life cycle of property management. to create a cohesive marketing strategy within the Develops a working understanding of selling pro-Fundamental concepts for each life cycle element context of an effective overall business strategy. cesses and sales management. Includes strategy,will be studied to provide a broad introduction to Emphasis is placed on the competitive dynam- development, organization, design, motivation,all property topics. ics and on the integration of marketing strategy leadership, and performance analysis. into the overall business strategy. Additionally,MAN 227 4 Credits this course provides the framework for analyzing MAN 443 4 CreditsIntermediate Property Management customer preferences and enhancing customer Organizational Design and ChangeThis course will advance the property life cycle relationships while building and managing brand Focuses on developing strategies and structuresconcepts of MAN225 and will provide the student equity with effective market communication. that align organizations with their industry en-with an understanding of property management vironments. Adapting to changes in technology,standards, risk analysis, auditing, valuation and MAN 335 4 Credits power structures, and competition are studied asappraisal. (Prerequisites: MAN225, or with con- Retail Marketing Principles well as planning and implementing changes in in-sent of the Dean) This course provides an overview of the general ternal systems and processes. principles regarding the organization of retailMAN 229 4 Credits stores and sound merchandising. Topics covered MAN 444 4 CreditsFederal and Contractor Focused include distribution of function and channels Human Resource ManagementProperty Management (wholesale, retail, and internet) provide a good Studies the application of psychology to the prob-This course focuses on property concepts and is- understanding of the elements of managing a suc- lems of personnel management. The student issues in the federal government (military and cessful retail business. (Prerequisite: MAN105, or expected to grasp a working knowledge of the ba-civilian), in companies that do work for the fed- with consent of the Dean) sic operative functions of procuring, developing, 32 Stevens-Henager College
    • Coursesmaintaining and utilizing a labor force sufficient MBA 602 4 Credits used in the analysis of business issues and prob-to meet the minimum entry-level requirements of Dynamics of the Organization lems. Students are encouraged to think aboutemployment in personnel work. A survey of the concepts and practices of organi- business issues and challenges from a scientific, zational development. A variety of organizational statistical point of view. Tools of statistical analysisMAN 450 4 Credits models is presented with applications to relevant for business are presented and applied to relevantInternational Business Principles business cases. Course features readings, cases, and business cases. Course features cases and readingsThis course addresses differences associated with discussion of statistical models and analysis for in- devoted to the environmental, technological, andglobal management, challenges in conducting dustry. interpersonal elements of an organization’s opera-import and export activities, as well as important tion.cultural differences that may affect the business re- MBA 609 4 Creditslationship. (Prerequisite: MAN103 Management MBA 603 4 Credits Applications in Economic AnalysisPrinciples, or with consent of the Dean) Marketing Management Applications of micro- and macroeconomic con- The development and execution of a company’s cepts to organizational decision-making. The sci-MAN 460 4 Credits marketing plan are emphasized in this course. entific analysis of economic variables in internalManaging a Property Management Organization and external environments is emphasized. Rela- All elements of the marketing organization areThis course addresses organizational placement of tionships between economic events and their im- reviewed, and their contributions to an effectivethe property function, structure of the property pact on organizational performance are presented. marketing effort are analyzed. The impacts of tele-function, cross-functional relationships, commu- communications and information technology onnication strategies, compliance and ethics and marketing are emphasized. MBA 610 4.5 Creditsother aspects of managing a property management General Managementorganization will be explored to enhance the stu- MBA 604 4 Credits This course focuses on managing concepts that aredent’s skills. Corporate Finance utilized in the dynamic environment of industry. In this course the student conducts an examination Issues and practices related to managing the enter- of advanced concepts in financial management. prise are presented and applied. The manager’s role Application of financial concepts and techniques in the organization’s environment is emphasized.Mathematics to relevant business cases is emphasized. Financial management’s evolving role in industry is present- MBA 611 Developing Business Strategy 4 CreditsMAT 220 4 Credits ed. Financial strategies are presented in the context The development, formulation, and implemen-College Algebra of a company’s overall strategic objectives. tation of business strategy is explored. StudentsDesigned to improve skills in numbers and alge- MBA 605 4 Credits are exposed to environmental considerations forbraic expressions, solving equations, graphing, Information Technology and Society organizational strategy and the impact of changesets, exponents, radicals, inequalities, formulas, This course covers the key elements in informa- dynamics and challenges of competition and bu-and applications. tion technology and their application to business reaucracy on organizational strategy.MAT 610 4 Credits and social organizations. Explores the nature of computing and telecommunications and their im- MBA 612 4 CreditsQuantitative Methods Leadership TheoryThis course introduces mathematical and statistical pact on societal structures. Rapid, complex change This course will address the theory and practice ofanalysis as related to business information, includ- induced by information technology and its influ- leadership in organizations. Traditional and mod-ing profit and inventory analysis. Theory, tools, ence on decision-making is emphasized. Course ern theories of leadership will be explored, as welland techniques involved with information systems features readings, cases, and discussion of informa- as the practical application of these theories in theas used by management are introduced. Other tion technology’s impact on industry. workplace. In addition to covering the traditionaltopics include research design, data collection MBA 606 4.5 Credits concepts of leadership in organizations, this courseand organization, sampling, inferential statistical Communication Dynamics for Professionals will take an in-depth look at the power and in-methods, and results interpretation. (Prerequisite: A practical approach to communication theory, fluence a leader has over the organization and itsMAT220 or equivalent within the last 5 years, or this course enables students to understand and members.with consent of the Dean) apply the principles of communication to organi- zational encounters. Various strategies for effective MBA 613 4 Credits Advanced Human Resource Management communication are provided, including inter- and This course covers the major aspects of human intrapersonal settings. Emphasis is placed on im- resource management. It provides an assessmentMaster’s in Business proving communication performance by applying strategies for enhanced communication. of the human resource management field. Top- ics include: equal employment opportunity, jobAdministration MBA 607 4.5 Credits analysis, strategic planning, recruitment, selection, International Management training and performance appraisal. Compensa-MBA 601 4 Credits A presentation of the conceptual and practical tion, benefits, safety and health and labor manage-Financial Accounting for Management ment relations are also included. skills required of a manager in the global arena.An examination of accounting procedures related Business and trade concepts, international risk,to recording, reporting, analyzing, and interpret- multinational strategies, and cross-cultural man- MBA 614 4 Creditsing financial data. Applies accounting concepts Capstone Project agement concepts are this course’s cornerstoneand perspectives to financial and business deci- Students will be required to complete a project concepts. Students are presented with organiza-sions. Emphasis is placed on applying technical ac- or write a thesis that integrates and demonstrates tional and operational models appropriate to man-counting procedures in the evaluation and analysis mastery of the basic learning objectives of the de- aging an entity in a global setting.of business events. gree program. MBA 608 4 Credits Statistics for Management An in-depth treatment of statistical procedures To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 33
    • Courses covered in detail. Students set up and connect toMedical Microcomputer multiple services.MED 350Clinical Information Systems 4 Credits Systems NET 115 Security Concepts 3.5 CreditsThis course provides an overview of the role of MCS 101 3.5 Credits This course concentrates on general security con-information systems in healthcare organizations. Computer Servicing I cepts, communication security, infrastructureCoursework emphasizes the integration of evi- Focuses on diagnosis and repair of computer sys- security, basics of cryptography, and operational/dence-based research into clinical decision-making tems. Passive and preventive maintenance proce- organizational security.and the influence of information systems on health dures are studied. Also includes: theory and prac-outcomes. Explores technical, organizational, and tice in upgrade and configuration of computer NET 221 3.5 Creditscost-benefit issues related to healthcare informa- systems, including addition of memory, pointing Network Communications Ition systems, including clinical decision-support, device interfacing, hard drives, printers, modems, Examines switch and router communications andtelemedicine applications, and integrated net- and multimedia upgrade kits. configurations. Students learn network types, net-working and distributed computing technologies. work media, switching and routing fundamentals, MCS 102 3.0 Credits TCP/IP, IP addressing and routing, WAN tech-MED 370 4 Credits Computer Servicing II nologies, operating and configuring switch andHealth Principles Introduces the proper procedures for assembly and router operating systems, and managing networkThis course addresses the topics of physical, men- disassembly of a computer system. Safety concepts environments. (Prerequisite: OPS101, NET103,tal, and social health as it relates to the individual. and procedures are covered, including electrostatic NET104, or with consent of the Dean) discharge (ESD) and electrical shock hazards. Stu-MED 380 4 Credits dents are introduced to the proper tools necessary NET 224 3.5 CreditsHuman Pathology to assemble and disassemble a computer. Cables Network Communications IIThis course provides an overview of acute and and connectors are identified and case styles are Students select, connect, configure, and trouble-chronic diseases, how these diseases affect the hu- covered. In this course, a student will disassemble shoot various switch and router networking devic-man body, and actions one might take to reduce a computer and identify all components. The stu- es. Concepts include extending switched networksthe risk. (Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MED370) dent will then properly assemble the computer and with VLANs, determining IP routes, managing IP verify proper operation. (Prerequisite: MCS101, traffic with access lists, establishing point-to-pointMED 385 4 Credits connections, and establishing frame relay connec-Issues in Public Health or with consent of the Dean) tions. (Prerequisite: NET221, or with consent ofThis course provides the student with an in-depth MCS 213 3.5 Credits the Dean)study of selected contemporary health problems. Workstation AdministrationIt examines the contributing social, psychological, Focuses on installation, configuration, and admin- NET 303 3.0 Creditsphysical, legal, and cultural factors in health. istration of workstation operating systems. Stu- Principles of Storage Area Networks dents install, upgrade, and configure workstations Students are introduced to Storage Area NetworkMED 401 4 Credits design, philosophy, and implementation. DesignAdvanced Human Anatomy while working with file systems, devices, drivers, accounts, and protocols. (Prerequisite: OPS101, concepts and requirements focusing on enterpriseThis course is an advanced study of the human application availability and data management arebody including anatomy, physiology, mechanisms or with consent of the Dean) discussed. Enterprise information processing ar-for maintaining homeostasis, and histology. The MCS 214 3.5 Credits chitecture and data centers are also discussed. (Pre-course covers the function of tissues, organs and Server Administration requisite: NET103)systems. Covers installation, configuration, and administra- tion of server operating systems. Students install, NET 304 3.5 CreditsMED 410 4 Credits Clustering and Load BalancingResearch in Health Science upgrade, configure, and administer servers while working with disks, accounts, and system resourc- Students are introduced to clustering and load bal-This course provides students with a structured ancing technologies. Emphasis is placed on zeroprocess to evaluate the health research literature. es. (Prerequisite: OPS101, MCS 213, or with con- sent of the Dean) downtime and solutions to real life scenarios andThe course demonstrates the ingredients that go challenges. (Prerequisite: NET104)into a meaningful study and teaches students toidentify clues to potential study flaws. Students NET 411 4.5 Creditsalso learn ways to apply solid evidence in the Capstonehealth sciences. Networking This course gives the student the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of network design, imple-MED 450 4 Credits NET 103 3.5 Credits mentation, and management. Students are re-Principles of Epidemiology Basic Networking Concepts quired to deliver a project plan and timeline toIn this course students will explore the concepts Introduces networking concepts, history, and tech- the instructor. Upon approval, students deliver aand methods for analyzing the spread and control nology. Students learn vocabulary and network working network using heterogeneous server andof disease. The course also covers modern trends in terminology and are trained to identify compo- network technologies that encompass all of thesolving community health problems. (Prerequisite: nents of a network. Different types of topologies integrated knowledge gained from classroom andMED380 or permission of the Dean) and protocols are covered, and students are trained project experiences. (Prerequisite: Completion of to implement and support small networks. all technical courses) NET 104 3.5 Credits NET 424 3.5 Credits Networking Infrastructure Network Design Introduces server-based networking, using net- Focuses on the analysis and design of LANs and working programs. Students install, configure, and WANs. Considers mission critical data, backup, administer the server operations. The concepts and and clustering. Cabling, connection speeds, utili- skills used to set up and administer a network are 34 Stevens-Henager College
    • Courseszation, collisions, and calculating bandwidth and individuals and populations. Course components NUR 480 4 Creditsthroughput are also covered. Both theoretical and include: relevance of concepts from psychology, Nursing Management and Leadershippractical study of LANs and WANs are explored in sociology, economics and anthropology; planning, This course compares and contrasts managementthis course. (Prerequisite: NET221, or with con- implementation and evaluation models; health as- and leadership. It explores the relationship be-sent of the Dean) sessment and disease management technologies; tween leadership principles, management prin- and health education. Illustrative case applications ciples, (e.g., strategy development, motivation ofNET 425 3.5 Credits include: heart/cardiovascular disease, fitness and employees, communicating with subordinates andAdvanced Network Communication weight control, HIV, and accidents. supervisors, establishing goals, reinforcing values,Increases student’s knowledge of analog trans- monitoring performance and providing feedback,mission standards including VPNs, DSL, CATV, NUR 340 4 Credits etc.) and success in healthcare administration.VOIP, and GSM and wireless network technolo- Health Assessmentgies. Wireless LAN, public data networks, cellular By successfully completing this course, students NUR 481 4 Creditsand PCS concepts and applications are presented. acquire the skills required to conduct comprehen- Leadership, Power, and Politics in NursingDesign, signal processing, protocols, security, and sive health assessments, including the physical, This course focuses on exploring leadership theo-best practices are also covered, using practical ex- psychological, social, functional, and environmen- ries in relation to organizational structures and be-amples and solutions. (Prerequisite: NET103 or tal aspects of health. Students learn the process of haviors, which will be related to the developmentconsent of the Dean) data collection, interpretation, documentation, of leadership styles and policy making within or- and dissemination. ganizations. Emphasis will also be placed on the political and economic forces that influence the NUR 360 4.5 Credits development of health policy and professional Community and Family HealthNursing This course is designed to provide students with nursing practice. the knowledge and skills that are essential in work- NUR 490 4 CreditsNUR 300 4 Credits ing with communities to assess, develop, imple- Senior ProjectResearch in Nursing Practice ment, and evaluate community change strategies This course is designed to provide the studentThe course provides students with a structured that will promote improved health status. Topics with the opportunity to apply both the theoreti-process to evaluate the health research literature. include current issues in community health, inter- cal foundations and clinical knowledge of nursingThe courses demonstrates the ingredients that go vention strategy design, wellness promotion and science to a self-directed scholarly project of theinto a meaningful study and teaches students to disease prevention, and issues in providing health- student’s choice. The student will select a topic,identify clues to potential study flaws, Students care to diverse populations. which will be approved by the instructor, and thenalso learn ways to apply solid evidence in clinical the student and the instructor will agree upon apractice. NUR 421 4 Credits measurable course of study that allows the student Critical Issues in NursingNUR 310 4 Credits to identify learning needs, while engaging in schol- This course focuses on examining the past, cur-Pathophysiology arly activities which will enhance the professional rent, and future impact of selected themes relatedThis course is designed to provide the student with practice of the learner. to healthcare in general and nursing practice at thea fundamental understanding of the mechanism of local, national, and international levels. Empha- NUR 542 4 creditsdisease. The student will identify disease manifes- sis is placed on the longitudinal nature of many Teaching Critical Thinking and Clinical Decisionstations, complications and general treatment mea- contemporary issues and trends that have a direct This course is designed to prepare the prospec-sures. Students will examine conditions that may impact on the development of nursing science, tive nurse faculty with the theoretical principles,alter health status including normal changes such practice, and education. process, and instructional skills to promote criticalas aging and pregnancy. thinking that results in appropriate clinical deci- NUR 425 4.5 Credits sion-making when interacting with student nursesNUR 315 4.5 Credits Psychological Aspects of Illness and DisabilityProfessional Role Development in the classroom and clinical settings. Techniques This course introduces you to the mental and emo-Students explore and define issues related to pro- for facilitation of learning will be emphasized. tional aspects of illness. You address the relation-fessional practice, ethics, career planning, personal ship between stress and illness, the patient-doctor NUR 545 4 Creditsgoal setting, and empowerment of self and others. relationship, treatment compliance, and care for Technology for Nursing Education and PracticeStudents will learn concepts concerning job per- the terminally ill. The purpose of this course is to expand on technol-formance, performance expectations and evalua- ogy skills that support the nurse educator in thetion, stress management, and lifelong professional NUR 450 4 Credits learning environment. This course prepares thedevelopment. Nursing Informatics student educator with the skills to utilize available This course introduces applications of informaticsNUR 325 4 Credits technology for the development of resident course systems to nursing practice, education, research,Theoretical Foundations of Nursing work, on-line course work for the academic set- and administration. Practical use of computerStudents learn core theoretical concepts of nurs- ting, program development for staff and patient technology based health applications to identify,ing practice: health, wellness, illness, caring, en- education, and the preparation community out- gather, process, and manage information will bevironment, self-care, individuality, interpersonal reach programs. explored.relationships, and decision-making. Students will NUR 585 4 Creditsintegrate theory, research and practice as they learn NUR 465 4.5 Credits Contemporary Issues In Gerontologythe historical evolution of professional nursing and Evidence Based Nursing The course provides students with an overview ofthe theoretical foundations which have emerged. This course focuses on clinical reasoning and clini- current issues and concepts in the field of gerontol- cal outcomes, information systems and manage-NUR 335 4 Credits ogy, including theories of aging and public policy, ment, evidence-based practice. It promotes theHealth Promotion and Disease Prevention law and the elderly, aging and chronic disease, development of skills in using the research processAn introduction to the strategies/tactics for pre- home health, long-term care, elder abuse, finances to define clinical research problems with applica-venting disease and promoting health in both and the elderly, caregiver issues, and centenarians. tion to practice. Students investigate selected contemporary is- To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 35
    • Coursessues in adulthood and old age, such as family and NUR 672 4 Credits driver theory. A short history of operating systemsfriend relationships; work and retirement; politi- Issues in Nursing is covered. Installation, configuration, use, andcal, legal, and economic. The focus of the course is on the examination and troubleshooting of operating systems are covered, analysis of current trends as they relate to advanced and students are given the opportunity to prac-NUR 601 4 Credits nursing practice. Selected factors in healthcare de- tice related skills. Batch file programming is alsoNursing Administration I covered. livery and the legal, moral and ethical implicationsThis course addresses front-line skills and knowl- for actual practice will be examined. A study ofedge for nursing administration based on a foun- systems, leadership and organization, and their ap- OPS 113 3.5 Creditsdation of sound management theory as it relates to Linux Operating System plication to healthcare, including entrepreneurialhealthcare delivery. Students integrate clinical ex- This course serves as an introduction to the Linux programs presented. Concepts of public policyamples and develop skills for evaluating care plan operating system. Students learn to install, config- and the impact of selected organizations’ policiesdelivery models and structures, thinking critically, ure, and administer the Linux operating system. will be examined as they relate to healthcare andempowering teams resolving conflicts; coaching Other topics include desktop applications, clients, advanced nursing practice.and mentoring, educating staff and assessing clini- games, LAN, WAN, the shell, and shell scripts.cal competence, allocating resources, and ensuring NUR 673 4 Credits (Prerequisite: OPS101, or with consent of theand measuring productivity and efficiency. Evaluation Strategies Dean) In this course students examine the evaluationNUR 651 4 Credits process. The focus is on the evaluation process, OPS 204 3.5 CreditsNursing Administration II Electronic Communication Management measurement strategies, and related sociocultural,This course builds on the skills learned in Nurs- Covers the installation, configuration, and admin- ethical and legal issues.ing Administration. Students will be expected to istration of electronic communication. Studentsformulate, write, and present case studies about NUR 675 4 Credits learn about electronic communication in a net-major health-care issues from the perspective of Program Development work environment, how to configure electronican administrative team member in a health-care In this course students examine curriculum pro- communication for a group of users, and commonorganization. cesses for educational program development. The administration tasks. (Prerequisite: NET103 or focus is on examination of the theoretical founda- NET104, or with consent of the Dean)NUR 652 4 Credits tions for program philosophy, curriculum design,Advanced Nursing Theory and analysis of the impact of external and econom- OPS 205 3.5 CreditsThis course builds on the knowledge and skills de- Security Management ic factors on program development.veloped throughout the program. Students will be Covers implementing and administering securityexpected to research and present case studies about NUR 680 4 Credits on a server. (Prerequisite: NET103 or NET104, orcurrent trends, licensing requirements throughout Advanced Pharmacology with consent of the Dean)the country, and future projections for the nursing The focus of this course is on the clinical use ofindustry. drugs commonly used in primary care settings. OPS 213 3.5 Credits Advanced Linux Operating System Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and phar-NUR 653 4 Credits macotherapeutics of selected categories of drugs Covers advanced concepts in the installation,Leadership Theory management, configuration, security, documenta- are explored. Students will explore the effects ofThis course will address the theory and practice of tion, and hardware of the Linux operating system. such variables as age, race and gender and their ef-leadership in organizations. Traditional and mod- Students demonstrate proficiency in these areas in fect upon their relationship to specific prescribingern theories of leadership will be explored, as well a hands-on environment. (Prerequisite: OPS113, practices.as the practical application of these theories in the or with consent of the Dean)workplace. In addition to covering the traditional NUR 690 4 Credits OPS 217 3.5 Creditsconcepts of leadership in organizations, this course Capstone Projectwill take an in-depth look at the power and in- General Operating Systems Students will be required to complete an individu-fluence a leader has over the organization and its This course addresses advanced concepts in the in- al or group project or write a thesis that integratesmembers. stallation, configuration, management, and secu- and demonstrates mastery of the basic learning ob- rity of a selected server operating system. Students jectives of the degree program.NUR 668 4 Credits learn to configure and manage advanced networkResearch and Evaluation Methods NUR 692 6 Credits services in a hands-on environment. Planning,This course exposes the student to the skills for Nurse Education Practicum documentation, troubleshooting, and securityengaging in scholarly inquiry, utilizing informa- In this course, students are expected to integrate concepts are covered. (Prerequisite: OPS101, ortion resources, evaluating research, identifying previous knowledge and develop proficiency in the with consent of the Dean)problems, and measuring outcomes in practical role of nurse educator. Students will collaboratesettings, and using research findings for clinical with faculty to develop an individualized plan of OPS 280 3.5 Creditsdecision-making. Topics include; principles of Advanced Server Administration study related to their educational interest. (Prereq-problem analysis, how to confront decisions re- Covers operating system and network scripting. uisites: NUR670, NUR673, and NUR675)lated to the design of a research study and how to Introduces network programming, including writ-critically examine approved research methods. Se- ing programs that communicate with other pro-lected research designs include descriptive, survey, grams across a computer network. Topics addresscase study, ethnography, historical, phenomenol- using an application program interface, underlyingogy and grounded theory. Operating Systems operating systems, and network protocols. (Pre- requisite: OPS113, or with consent of the Dean)NUR 670 4 Credits OPS 101 4.0 CreditsInstructional Strategies Introduction to Operating SystemsIn this course students examine the instructional Students are taught basic operating system con-process. The focus is on learning theories, the cepts including the boot process, interrupt han-learning environment and instructional strategies. dling, CPU instruction cycle theory, and device 36 Stevens-Henager College
    • Courses PRG 104 3.0 Credits ing database problems and failures. (Prerequisite:Philosophy Programming Fundamentals APP126) Introduces the student to the Software Develop-PHI 221 4 Credits ment Environment. Students will create working PRG 342 3.5 CreditsIntroduction to Logic Advanced Structured Query Language programs. Students learn best practices in debug-This course focuses on the techniques for deter- Increases the student’s knowledge in the area of ging, trouble shooting, and interacting with themining the validity of arguments and analyzing Structured Query Language. Topics of discus- computer’s operating system.problems in the world. Topics include a discussion sion include the use of triggers, views, stored (Prerequisite: PRG102, PRG103)of informal fallacies, Aristotelian logic, and sym- procedures, functions, and other advanced querybolic logic. PRG 105 3.0 Credits techniques. The student is introduced to database C# I security as it pertains to data access. (Prerequisite:PHI 310 4 Credits Students are introduced to desktop programming APP126, PRG140)Critical Thinking using the C# language. Object Oriented Program-This course is designed to provide an interdisci- ming concepts are covered in this course. (Prereq- PRG 343 3.5 Creditsplinary approach to critical thinking and challeng- Database and Software Integration uisite: PRG102, PRG103)es the student to question their own assumptions Expands student knowledge of database conceptsthrough analysis of the most common problems PRG 111 3.5 Credits utilizing best practices. Students write software ap-associated with everyday reasoning. The course Web Design I plications with full database connectivity features.explains the fundamental concepts, describes the Introduces the student to the basics of Web-Page Students are introduced to database connectivitymost common barriers to critical thinking and of- design. This class provides a solid foundation in techniques, the basic concepts of data retrieval andfers strategies for overcoming those barriers. the elements of design, type sizes, and styles using manipulation, and N Tier architectural design. contemporary HTML, XML, and CSS technolo- (Prerequisite: APP126)PHI 400 4 Credits gies. (Prerequisite: PRG102, PRG103)Modern Issues in Ethics PRG 351 3.5 CreditsThis course provides students with a comprehen- PRG 140 3.5 Credits Java Isive introduction to a broad array of the most Structured Query Language Students learn about the Java program develop-pressing contemporary debates in medical eth- Students are introduced to the fundamentals of ment environment and understand the role Javaics. The student will examine the social contexts Structured Query Language. This course focuses plays in developing distributed client/server appli-within which these debates arise. Topics include: on the basic techniques of SQL as it applies to cations for the Internet.the foundation of bioethics, research ethics and data retrieval and manipulation. (Prerequisite:informed consent, truth telling and confidentiality APP126) PRG 410 3.5 Credits(medical record confidentiality), genetic control, Web Programming IIapplication of scarce medical resources, impaired PRG 249 3.5 Credits Expands the student’s knowledge of web-based ap-infants and medical futility, and euthanasia. Web Design II plication development Session state management, Expands upon the student’s knowledge of Website data security, dynamic form generation, intranet development by introducing the concepts of data- and Internet security concepts, and storefront driven web pages using XML technologies. (Pre- merchant functionality are some of the topics cov- requisites: PRG111) ered in this class. (Prerequisite: PRG310)Programming PRG 250 3.0 Credits PRG 411 4.5 CreditsPRG 101 3.5 Credits Web Design III CapstoneSolutions Concepts Expands upon the student’s knowledge of Website This course gives the student the opportunity toIntroduces students to project management. Top- development by introducing the concepts of data- demonstrate mastery of software development.ics include analysis of business requirements, de- driven web pages using XML technologies. (Pre- Students are required to deliver a project plan andvelopment and deployment cycles, creating project requisites: PRG111, PRG 249) timeline to the instructor. Upon approval, stu-plans for successful delivery, implementation of risk dents deliver a working application (either Webmanagement techniques and mitigation strategies, PRG 310 3.5 Credits or Desktop) that encompasses all of the integratedscheduling task cycles, and implementing monitor- Web Programming I knowledge gained from classroom and project ex-ing tools and controls to track project progress. Introduces the students to fundamentals of dy- periences. (Prerequisite: Completion of all techni- namic web application programming. Server cal courses or with the permission of the Dean)PRG 102 3.5 Credits Components and ADO, client/server-side applica-Fundamentals and Concepts tions, de-bugging, security, scripting, data valida- PRG 422 3.5 CreditsIntroduces elementary programming concepts. tion, cookies, and cross-browser compatibility are C++Areas of study include an introduction to the his- discussed. (Prerequisite: PRG104) Introduces C++ object-oriented programmingtory of programming and programming languag- concepts. (Prerequisite: PRG 102, PRG 103, PRGes, flow charts, and logic structures. PRG 321 3.5 Credits 104) C# IIPRG 103 3.5 Credits Expands student’s knowledge of Object Oriented PRG 441 3.5 CreditsLogic Structures Programming in C#. This course focuses on work- Database ReportingIncreases student knowledge of programming con- ing with classes, namespaces, and multiple projects Introduces the students to the fundamentals ofcepts (i.e., flowcharts, logic structures). Structures in single solutions. (Prerequisite: PRG105) data presentation using popular reporting soft-and basic programming constructs are explored ware. Analyzing business requirements, report lay-and applied. Students are introduced to data types PRG 340 3.5 Credits out and design, data validation, formulas, and dataand use of variables in programming.(Prerequisite: Database Administration formatting are a focus of this course. (Prerequisite:PRG102) Presents database administration. Students learn APP126) to set up, maintain, and trouble-shoot a database. Instruction focuses on understanding backup and PRG 451 3.5 Credits recovery methods, diagnosing and troubleshoot- Java II To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 37
    • CoursesExpands student knowledge in the areas of Java of aging as a social process. The course addresses aprogramming. The student learns how to create broad range of societal issues and covers conceptspackages, import classes and interfaces from other associated with an aging population. It examinespackages, and create a program’s main method. the concept of aging on both an individual andOperators and assignments, declarations and ac- societal level. Major topics include: the history ofcess control, flow control, and exception handling aging in America; physical aging; psychological as-are also studied. Other topics include overloading, pects of aging; personal adaptation to aging; deathoverriding, runtime type, and object orientation, and dying; community social services; how aginglanguage fundamentals, operators and assign- affects personal needs and resources; and govern-ments, and threads. (Prerequisite: PRG351) ment responses to the needs of the aging.Psychology StatisticsPSY 101 4 Credits STA 322 4 CreditsPsychology of Motivation StatisticsStudents will review skills necessary to be success- Explores practical skills in statistics. Topics cov-ful in college including: note taking; study skills; ered will be distributions, relationships, random-writing; finding and using information on the ness, inference, proportions, regression, and vari-Internet; and reading/understanding college-level ance. Emphasis will be placed on understandingtext. Students will be exposed to basic motivation the use of statistical methods and the demandstheories, values clarification, and philosophic prin- of statistical practice. (Prerequisite: MAT220)ciples.PSY 299 4 CreditsProfessional DevelopmentThis course addresses employment search andacquisition skills. Topics include matching quali-fications with job requirements; resume prepara-tion; job applications; and cover letters, follow-upletters, resignation letters, and recommendationletters. Classroom activities include discussion ofbasic interviewer questions and interviewing tech-niques.PSY 400 4 CreditsBiological PsychologyThis course introduces the student to the intricaterelationship between biology and psychology. Thestudent is exposed to the emerging field of bio-psychology in which fascinating new discoveriesare constantly being made. Major topics include:anatomy of the nervous system, plasticity of thebrain, sensory systems and attention, wakefulnessand sleeping, emotional behaviors, the biology oflearning and memory, and psychological disorders.SociologySOC 220 4 CreditsSociologyThis course addresses the relationships among dif-ferent social institutions. It examines the dynamicsin social groups. Topics covered include the con-cepts of control, inequity, and change within socialgroups.SOC 400 4 CreditsSociology of AgingThis course contains an interdisciplinary approachthat provides the concepts, information and exam-ples students need to achieve a basic understanding 38 Stevens-Henager College
    • Administration/Faculty/Staff Associate Dean – Healthcare and NursingAdministration/Faculty/Staff Evelyn Shinn Ed.D., Educational Leadership, Argosy UniversitySalt Lake City/Murray M.A.T., Education, Colorado College B.S. Nursing, Plattsburgh State UniversityExecutive DirectorAlan D. Hansen Program Chair of NursingPh.D., Educational Administration Higher Education, Cynthia BoolIllinois State University M.S. in Nursing/Healthcare Education, University of PhoenixM.B.A., Brigham Young University B.S in Nursing, University of PhoenixB.A., Brigham Young University Associate Dean – Accreditation & StandardsDean of Graduate Studies Paul Van AsscheLarry A. Kruger J.D., Michigan State UniversityEd.D., Educational Leadership & Foundations, Brigham Young University M.B.A.-H.C.M., University of PhoenixM.P.A., Brigham Young University B.A., Albion CollegeB.S., University of Utah Faculty Training CoordinatorAssociate Dean - Business Jeff Davis, M.Ed., University of PhoenixRandall Myers Pam Caton, M.S., Western Illinois UniversityStrategy and Plans, Naval War CollegeM.B.A., University of Phoenix Registrars’ OfficeB.S., Business, Oregon State University Rebecca Jackson, Registrar Paul Avery, Assistant RegistrarAssociate Dean - Accounting Rebecca Sorenson, Assistant RegistrarJoseph DunlopM.B.A., Westminster College Learning Resource CenterB.S., Finance, University of Utah Randall Ward, M.L.I.S. Brooke RussellProgram Chairs of BusinessJean Anderson, MAOM, University of Phoenix Student AdvisingHolly Andrews, M.B.A., University of Phoenix Kira Richards, Director of Student ServicesAmanda Ferrante, M.B.A., University of Southern ColoradoMarilee Hall, M.B.A., Westminster College Career Services John Chambers, Director of Career ServicesAssociate Dean – Computer Science Shane Ordway, Career CoachThomas Santa MariaM.S., University of Phoenix Business OfficeB.S., Colorado Christian University Bret Whetman, Business Officer Scott Schuler, Financial Aid CoordinatorAssociate Dean – Graphic ArtsDavid Cowsert AdmissionsM.S., Portland State University Steve Gwost, Director of AdmissionsB.S., Portland State University Elisha Anderson, Director of AdmissionsProgram Chairs of Graphic ArtsShelly Gooden, M.A., Capella UniversityJason Merrill, A.S., LDS Business SchoolCraig Stokes, A.S., Colorado Institute of ArtAssociate Dean – General EducationLaura PruettM.B.A., Business Administration, Jones International UniversityB.S., Ohio UniversityProgram Chairs – General EducationKyle Peacock, M.S. Healthcare Administration, University of UtahStory Stringer, M.S. Applied Science, University of ArkansasChriston Walker, M.S., University of UtahAssociate Dean – Freshman CoursesSita BellM.S., Utah State UniversityB.A., Utah State University To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 39
    • CalendarAcademic CalendarFriday, January 1, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Holiday (New Year’s Day) Friday, November 4, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Twelve EndsFriday, January 15, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Thirteen End Monday, November 7, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Thirteen BeginsMonday, January 18, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module One Begins Friday, December 2, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Thirteen EndsFriday, February 12, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module One EndsMonday, February 15, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Presidents Day)Tuesday, February 16, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Two Begins Holidays Martin Luther King DayFriday, March 12, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Two Ends Presidents DayMonday, March 15, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Three Begins Memorial DayFriday, April 9, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Three Ends Fourth of JulyMonday, April 12, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Four Begins Pioneer Day (Utah only)Friday, May 7, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Four Ends Labor DayMonday, May 10, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Five Begins ThanksgivingMonday, May 31, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Memorial Day) ChristmasFriday, June 4, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Five Ends New YearMonday, June 7, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Six BeginsFriday, July 2, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday – Module Six EndsMonday, July 5, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Seven BeginsFriday, July 30, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Seven EndsMonday, August 2, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eight BeginsFriday, August 27, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eight EndsMonday, August 30, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Nine BeginsMonday, September 6, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Labor Day)Friday, September 24, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Module Nine EndsMonday, September 27, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Ten BeginsFriday, October 22, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Ten EndsMonday, October 25, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eleven BeginsFriday, November 19, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eleven EndsMonday, November 22, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Twelve BeginsFriday, December 17, 2010 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Twelve EndsMonday, January 3, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module One BeginsMonday, January 17, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Martin Luther King Day)Tuesday, January 18, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Two BeginsFriday, January 28, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module One EndsMonday, January 31, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Three BeginsMonday, February 21, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Presidents Day)Friday, February 25, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Modules Two and Three EndMonday, February 28, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Four BeginsFriday, March 25, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Four EndsMonday, March 28, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Five BeginsFriday, April 22, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Five EndsMonday, April 25, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Six BeginsFriday, May 20, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Six EndsMonday, May 23, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Seven BeginsMonday, May 30, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Memorial Day)Friday, June 17, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Seven EndsMonday, June 20, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eight BeginsMonday, July 4, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Independence Day)Friday, July 15, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eight EndsMonday, July 18, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Nine BeginsFriday, August 12, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Module Nine EndsMonday, August 15, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Ten BeginsMonday, September 5, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Holiday (Labor Day)Friday, September 9, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Ten EndsMonday, September 12, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eleven BeginsFriday, October 7, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Eleven EndsMonday, October 10, 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Module Twelve Begins 40 Stevens-Henager College
    • SHC Legal ControlSHC Legal ControlStevens-Henager College, Inc. legally controls Stevens-Henager College.Officers of the corporation are Carl B. Barney, President and Peggy Run-nels, Secretary; Directors are Carl Barney, Peggy Runnels, Yaron Brook,and Miles Branch. CollegeAmerica Denver, CollegeAmerica Arizona, andCalifornia College San Diego, separate corporations, are affiliated withStevens-Henager College.***Calendar is subject to change***All images are stock photography or property of the college.© 2011 Stevens-Henager College. All rights reserved. Published October2010, good through and including June 2011.Revised March 1, 2011.No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or byany means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, orany information storage and retrieval system, without written permission fromStevens-Henager College.Stevens-Henager College makes every effort to present information about thecollege, its programs, and its services accurately and fairly. Those responsiblefor the preparation of this Catalog and all other public announcements anddocuments have made every attempt to ensure that the information presentedis correct and up-to-date. This document supersedes all previous documenta-tion and is subject to change. Stevens-Henager College reserves the right toadd, amend, or repeal any rules, regulations, policies, tuition, and proceduresand to change curriculum. Stevens-Henager College will not assume responsi-bility for publication errors beyond its control. The information contained inthis Catalog is subject to change at the discretion of Stevens-Henager Collegewithout prior notification. In the event of any inconsistency between the infor-mation contained in this Catalog and any other material, the information con-tained in the Catalog (including any addenda) shall take precedence. Stevens-Henager College is not responsible for information or oral claims made byindividuals that are contrary to Stevens-Henager College published materials. To enroll, go to www.stevenshenager.edu or call 800-279-3498 41