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Psych 710 syllabus, queens college 2012 assignments
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  • 1. Course Syllabus: Psychology 710 Advanced Physiological Psychology I Fall 2012 Course Title: Advanced Physiological Psychology I Department: Psychology Instructor: Joshua C. Brumberg, Ph.D. E-mail: Joshua.brumberg@qc.cuny.edu Meeting time: Monday, 9:15AM-12:05PM Office Hours: by appointment Room: SB A-302 COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course deals with the behavioral and physiological basis of sensory perception and the execution of motor actions. COURSE OBJECTIVES:  Understand signal transduction for the various sensory systems.  Comprehend the neuronal mechanisms underlying sensory perception.  Understand the neuronal basis of motor planning and action. Textbook: Principles of Neural Science. 4th edition, Eric R. Kandel, James H. Schwartz, Thomas M. Jessel, editors, McGraw Hill, NY 2000. ISBN 0838577016 / 9780838577011 Assigned weekly readings (see schedule below). PDF files of articles are posted on Blackboard. Grading: Exam 1 22/18/15%* Exam 2 22/18/15%* Exam 3 22/18/15%* Abstract for final project 5% Final project 15% Presentation x 2 10% each Participation 5% *The highest grade of the three exams will be weighted 22%, the intermediate weighted 18%, and the lowest weighted 15%. Extra Credit – a third presentation can be done to add a maximum of 5% to your final grade. GRADE SCALE: A+ 97-100, A 94-96, A- 90-93 B+ 87-89, B 84-86, B- 80 - 83 C+ 77-79, C 74-76, C- 70 – 73 F below 70 is failing. CLASS PARTICIPATION: Each student is expected to come to class prepared (having read the weeks’ assigned readings) to participate. 1
  • 2. Academic dishonesty (on exams, presentations or the final project) will result in an F for the course. (for doctoral students): The Graduate Center of The City University of New York is committed to the highest standards of academic honesty. Acts of academic dishonesty include—but are not limited to—plagiarism, (in drafts, outlines, and examinations, as well as final papers), cheating, bribery, academic fraud, sabotage of research materials, the sale of academic papers, and the falsification of records. An individual who engages in these or related activities or who knowingly aids another who engages in them is acting in an academically dishonest manner. Anyone suspected of academic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action and will be reported to The Graduate Center’s Department of Psychology Executive Officer Maureen O' Connor, Ph.D., J.D. (moconnor@gc.cuny.edu). ACADEMIC HONESTY (for Master’s students): Queens College of the City University of New York is committed to the highest standards of academic honesty. Acts of academic dishonesty include—but are not limited to—plagiarism, (in drafts, outlines, and examinations, as well as final papers), cheating, bribery, academic fraud, sabotage of research materials, the sale of academic papers, and the falsification of records. An individual who engages in these or related activities or who knowingly aids another who engages in them is acting in an academically dishonest manner. Anyone suspected of academic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action and reported to the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs (Vpsa@qc.cuny.edu). If you have additional questions please read the following information or contact me: http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/Psychology/questions/integrity.html http://www.plagiarism.org/ Ask me if you have questions about citing sources. Cell Phones: Cell phones going off in class are extremely disruptive and annoying. Each student will get one free pass, if your cell phone rings/buzzes aloud the first time there will be no penalty. If your phone rings/buzzes additional times you will be docked 3(n-1) points from your final grade, where n=the number of cell phone ringing/buzzing incidents. Therefore please set your phones for silent operation. Texting is NOT allowed during class or during exams. If you are found texting during an exam you will receive an automatic zero (0) for that exam. Guidelines for Presentations: Your job will be to summarize the assigned article in detail (see below), and to relate it to what we have discussed in lectures. Your presentation should be 15 to 20 minutes in length. You are free to supplement your presentation with other sources cited in the article. You may also provide the group with a written summary, if you think that helps your presentation. Come prepared with questions/topics of discussion for the class. The rest of the class should come prepared for discussion: do not expect the leader to simply regurgitate the paper for you. You must use PowerPoint or some other readily available computer software for your presentation. The dry erase board or other methods can also be used to enhance your presentation. Presentations are due 24 hours in advance of class (no late exceptions) and 2
  • 3. should be emailed to Prof. Brumberg (joshua.brumberg@qc.cuny.edu) so they can be posted on Blackboard. You should use the following checklist when preparing your presentation. I will grade presentations systematically using this checklist:  Correctly state the full reference to the material you are presenting.  Briefly describe the main components of your presentation (introduction, aim, methods, results, discussion, evaluation etc.).  Summarize the Introduction of the article concisely and accurately, making sure to describe the motivation for the study (big picture, why is it an interesting topic, etc).  State the aim(s) of the study.  Correctly and concisely describe the Methods, including the experimental design and dependent and independent variables.  Correctly and concisely describe the Results. Describe graphs of data correctly, including trends and variability in data and indicate whether or not experimental control was achieved.  All figures must be presented such that they are clear and legible on the screen.  Correctly and concisely describe the Discussion, including main conclusions and implications of the findings.  Provide your own evaluation of the study (Improvements? Unanswered questions?)  Relate the article to the course (this can be done at any point in the presentation).  Invite questions from the class. Summarize questions for the class if not easy to hear, answer questions clearly and concisely (It is OK to say you do not know the answer or invite commentary from other group members).  Overall style: Slides and Speaking – Do not paste large chunks of text from the article into your slides – summarize in your own words. Speak clearly and audibly to the back of the class, not down at your notes; make eye contact with class members periodically. Articles are fair game for the exams, so if you don’t understand something that someone is presenting, it is your responsibility to ask questions until you do! 3
  • 4. Guidelines for Final Project: Pick a current topic related to something we have discussed or will be discussing in the class, for which there are competing explanations in the literature. Write a 5-7 page paper on the topic (not including references), 1.5-spaced. Papers must be submitted in class and via email. You should use no fewer than 7 published articles as references (Wikipedia is not a legitimate source). Abstracts (250-300 words) for the paper (worth 5% of your final grade) should be submitted for approval no later than October 17. Late abstracts and papers will receive grades of zero. In addition, make sure to:  Present the topic/research question/thesis clearly in the beginning of the paper  Summarize and integrate the results from cited articles  Explain how you think the results favor one or more of the competing explanations  Present interesting, unanswered questions that your findings have raised, and describe possible experiments you could design to address them. Do not overlook this component. Please list references on a separate page at the end of the paper (not included in the 5-7 page count), listed alphabetically using these formats: Journal article format: Fernandez-Ruiz, J., Diaz R. (1999) Prism Adaptation and Aftereffect: Specifying the Properties of a Procedure Memory System, Learning & Memory, 6: 47-53. Book format: Goldstein, E.B. (2002) Sensation and Perception (4th Edition). Pacific Grove, CA: Wadsworth. For reference help contact: Amy Ballmer Reference Librarian, Mina Rees Library The Graduate Center City University of New York aballmer@gc.cuny.edu 212.817.7059 Psychology Subject Guide: http://libguides.gc.cuny.edu/psychology SCHEDULE OF CLASSES AND TOPICS (Additional readings available on Blackboard) Week 1 – August 27: Sensory Systems: Olfaction and Gustation Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science, Chapter 32 Review syllabus Sign up for presentations No Presentations Week 2 – September 3: No class Labor Day Holiday School Closed Week 3 – September 10: Sensory Systems: Somatosensation Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Chapters 22, 23 Additional Readings: 4
  • 5. Gardner, E.P., Palmer, C.I. Simulation of motion on the skin. II. Cutaneous mechanoreceptor coding of the width and texture of bar patterns displaced across the OPTACON. J Neurophysiol, 62:1437-1460, 1989. Simons DJ, Carvell GE. Thalamocortical response transformation in the rat vibrissa/barrel system. J Neurophysiol. 61(2):311-30, 1989. Jason Week 4 – September 17: NO Class Rosh Hashonah Week 5 – September 24: Sensory Systems: Pain and Analgesia Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Chapter 24 Additional Readings: Craig, A.D. and Bushnell, M.C. The thermal grill illusion: Unmasking the burn of cold pain, Science, 265:252-255, 1994. - Ewa Tominaga, M., Caterina, M.J., Malmberg, A.B., Rosen, T.A., Gilbert, H., Skinner, K., Raumann, B.E., Basbaum, A.I. and Julius, D. The cloned capsacin receptor integrates multiple pain- producing stimuli. Neuron, 21:531-543, 1998. Elizabeth Melzack, R. and Wall, P. Pain mechanisms: a new theory. Science, 150:971-9, 1965. Week 6 – October 1: Sensory Systems: Audition and Vestibular System Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Chapters 30, 31, 40 Additional Readings: Konishi, M. The Neural Algorithm for sound localization in the owl. Harvey Lectures, Series 86, 1992. Beata Carr C.E., and Konishi, M. A Circuit for detection of interaural time differences in the brain stem of the barn owl. The Journal of Neuroscience 10:3227-3246, 1990. Jariel MONDAY October 8, No class, Columbus Day Holiday School Closed Week 7 – WEDNESDAY October 10 EXAM 1 No lecture or presentations The first exam will be based on the first 5 weeks of lectures, readings and presentations. Week 8 – NO Class Society for Neuroscience Meeting Week 9 – October 22: Sensory Systems: Visual system 1 – Retina Abstracts for final project due Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Chapter 26 Additional Readings: Nicol, G.D., Miller W.H. Cyclic GMP injected into retinal rod outer segments increases latency and amplitude of response to illumination. PNAS, 75: 5217-5220, 1978. - Beata Brivanlou, I.H., Warland, D.K. and Meister, M. Mechanisms of concerted firing among retinal ganglion cells, Neuron, 20:527-539, 1998. - Week 10 – October 29: Sensory Systems: Visual system 2 – Thalamus/LGN and color vision Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science, Chapter 18 (341-344), Chapter 27 (523-532), Chapter 29 Additional Readings: 5
  • 6. Usrey, W.M., Reppas, J.B., Reid, R.C. Paired-spike interactions and synaptic efficacy of retinal inputs to the thalamus, Nature, 395:384-387, 1998. - Jason Alitto, H.J., Weyan, T.G., Usrey, W.M. Distinct properties of stimulus-evoked bursts in the lateral geniculate nucleus, J. Neuroscience, 25(2): 514-523, 2005.- Adam Week 11 – November 5: Sensory Systems: Visual system 3 – Visual cortex and extra-striate pathways Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Chapter 27 (532-end), Chapter 28 Additional Readings: Salzman, C.D., Britten K.H.,.and Newsome, W.T., Cortical microstimulation influences perceptual judgments of motion direction. Nature. 346(6280):174-7, 1990. - Jariel Hubel, D.H., Wiesel T.N. Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat’s visual cortex. J. Physiology, 160:106-154, 1962. - Elizabeth Week 12– November 12: Sensory/Motor Systems: Plasticity within and beyond the visual system Textbook Readings: None Additional Readings: Shatz CJ, Stryker MP. Ocular dominance in layer IV of the cat's visual cortex and the effects of monocular deprivation. J Physiol. 281:267-83, 1978. - Ewa Merabet LB, Hamilton R, Schlaug G, Swisher JD, Kiriakopoulos ET, Pitskel NB, Kauffman T, Pascual-Leone A. Rapid and reversible recruitment of early visual cortex for touch. PLoS One, Aug 27;3(8):e3046, 2008. - Simons DJ, Land PW. Early experience of tactile stimulation influences organization of somatic sensory cortex. Nature. 326(6114):694-7, 1987. - Allison Week 13 – November 19: EXAM 2 No lecture or presentations The second exam will be based on the lectures, readings and presentations from Week 8 through Week 11. Week 14 – November 26: Sensory/Motor Systems: Spinal Cord Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Principles of Neural Science: Chapter 34 (pages 674-687) and Chapter 36 Additional Readings: Salimi, I., Martin, J.H. Rescuing transient corticospinal terminations and promoting growth with corticospinal stimulation in kittens. J. Neurosci. 24: 4952-4961, 2004. - Quidsia Devanne, H., Degardin, A., Tyvaert, L. et al. Afferent-induced facilitation of primary motor cortex excitability in the region controlling hand muscles in humans. Eur J Neurosci. 30:439-448, 2009. - Ilysa Week 15 –December 3: Motor Systems: Cortical and Subcortical Control of Movement Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Principles of Neural Science: Chapters 35, 38 Additional Readings: Georgeopoulous, A.P., Schwartz, A.B. and Kettner, R.E. Neuronal population coding of movement direction. Science, 233:1416-1419, 1986. - Adam Nguyen, Q-T., Kleinfeld, D. Positive feedback in a brainstem tactile sensorimotor loop, Neuron, 45:447-457, 2005. - 6
  • 7. Week 16 – December 10: Motor Systems: Functional analysis of the Basal Ganglia and Cerebellum Final project due at the BEGINNING of class Textbook Readings: Principles of Neural Science: Principles of Neural Science: Chapters 41, 42 Additional Readings: Kelly, R.M., and Strick, P.L. Cerebellar loops with motor cortex and prefrontal cortex of a nonhuman primate. J Neurosci. 23:8432-44, 2003. Allison Ros, H., Sachdev, R.N.S., Yu, Y., Sestan, N., and McCormick D.A. Neocortical Networks Entrain Neuronal Circuits in Cerebellar Cortex. J Neurosci. 29:10309-20, 2009. Ilysa Saka, E., Goodrich, C., Halrlan, P., Madras, B.K., Graybiel, A.M. Repetitive behaviors in monkeys are linked to specific striatal activation patterns. J. Neurosci. 24: 7557-7565, 2004. - Gradinaru, V., Mogri, M., Thompson, K.R., Henderson, J.M., Deisseroth, K. Optical Deconstruction of Parkinsonian Neural Circuitry. Science. 324:354-359, 2009. - Quidsia Final Period December 14-20 EXAM 3: The third/final exam will be scheduled by the Registrar and will be posted in the Psychology Dept Office, SB E318 and online on the Queens College Website. The third exam will be based on the lectures, readings and presentations from Week 14 through Week 16. 7