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Identifying Quality in After School STEM

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Power of Discovery: STEM2 Regional Innovation Support Provider

Power of Discovery: STEM2 Regional Innovation Support Provider

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  • Engaging, fun, leaves you with questions, intentional, audience in mind
  • I told you it was math and that it was relevant I had you predict what would happen. But it was boring!
  • Transcript

    • 1. + Identifying Quality in STEM After School Carol Tang, Ph.D. Director
    • 2. + Coalition for Science After School Toincrease quality and quantity of science for all youth in afterschool, summer, and out-of-school settings Tobridge the afterschool, STEM education and scientific communities
    • 3. +  Coalition for Science After School  www.afterschoolscience.org  Twitter: @SciAfterSchool  Find us on LinkedIn and Facebook  Carol Tang  Twitter: @CarolTang1
    • 4. Magic Trick
    • 5. Is this STEM? Is thisIs this STEAM? SHTEAM?
    • 6. What was great about this activity? good somewhat okay
    • 7. One-sided object
    • 8. What was great about this STEM activity? good somewhat okay
    • 9. How would you design a better STEM afterschool activity?
    • 10. Your answers
    • 11. How did we just apply our own lessons?• You addressed a question, a challenge.• You asked yourselves questions.• You worked hands-on.• You used materials.• You used tools.• You pursued your own ideas.• You worked in groups. – You communicated your ideas. – You listened to others, worked together.
    • 12. Photos from Google.com & Balazs H.
    • 13. STEM Afterschool
    • 14. STEM AfterschoolCareer development/Economic justice
    • 15. Scientific Thinking and Process SkillsObservingCommunicatingComparing and measuringOrderingCategorizingRelating Science Guidelines for Nonformal EducationInferring Carlson and Maxa 1997 4HApplying http://www1.cyfernet.org/prog/schl/science/4 h590.html
    • 16. So STEM and afterschool not so different
    • 17. Science LearningScience Learning Youth Development Youth DevelopmentCuriosityCuriosity ExplorationMotivationMotivation Shows initiativeResponsibilityResponsibility Self-determinationPersistencePersistence PersistenceScience CapableScience Capable MasteryIdentity Identity Sees ability to succeedAppreciationAppreciation RelevanceInterest Interest Engagement
    • 18. Which youth outcomes do you feelgood about for STEM afterschool?
    • 19. Science Learning Youth DevelopmentCuriosity ExplorationMotivation Shows initiativeResponsibility Self-determinationPersistence PersistenceScience Capable MasteryIdentity Sees ability to succeedAppreciation RelevanceInterest Engagement
    • 20. If those are our youth goals… how do we achieve them?
    • 21. Learning that is activeLearning that is collaborativeLearning that is meaningfulLearning that supports masteryLearning that expands horizons
    • 22. STEM in the classroom (NSTA)• Instructors use “hands-on, minds-on” using materials to experience active science.• Students are encouraged to ask questions and practice science skills.• Students learn how to find out and make up their own minds by experimenting and investigating how the world works rather than just memorizing facts.• Students science learning experiences are activity centered and use a mix of whole-class activities, large group presentations, working in groups, and in groups, and individual activities. presentations, working individual activities.
    • 23. LEARNING• Instructors use “hands-on, minds-on” using materials to experience active science.• Students are encouraged to ask questions and practice science skills.• Students learn how to find out and make up their own minds by experimenting and investigating how the world works rather than just memorizing facts.• Students science learning experiences are activity centered and use a mix of whole-class activities, large group presentations, working in groups, and individual activities.
    • 24. Learning that is activeLearning that is collaborativeLearning that is meaningfulLearning that supports masteryLearning that expands horizons
    • 25. MAPDDMuseums Afterschool: Principles, Data, and Design
    • 26. MAPDDMuseums Afterschool: Principles, Data, and Design
    • 27. MAPDDMuseums Afterschool: Principles, Data, and Design
    • 28. Learning that is activeLearning that is collaborativeLearning that is meaningfulLearning that supports masteryLearning that expands horizons
    • 29. How do you identify a high-quality program in ? (nutrition, conflict resolution, reading, etc.) What do you look for in a high- quality activity in ?
    • 30. Selection Checklist • Activities that fit within• Learning that is hands- instructor’s comfort on & inquiry based zones• Short, stand-alone • Activities that fit within sessions that are your program structure thematically connected • Activities that fit within• Limited & specific goals your program budget• Student-driven activities • Opportunities to assess learner progress
    • 31. May 2010CBASS
    • 32. TASC criteria to select STEM• Inquiry-based & hands-on • Use techniques appropriate• Involve youth in higher-order for a variety of learning thinking skills (decision- styles, esp. with making, planning, problem- underrepresented youth solving, reflecting) • Use affordable materials that• Include opportunities for are easy to find parental involvement • Easy to implement by staff• Provide opportunities for who have no science youth to learn about role background models • Address national STEM• Encourage youth to see standards themselves as learners • Provide appropriate content• Include a training component for urban, diverse audience
    • 33. Dimensions of SuccessFeatures of the Activity STEM Knowledge YouthLearning Engagement & Practices Development inEnvironment STEMOrganization Participation STEM Content Relationships LearningMaterials Purposeful Inquiry Relevance ActivitiesSpace Utilization Engagement with Reflection Youth Voice STEM
    • 34. STEM in the classroom (NSTA)• All students, regardless of age, gender, cultural or ethnic background, disabilities, aspirations, or interest and motivation are provided the opportunity to actively learn challenging science.• Students have frequent and consistent opportunities to participate in active science learning.• Teachers have opportunities to improve their science teaching through workshops, courses, planning sessions, coaching, and scheduled time to plan.• Teachers plan instruction that builds on what students know and think to increase students scientific understanding.
    • 35. Features of the Learning EnvironmentOrganization Materials Space Utilization• Are the activities • Are the materials • Is the space utilized in a delivered in an appropriate for the way that is conducive to organized manner? students, aligned with OST learning? the STEM learning goals, and appealing to the students?• Are materials available • Are there any and do transitions flow? distractions that impact the learning experience?
    • 36. Activity EngagementParticipation Purposeful Activities Engagement with STEM• Are students • Are the activities related • Are students doing the participating in all to the STEM learning cognitive work while aspects of activities goals? engaging in hands-on equally? activities that help them explore STEM content?• Are boys participating more than girls? Are some students dominating group work?
    • 37. STEM Knowledge and PracticesSTEM Content Learning Inquiry Reflection• Is STEM content • Are students • Do students have presented accurately participating in the opportunities to reflect during activities? practices of scientists, and engage in meaning- mathematicians, making about the engineers, etc.? activities and related content?• Do the students’ • Are students observing, comments, questions collecting data, building and performance during explanations, etc.? activities reflect accurate uptake of STEM content?
    • 38. Youth Development in STEMRelationships Relevance Youth Voice• Are there positive • Is there evidence that • Are students student-facilitator and the facilitator and encouraged to voice student-student students are making their ideas and interactions? connections between opinions? the STEM content, activities, students’ everyday lives and experiences? • Do students make meaningful choices that shape their learning experience?
    • 39. Activity EngagementParticipation Purposeful Activities Engagement with STEM• Are students • Are the activities related • Are students doing the participating in all to the STEM learning cognitive work while aspects of activities goals? engaging in hands-on equally? activities that help them explore STEM content?• Are boys participating more than girls? Are some students dominating group work?
    • 40. The Power of Discovery: STEM2 Visioning Team describes quality STEM in OST as:• Student-centered activities designed toengage and nurture student interest andcuriosity• Project and inquiry-based learning• Activities that complement the academiccurriculum and incorporate the practices of theCommon Core Standards and Next GenerationScience Standards• Offering integrated/ diversified subject matter• Offering equitable access to all students
    • 41. Student Outcomes:To implement student-centered, project-based and inquiry-driven STEMopportunities to:• Increase meaningful student engagementin STEM learning opportunities.• Increase student interest in additionalSTEM learning opportunities and careers.• Increase student knowledge andapplication (i.e. behavior change) of STEMcontent and processes in OST andcommunities.
    • 42. How well did your activity compare?
    • 43. Dimensions of SuccessFeatures of the Activity STEM Knowledge YouthLearning Engagement & Practices Development inEnvironment STEMOrganization Participation STEM Content Relationships LearningMaterials Purposeful Inquiry Relevance ActivitiesSpace Utilization Engagement with Reflection Youth Voice STEM
    • 44. Learning that is activeLearning that is collaborativeLearning that is meaningfulLearning that supports masteryLearning that expands horizons
    • 45. Science Learning Youth DevelopmentCuriosity ExplorationMotivation Shows initiativeResponsibility Self-determinationPersistence PersistenceScience Capable MasteryIdentity Sees ability to succeedAppreciation RelevanceInterest Engagement
    • 46. Magic Trick