Working with journals Laura Gallagher, Imperial College London [email_address]
Research communications at Imperial <ul><li>Four research media officers covering the College’s Faculties of Engineering, ...
Some handy sources of tip-offs <ul><li>Nature  now   alerts you if a paper ’ s been accepted as well as when a paper is du...
But … unwise to rely on journals for intelligence <ul><li>Many smaller journals don ’ t have the resources to tell you if ...
Back to basics <ul><li>Get to know  as many of your researchers as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Explain to them  how much not...
Build relationships with key journals <ul><li>Find out  where your key researchers tend to publish  their work and get to ...
Scratching each other’s backs <ul><li>For institutions ’  press officers: </li></ul><ul><li>Keep the journal ’ s press off...
Scratching each other’s backs <ul><li>Suggestions for  journals  with limited resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Send a stan...
Timing: working out when a paper can go public <ul><li>Try the journal ’ s  press office   </li></ul><ul><li>If there is n...
Aaarrgghh moments Journal contact has no way of knowing  when the study will appear Study is published online  as soon as ...
Possible saviours of story and sanity <ul><li>If already published online but not in print: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Check if...
Thank you [email_address] @ImperialSpark
Rachel Twinn Press Officer
Nature Publishing Group JOURNAL PRESS RELEASE SENT EMBARGO Nature Thursday PM Wednesday 1800 Research journals Tuesday PM ...
Dear Author,   Your paper ‘«Title»’ has now been  scheduled for Advance Online Publication (AOP) on www.nature.com/nature ...
Dear Colleague,   I am writing to inform you that “«Title»” by «Name»  has been scheduled for Advance Online Publication (...
Things you can do <ul><li>Speak to academics – encourage them to speak to you </li></ul><ul><li>Identify academics who cov...
When it works well Genetics: Genetic variants associated with schizophrenia *PRESS BRIEFING*   [1] DOI: 10.1038/nature0818...
 
 
Promoting Wiley-Blackwell journal articles to the media <ul><li>What we publish </li></ul><ul><li>Our publicity structure ...
What we publish <ul><li>Over 1,500 journals </li></ul><ul><li>182,000 journal articles published in 2010 </li></ul><ul><li...
What we publish <ul><li>Agriculture Biotechnology Cell/Molecular Biology </li></ul><ul><li>Chemistry Earth Science Environ...
Our publicity structure <ul><li>Wiley-Blackwell structure = 4 divisions  </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Sciences Life Sciences ...
Our publicity structure  <ul><li>Each Publicist works with division marketing team </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for over ...
Why we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>To drive global, local profile of journal </li></ul><ul><li>To drive usag...
How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>We identify articles with publicity potential in a number of ways: </li><...
How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>We are looking for…… </li></ul><ul><li>Timely articles </li></ul><ul><li>...
How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>Article identified  Marketing/Publicity decide on potential – global,  </...
How we work with press offices <ul><li>Press office contacts W-B to inform they are releasing publicity on an authors arti...
How we work with press offices <ul><li>If Press Office goes alone with publicity, W-B can provide: </li></ul><ul><li>Exact...
How we work with press offices <ul><li>A case study…..  </li></ul><ul><li>Biotechnology Journal </li></ul><ul><li>W-B work...
What more can we both do to improve dissemination? <ul><li>What are the top areas of research in your institution? – what ...
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SCC2011 - Journals - All

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  • - e.g. PNAS alerts usually drop late afternoon on Wednesday in the UK, with a Monday evening embargo - so you have about two working days to research a release, draft it, check it with the researchers, haggle over all the jargon they want to put back in, liaise with other institutions, get a final draft sorted before Monday morning - AND deal with what you already had on your plate and the usual nightmare media query that drops on a Friday afternoon
  • As each research media officer has hundreds of academics to look after, we don ’ t have the resources to trawl through papers and we rely on academics alerting us - but other organisations may have tips about where they go digging to find out what ’ s coming up
  • Point of building relationships is so that when a researcher says they‘ve had a paper accepted in the journal of little green men, you’ll immediately know who to call, what the likely turnaround will be, and how you might be able to work with the journal to maximise the interest in that study
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  • SCC2011 - Journals - All

    1. 1. Working with journals Laura Gallagher, Imperial College London [email_address]
    2. 2. Research communications at Imperial <ul><li>Four research media officers covering the College’s Faculties of Engineering, Medicine, Natural Sciences and our Business School </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating about the work of around 3,000 academics </li></ul><ul><li>Three key ways in which working with journals helps us: Intelligence about what’s coming up Timing information </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing resources and expertise </li></ul>
    3. 3. Some handy sources of tip-offs <ul><li>Nature now alerts you if a paper ’ s been accepted as well as when a paper is due to be published </li></ul><ul><li>Eurekalert ( www.eurekalert.org ) gives tip-offs about upcoming papers in the following: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Journals (Updated Thursdays) BioScience (Updated monthly) Cell Press Journals (Updated Tuesdays) JAMA and Archives (Updated on Thursdays) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Updated Wednesdays) Rockefeller University Press Journals (Updated Tuesdays) Science , Science Translational Medicine and Science Express (Updated Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays) Society for Neuroscience Journals </li></ul><ul><li>Some journals will allow you to sign up for their embargoed press releases - e.g. Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine . </li></ul>
    4. 4. But … unwise to rely on journals for intelligence <ul><li>Many smaller journals don ’ t have the resources to tell you if one of your authors is publishing a paper </li></ul><ul><li>Even some of the bigger journals with slick operations can only alert you a few days in advance </li></ul>
    5. 5. Back to basics <ul><li>Get to know as many of your researchers as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Explain to them how much notice you will need ahead of a study being published </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage them to drop you a line if they have an interesting paper accepted by a journal </li></ul><ul><li>Reassure them about embargoes </li></ul><ul><li>Put resources in place e.g. on your website that explain how you work and how to work with you , to help prevent them contacting you two weeks too late </li></ul><ul><li>Get to know your organisation - do your authors record what research is being submitted, e.g. via their department or their funding body? </li></ul>
    6. 6. Build relationships with key journals <ul><li>Find out where your key researchers tend to publish their work and get to know the relevant people at those journals </li></ul><ul><li>Get to know how they work </li></ul><ul><li>Are their papers usually published on a particular day or week ? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a usual embargo time ? </li></ul><ul><li>How long is the journal ’ s usual process - from submission, to acceptance, to final proofs, to online publication, to print publication? </li></ul><ul><li>Do they issue their own press releases ? </li></ul><ul><li>If so, in what format ? Can you see a copy/have input? </li></ul><ul><li>Do they have a press site where you can put your own press release? </li></ul>
    7. 7. Scratching each other’s backs <ul><li>For institutions ’ press officers: </li></ul><ul><li>Keep the journal ’ s press office in the loop about what you ’ re planning, publicity-wise </li></ul><ul><li>Explore how you might work together , e.g. if you ’ re planning a media briefing </li></ul><ul><li>Send them a copy of the press release for their records </li></ul><ul><li>Copy them in when you tell your author about the media coverage a study has had </li></ul>
    8. 8. Scratching each other’s backs <ul><li>Suggestions for journals with limited resources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Send a standard email to all authors, suggesting they alert their press officer when they have a paper accepted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Help authors understand that it ’ s ok to tell their press officer about a study, even if it ’ s under embargo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alert an institution ’ s press office when you do a press release about the work of one of their authors </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Timing: working out when a paper can go public <ul><li>Try the journal ’ s press office </li></ul><ul><li>If there is no press office, do some digging - you might not find the right contact person online but you should be able to find a contact </li></ul><ul><li>What does your author know? Who ’ s their contact? Will they be kept informed about when the paper ’ s due to be published? </li></ul><ul><li>Bear in mind that smaller journals may not be used to dealing with the media and embargoes </li></ul><ul><li>For significant findings, a journal may be willing to work with you to set a more effective embargo date and time </li></ul>
    10. 10. Aaarrgghh moments Journal contact has no way of knowing when the study will appear Study is published online as soon as it’s accepted Author contacts you two weeks after publication
    11. 11. Possible saviours of story and sanity <ul><li>If already published online but not in print: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Check if the story ’ s been picked up anywhere - very few media outlets trawl obscure journals for stories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider pegging your news release around the print publication of the journal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don ’ t create a false embargo, but do send it out the day before the print publication date (e.g. “ according to a study published tomorrow in the Journal of Little Green Men / in the June edition.. ” ) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If online and print publication dates have both passed, consider other outlets - e.g. Sunday papers, features </li></ul><ul><li>Use the opportunity to explain to the researcher how much advanced warning you need next time </li></ul>
    12. 12. Thank you [email_address] @ImperialSpark
    13. 13. Rachel Twinn Press Officer
    14. 14. Nature Publishing Group JOURNAL PRESS RELEASE SENT EMBARGO Nature Thursday PM Wednesday 1800 Research journals Tuesday PM Sunday 1800 Nature Communications Thursday AM Tuesday 1600 Society titles Ad hoc Set by journal
    15. 15. Dear Author,   Your paper ‘«Title»’ has now been scheduled for Advance Online Publication (AOP) on www.nature.com/nature on «Publication» at 1800 London time / 1300 US Eastern time . The embargo will lift at this time. Please forward this information to any co-authors.   Papers published online before they have been allocated to a print issue will be citable via a digital object identifier (DOI) number. The DOI for your paper will be 10.1038/nature «DOI» . Once the paper is published electronically, the DOI can be used to retrieve the abstract and full text from the Nature web site (abstracts are available to everyone, full text only to subscribers) by adding it to the following URL: http://dx.doi.org/ .   A week before publication, Nature distributes a press release highlighting papers of general interest. Journalists are given the name of the author(s) to contact, together with phone and e-mail addresses. At this time, journalists are also given online access not only to the papers on the press release but to all the papers due to appear. This means that your work could well receive media interest even if not featured on the press release.   You are free to discuss your paper with the media, but we ask you to do this no more than a week before the publication date, and to ensure that Nature ’s embargo conditions are understood by journalists and others. Nature reserves the right to halt the consideration or publication of a paper if these conditions are broken. Journalists are permitted to show papers to independent specialists a few days in advance of publication, under embargo conditions, solely for the purpose of commenting on the work described.   Wire services stories must always carry the embargo time at the head of each item, and may not be sent out more than 24 hours before that time.   Journalists should seek to credit the relevant Nature publication as the source of stories covered.   If you need further clarification about anything related to publicity, please contact one of the Nature offices, as indicated below.   From North America Neda Afsarmanesh, Nature New York Tel: +1 212 726 9231; E-mail: [email_address]   For Japan, Korea, China, Singapore and Taiwan Mika Nakano, Nature Tokyo Tel: +81 3 3267 8751; E-mail: [email_address]   For the UK/Europe/other countries not listed above Rachel Twinn, Nature London Tel: +44 20 7843 4658; E-mail [email_address]   For any queries concerning proofs or corrections, please contact the Editorial Production department in London.   Yours sincerely,     Rachel Twinn Nature Press Office Tel: +44 207 843 4658 Fax: +44 207 843 4951 E-mail: r.twinn@nature.com  
    16. 16. Dear Colleague,   I am writing to inform you that “«Title»” by «Name» has been scheduled for Advance Online Publication (AOP) on www.nature.com at 1800 London time / 1300 US Eastern time on «Publication» . If you wish to see the paper, the author(s) should be able to provide you with a copy, and also to confirm that this title (taken from an early proof of the paper) remains unaltered.   You are receiving this letter because one or more of the authors are affiliated to your institution and/or because your organization provided funding for the research.   The full listing of authors and their affiliations for this paper is as follows:   «Authors»   The following funding acknowledgements from the authors appear at the end of the paper:   «Funders»     The introduction of regular AOP means that selected papers will be subedited and formatted and then published online as soon as they are ready. Papers published online before they have been allocated to a print issue will be citable via a digital object identifier (DOI) number. The DOI for the above paper will be 10.1038/nature«DOI» . Once the paper is published electronically, the DOI can be used to retrieve the abstract and full text from the Nature web site (abstracts are available to everyone, full text only to subscribers) by adding it to the following URL: http://dx.doi.org/ . Embargoes for papers published in this way will lift at the time of electronic publication   A week before publication Nature distributes a press release highlighting papers of general interest. Journalists are given the name of the author(s) to contact, together with phone numbers and e-mail addresses. At this time, journalists are also given online access not only to the papers on the press release but to all the papers due to appear.   We would be delighted to cooperate with you in ensuring maximum publicity for this paper. We request, however, that you do not send out your own publicity more than a week ahead of electronic publication, as we have found that excessively early publicity can jeopardize an embargo.   Please do not post to third-party internet journalist resource sites (such as EurekAlert or AlphaGalileo) until 48 hours before publication. Wire services stories must always carry the embargo time at the head of each item, and may not be sent out more than 24 hours before that time. Journalists should seek to credit the relevant Nature publication as the source of stories covered. It would be helpful if you could make these conditions clear in your own publicity, as well as expressing 1800 London time / 1300 US Eastern Time in your own local time.   Authors are free to discuss their paper with the media, but we ask them to do this no more than a week before the publication date, and to ensure that Nature ’s embargo conditions are understood by journalists and others. Journalists are permitted to show papers to independent specialists a few days in advance of publication, under embargo conditions, solely for the purpose of commenting on the work described.   Nature reserves the right to halt the publication of a paper if these conditions are broken.   If further clarification is required, please consult our embargo policy on the web, http://www.nature.com/author/embargo.html , or contact one of the Nature offices, as indicated below:   For North America and Canada Neda Afsarmanesh, Nature New York Tel: +1 212 726 9231; E-mail: [email_address]   For Japan, Korea, China, Singapore and Taiwan Mika Nakano , Nature Tokyo Tel: +81 3 3267 8751; E-mail: [email_address]   For the UK/Europe/other countries not listed above Rachel Twinn, Nature London Tel: +44 20 7843 4658; E-mail [email_address]  
    17. 17. Things you can do <ul><li>Speak to academics – encourage them to speak to you </li></ul><ul><li>Identify academics who cover press worthy topics </li></ul><ul><li>Track time frames of papers </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare early </li></ul><ul><li>Tap into other sources, e.g. librarians </li></ul><ul><li>Contact Nature </li></ul>
    18. 18. When it works well Genetics: Genetic variants associated with schizophrenia *PRESS BRIEFING*   [1] DOI: 10.1038/nature08185 [2] DOI: 10.1038/nature08186 [3] DOI: 10.1038/nature08192   Three papers in Nature this week provide new insights into genetic variation and schizophrenia risk. Using combined data from three large cohorts, the papers jointly reveal significant associations to individual loci that implicate immunity, cognition and brain development. Additionally, one of the papers provides genetic evidence for a substantial polygenic component to risk of schizophrenia that also contributes to risk of bipolar disorder. Pamela Sklar and the International Schizophrenia Consortium show that common genetic variation underlies risk of schizophrenia. Their study identifies common variants within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and provides molecular genetic evidence for a substantial polygenic component to risk of schizophrenia that involved thousands of common alleles of very small effect. These alleles of small effect also contribute to risk of bipolar disorder. Kari Stefansson and colleagues present a genome-wide association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and reveal significant associations to individual loci that implicate immunity, brain development, memory and cognition in predisposition to schizophrenia. Pablo Gejmans and the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia use a case-control study design to show an association between the MHC genomic locus and schizophrenia. Their results suggest a possible involvement of chromatin proteins in this disorder. Together, by using meta-analysis of almost 10,000 cases and 20,000 controls, these three studies indicate that although common genetic variation that underlies risk to schizophrenia can be identified, there are probably few or no single common loci with large effects. CONTACT Pamela Sklar (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA) Author paper [1] Tel: +1 617 726 0475; E-mail: [email_address]   Kari Stefansson (DeCODE Genetics, Regykjavik, Iceland) This author can be contacted through: Edward Farmer (Media Relations, DeCODE Genetics, Regykjavik, Iceland) Author paper [2] Tel: +44 779 601 0107; E-mail: [email_address]   Pablo Gejman (NorthShore University HealthSystem Research Institute, Evanston, IL, USA) Author paper [3] Tel: +1 224 364 7550; E-mail: [email_address]   Please note a press briefing related to these papers will be held UNDER STRICT EMBARGO at the World Conference of Science Journalism in London on Wednesday 01 July at 0930 London time (BST). Pablo Gejman, David Collier and Mick O’Donovan will discuss the significance of the findings, followed by a Q&A session. A recording of the briefing should be available to download from the press site after the event.
    19. 21. Promoting Wiley-Blackwell journal articles to the media <ul><li>What we publish </li></ul><ul><li>Our publicity structure </li></ul><ul><li>How we implement article-level publicity </li></ul><ul><li>How we work with press officers </li></ul><ul><li>What more can we both do to improve dissemination? </li></ul>
    20. 22. What we publish <ul><li>Over 1,500 journals </li></ul><ul><li>182,000 journal articles published in 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>2.2 million articles published since 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>4.6 million articles in total on Wiley Online Library </li></ul><ul><li>750 published on behalf/in affiliation with professional societies </li></ul><ul><li>70% ranked with a Thomson Reuter Impact Factor </li></ul><ul><li>35% of these in the top 10 of their subject category </li></ul>
    21. 23. What we publish <ul><li>Agriculture Biotechnology Cell/Molecular Biology </li></ul><ul><li>Chemistry Earth Science Environmental Science </li></ul><ul><li>History Medicine Material Science </li></ul><ul><li>Nursing Philosophy Physics </li></ul><ul><li>Veterinary </li></ul><ul><li>To name but a few………………… </li></ul>
    22. 24. Our publicity structure <ul><li>Wiley-Blackwell structure = 4 divisions </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Sciences Life Sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Sciences Social Science and Humanities </li></ul><ul><li>Publicity mirrors this: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Publicity Director </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Publicist (MS) Publicist (PS) Publicist (LS) Publicist (SSH) </li></ul></ul></ul>
    23. 25. Our publicity structure <ul><li>Each Publicist works with division marketing team </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible for over 200 journals </li></ul><ul><li>Plus book, database, other publication publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Publicists are an integral part of the marketing team – work in collaboration not in isolation </li></ul>
    24. 26. Why we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>To drive global, local profile of journal </li></ul><ul><li>To drive usage </li></ul><ul><li>To drive authorship </li></ul><ul><li>To drive profile of society </li></ul><ul><li>To drive membership of society </li></ul>
    25. 27. How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>We identify articles with publicity potential in a number of ways: </li></ul><ul><li>Through authors themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Editorial board/Editors in chief </li></ul><ul><li>Production Editors </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing (in response to economic/environmental issues) </li></ul>
    26. 28. How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>We are looking for…… </li></ul><ul><li>Timely articles </li></ul><ul><li>That reveal interesting, quirky stories </li></ul><ul><li>Based on groundbreaking research </li></ul><ul><li>That could impact on everyday society </li></ul>
    27. 29. How we implement article-level publicity <ul><li>Article identified Marketing/Publicity decide on potential – global, </li></ul><ul><li>local, national, scientific? Publicity compile release </li></ul><ul><li>Review by lead author/editor/society Translation as appropriate </li></ul><ul><li>Release to AlphaGalileo/EurekAlert Release to </li></ul><ul><li>national/international media contacts through global offices </li></ul>
    28. 30. How we work with press offices <ul><li>Press office contacts W-B to inform they are releasing publicity on an authors article. </li></ul><ul><li>Author informs their Press office that W-B is releasing publicity on article (we ask this of all authors we contact). </li></ul><ul><li>We often join forces to create joint release. </li></ul><ul><li>Gain greater exposure as W-B may have wider contacts in certain geographical regions </li></ul><ul><li>Gain wider exposure as W-B may translate for dissemination into selected countries. </li></ul><ul><li>Press office listed as interview contact </li></ul><ul><li>Press office gains exposure in local, internal media </li></ul>
    29. 31. How we work with press offices <ul><li>If Press Office goes alone with publicity, W-B can provide: </li></ul><ul><li>Exact online publication date </li></ul><ul><li>Correct journal citation including DOI </li></ul><ul><li>Contact with society officers/ editor in chief for comment/quote </li></ul><ul><li>Contact with other scientific advisors for comment/quote </li></ul>
    30. 32. How we work with press offices <ul><li>A case study….. </li></ul><ul><li>Biotechnology Journal </li></ul><ul><li>W-B worked with Newcastle University who wrote a release for article on Bacterial Olfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Newcastle distributed nationally </li></ul><ul><li>W-B distributed globally </li></ul><ul><li>Strong coverage including Nature, BBC and National Geographic in the UK </li></ul><ul><li>International coverage from US to India </li></ul>
    31. 33. What more can we both do to improve dissemination? <ul><li>What are the top areas of research in your institution? – what are the top journals publishing this research? – make contact with Publicist in these Publishing Companies. </li></ul><ul><li>Hold media centre day for Publicists at Publishing Companies – get to them in one hit! </li></ul><ul><li>If you are holding a press launch – invite Editor-in Chief, Society, Publisher Publicist. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider video cast for publicity – drives exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Is your author talking at conference – media conference pack in association with Publisher? </li></ul>

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