Queens College
Division of Education
Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education
Fall 2012 - 3 credits
Seems li...
Journal articles from peer review journals, which publish articles in the fields
of education and/or psychology, will be u...
Queens College is located in the diverse urban community of Flushing, in
the New York City borough of Queens. This course ...
CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity
Academic dishonesty is prohibited in the City University of New York and
is punishable b...
OVERVIW OF ASSIGNMENTS-Detailed guidelines and grading for each
assignment will be given separately)
1. Exams (20%)
There ...
5. Class Participation (10%)
a. Attendance and punctuality (5%)
Attendance in class is highly recommended. Missing class s...
Standards for professional documents
All professional documents must be machine printed in a clearly readable
12-point fon...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Eece 311 syllabus queens college fall 2012 children in cultural context ii learning and teaching

247
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
247
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Eece 311 syllabus queens college fall 2012 children in cultural context ii learning and teaching

  1. 1. Queens College Division of Education Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education Fall 2012 - 3 credits Seems like this course demands a lot of time... Course Syllabus Course Number: EECE 311 Course Title: Children in Cultural Context II: Learning and Teaching Instructor: Fathima Humera, Ph. D. Course Description: This course is part of semester III in the undergraduate initial certification sequence in Childhood Education, 1-6. This course will examine the major learning theories and general principles underlying effective instruction. Classroom structures and management, intelligence, learning styles, individual assessment, and the impact of culture and class will be explored. There is an intensive field component that allows students the opportunity to observe, teach and then reflects on their experiences with children. Required Text: Woolfolk, A. (2011). Educational Psychology: Active Learning Edition (11th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. 1
  2. 2. Journal articles from peer review journals, which publish articles in the fields of education and/or psychology, will be used in this course. Course Objectives: As a result of this course, students will be able to:  Understand how to teach purposefully and planned outcomes by using learning theory and applying it to the classroom and to the conjunction of lesson plans.  Be reflective learners, aware of their own biases, prejudices, and motivations.  To transcend these attitudes by understanding individual differences among students with diverse backgrounds. Apply their understanding of individual, linguistic, and cultural differences to their attitudes about teaching students from diverse backgrounds.  Articulate differences between typical and atypical behavior and learning patterns in order to individualize instructional approaches for their students.  Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practices of motivation and communication and their application to promoting student interest, cooperation, and achievement.  Utilize their understanding of human relationship skills to foster positive relationships with children, parents, and colleagues. Conceptual Framework: Queens College Principles for Educator Preparation (QC-7) 2
  3. 3. Queens College is located in the diverse urban community of Flushing, in the New York City borough of Queens. This course is aligned with the core value of the education unit of promoting equity, excellence, and ethics in urban schools and communities. More specifically, the education unit is committed to preparing teachers and educational professionals who: a) built inclusive communities that nurture and challenge all learners; b) demonstrate professionalism, scholarship, efficacy, evidence-based practice and reflection; and c) value diversity, democracy, and social justice This course is being offered by the Elementary and Early Childhood Education Department, which is part of the education unit at Queens College. The education unit seeks to promote equity, excellence, and ethics in urban education and is committed to developing competencies in all teacher preparation and other education professional candidates that will enable them to: 1) Hold high expectations for all learners, 2) Work as change agents to promote equity and social justice, 3) Foster nurturing and challenging democratic learning communities, and 4) Respect and honor diversity. This course is aligned with the education unit’s commitment to preparing educational professionals to work in diverse urban and suburban communities. Specifically, the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that candidates will develop/demonstrate upon the successful completion of this course are directly linked to the educational unit’s seven principles: 1) Discipline Specific Competencies, 2) Learning and Development, 3) Families and Urban Communities, 4) Diversity and Inclusion; and Democracy and Social Justice, 5) Language and Literacy, 6) Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, and 7) Technology. The Education Unit’s Core Values Equity: The Education Unit is committed to preparing teachers and other school personnel to build inclusive communities that nurture and challenge all learners. Excellence: The Education Unit is committed to preparing teachers and other school personnel who demonstrate professionalism, scholarship, efficacy, evidence-based practice, and reflection. Ethics: The Education Unit is committed to preparing teachers and other school personnel who value diversity, democracy, and social justice. 3
  4. 4. CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity Academic dishonesty is prohibited in the City University of New York and is punishable by penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion has provided at http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/provost/policies/index.html ADA Statement Students with disabilities needing academic accommodations should: (1) register by providing the appropriate documentation to the Special Services Office, Kiely 171; (2) bring a letter to the instructor indicating the need for accommodation and what type. This should be done during the first week of class. For more information about services available to Queens College students contact: Special Services Office, Kiely 171; (718) 997-5870 (8:00AM to 5:00PM) http://www.qc.cuny.edu/student_affairs/special_services.php Use of Student Work All teacher education programs in the state of New York undergo periodic reviews by accreditation agencies and the state Department of Education. For these purposes, samples of students’ work are made available to those professionals conducting the review. Student anonymity is assured under these circumstances. If you do not wish to have your work made available for these purposes, please let the professor know before the start of the second class. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated. 4
  5. 5. OVERVIW OF ASSIGNMENTS-Detailed guidelines and grading for each assignment will be given separately) 1. Exams (20%) There will be TWO examinations; Exam I will be a TAKE HOME EXAM and Exam II will be an IN CLASS EXAM. The questions on these exams will comprise of multiple choice and short answers. This will require in-depth understanding of the material. Be prepared for every class, take notes, and seek to apply concepts and theories as you work in the field. 2. Class Activities and Homework Assignments (30%) Each class meeting you will be completing class activities. These activities will be allotted points. If you miss a class session you will MISS your points; NO MAKE-UP FOR IN CLASS ACTIVITIES. Therefore, it is important that you are present for all the class sessions. There will be altogether approximately 15 In- class activities and Homework assignments. ALL HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS NEED TO BE TYPED. IN CLASS ACTIVITY MATERIAL WILL BE POSTED ON BLACKBOARD AND NEED TO BE PRINTED OUT BEFORE CLASS. If an In- Class activity is submitted on regular paper points will be taken out. 3. Observation Report (10%) You will be observing children in early childhood classrooms and writing a report about your observations. (see attached) 4. Research Paper and Presentation (20%) This assignment will be completed in groups of THREE to FOUR STUDENTS. You will be selecting your group members and working on an assigned topic throughout the semester. There are two parts to this assignment. Part I: WRITING A PAPER and Part II: PRESENTING the information gathered using Power Point to the class end of the semester. (see attached) 5
  6. 6. 5. Class Participation (10%) a. Attendance and punctuality (5%) Attendance in class is highly recommended. Missing class sessions will hinder your process of learning from and contributing to the class discussions. Students who are late or absent with legitimate excuses need to inform the instructor at least 24 hours ahead of time and provide documentation for the absence (feel free to email or call me). Note that TWO unexcused absences will lower your grade by one interval. When you attend class, you are expected to arrive on time. You are expected to attend the whole class session. b. Participation in class discussions (5%) It is important that you play an active role in class discussions. The purpose of class discussion is to give you opportunities to explore your thoughts, questions the concepts described, challenge your fellow classmates ideas (in a non-threatening manner), clarify questions that might arise. In order to maintain a cohesive learning community, we need to address each other’s questions and quarries in a respectful manner. I will be making a note of how much you participate (contribute to class discussions) in class. I NEED TO HEAR YOUR VOICE DURING CLASS DISCUSSIONS. 6. Reflective Journal (10%) Throughout the semester you will be responsible for maintenance of a Journal that addresses your understanding of the first course intention: Reflect on one's own experiences as a child and adult and relate these reflections to your personal and professional development. Your weekly journal is a tool to express your thoughts, feelings, and ideas about what you experiences as a child or what you see at the early childhood setting or what you read in your textbook or even what we discussed in class. Since these will be turned in weekly, it will form a platform for an ongoing dialogue with the instructor. If you are ABSENT on the day of a particular journal entry you will miss journal point for that day. 6
  7. 7. Standards for professional documents All professional documents must be machine printed in a clearly readable 12-point font (T). Part of your preparation as an Early Childhood Teacher is the careful attention to documentation of your work. Unless instructed otherwise all written materials you turn in should be considered professional documents that reflect your best ability to write. This means that your ability to write in a clear, effective, and cohesive manner will affect your final evaluation. Mutual Agreement 1. Communication. If you are experiencing any difficulty making sense of assigned readings or assignments in general, do not hesitate to come to me. I am available for consultation at any day and time that we mutually agree upon. If accommodations need to be made to help you learn with more ease, please inform me by the end of the second session. I will find ways to address your needs. 2. Collaboration. You will be working with a group throughout the semester. Working in groups gives you the opportunity to hear multiple perspectives and reach higher levels of understanding. Take an active role in making this happen. 3. Community. We are all part of a learning community. We are all learners and thinkers. Let us respect each other’s opinions, ideas and differences. 7

×