SCC 2014 - Day of discovery: Running your own public attitudes to science day

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Public Attitudes to Science 2014 (PAS 2014) is the fifth in the series of studies looking at the UK public’s attitudes to science, scientists and science policy. PAS 2014 mixed survey research with a …

Public Attitudes to Science 2014 (PAS 2014) is the fifth in the series of studies looking at the UK public’s attitudes to science, scientists and science policy. PAS 2014 mixed survey research with a range of qualitative research strands, one of which was our “Day of Discovery” workshop. The Day of Discovery aimed to get the public themselves to tell us the best ways to engage people with science, and to generate new ideas for scientists, science communicators and policymakers to connect with the public. Based on this event, we have created a toolkit giving tips on how to use the findings from the PAS 2014 survey to start debates about better engagement with science. This session will present the toolkit, and explore how it can be used effectively with different audiences.

Speakers: Kerry Seelhoff (BIS), Sarah Pope (Ipsos MORI), Ben Johnson (Graphic Science), Chair: Katherine Mathieson (British Science Association)

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  • What’s driving this, and (how) does it differ for different types of science? What types of science do they want to know more about and what level of detail are the interested in?
    What do they see as that contribution? How do they know and where do they find out?
    Do people want to know more? How would knowing more change how scientists are viewed?
    How does this effect people’s views on science and scientists? Do they want to know more?
    What should that public involvement look like and how should it look for different people?
    How does this effect people’s views on science and scientists? How can that trust be improved?
  • Small group activity (15 minutes) – My Science Journey
    Participants to do their science journeys as at the Day of Discovery (10 mins) then discuss as a group (5 mins)
     
    •Value of using PAS 2014 results for engagement – Sarah and Ben (15 mins)
    oFindings from Day of Discovery (Sarah)
    oParticipant experience video
    oResponse from Ben Johnson
    Max 3 slides of findings from the day + participant video of what they got out of it
    Questions/Short group activity – how could you/others use the toolkit? (5 mins)
  • Chapter themes
    Science information and communication (Chapter 2)
    Scientists’ work (Chapter 3)
    Trust in science (Chapter 4)
    Science and the economy (Chapter 5)
    Science journeys (Chapter 6)
    Science attitudes (Chapter 7)
    The best way to choose is to first come up with some objectives. For example, if you work in a university bioengineering department, you might want to start a debate about:
    How to make people better informed about bioengineering; and
    How to communicate the economic benefits of the bioengineering sector.
    Then you might want to use the materials in Chapter 2 and Chapter 5 to structure your event/workshop. You might also think that it would be good to just allow participants to quiz people who work on your lab about their work, so you could follow the advice in Chapter 3 as well.
    On the other hand, you might be a teacher, and want to use a science lesson to start your students thinking about science and the economy. You might only have a short time with the students, and as such just choose a few of the materials from Chapter 5, and ask students to look at the materials, then discuss three key questions in small groups, and report back to the larger group.
    The materials you choose should work for you: we have disseminated them in PowerPoint form so that you can customise them, and do feel free to use other sorts of stimulus materials if you want. If you get a chance, do let us know how your customised or additional materials worked!.
    Decide how many participants you’d like to engage and how you’re going to make sure that they turn up! For the Ipsos MORI Day of Discovery, it was important to get a really wide range of different people, across different ages, social grade and ethnicities, so people were asked to take part in the street by members of the Ipsos MORI team, and participants were given a small financial incentive to take part for at least 40 minutes. However many stayed for much longer and said they would have come along for free. You might be taking advantage of footfall, or be talking to a group during a scheduled class/lunch break, or you could be organising a bespoke event.
    Try to ensure that there’s something obvious ‘in it’ for participants; refreshments may help to draw people in if you’re relying on footfall, for students the chance to grill a working scientist about their job might be a selling point!
    Whatever you do, have a plan to make sure you get enough people along, and that you get the right people, by doing enough to make contact with your target audience in advance of your event.
    Before the day, make sure you have a large enough space, and the right set up for the types of activities you plan to do. If there are a few facilitators, have a meeting to make sure that everyone knows what their role is, and how you’re going to work together to ensure that participants engage with the materials and feel like they’ve all been heard. It can really help to do a checklist of the materials you’ll need on the day (an example is included in the Appendices).
    Using the materials
    The materials have been designed to be printed on A3 or A2 paper, and stuck to walls, to allow participants to read them and add their responses/ideas on post-its at their own pace.
    Participants should get a hand-out when they first arrive at your event/workshop or information point. Each person should also get some post-its, a pen and ideally a clip-board to allow them to capture their thoughts on the stimulus materials as they go along.
    When participants arrive
    Make sure people are greeted and have the purpose and structure of the workshop/event explained to them at the very start. There is an example hand-out in the materials that can be customised for you to give to your participants. Having refreshments available at this point also helps to put people at ease.!
    It can be helpful to record some basic demographic information about your participants, for example their age and gender, just so that you’ll know later who took part.
    Depending on the number taking part, giving people a name tag can help in group discussions. Give your facilitators a name tag as well, and vary the colours so that it is clear who participants can talk to if they have questions.
    TOP FACILITATIONS TIPS!
    All of the posters have a question at the end, to encourage the participants to think about the implication of the survey findings. These were the questions that were used at the PAS2014 Day of Discovery, but you can easily change the questions if you think different ones would better suit your objectives.
    In each of the relevant chapters, there are some prompts that might be helpful to get participants thinking and talking about the posters, the themes they cover and the questions they raise.
    If you want to engage participants in more in-depth discussions, either by carrying out interviews with individuals or pairs, or by facilitating a group discussion. If you do this, there are a few key things that it’s worth doing:
    Let people know what the objective of the discussion is at the start, and make sure they understand that you want to have a conversation with them – it’s not a quiz!
    Tell them how long the discussion lasts and try to stick to it where possible, especially as participants might be under time pressure.
    Allow people to talk – ask open questions, and then sit back and ignore the urge to follow up every single thing. Silence is your friend! Many will not have discussed science before so may need time and space to gather thoughts.
    Make sure everyone gets the chance to speak. It’s good to set ground rules at the start so that everyone knows what’s expected, and has a chance to agree rules for behaviour.
    If a participant says something incorrect about science, it is worth resisting the urge to correct them, and instead asking them where they heard that or why they believe it. If you do want to give the participant correct information, make sure that you do so in a sensitive and friendly manner so that they do not get embarrassed about having ‘got it wrong’.
    Make sure you thank participants, and give them opportunity to feed back on their experience. An example feedback form that can be handed out at the end of the event is included in the materials for you to use and customise.
    Capturing what your participants are saying
    There are several ways you can capture participants thoughts:
    On post-its, which they should stick on the relevant stimulus posters
    On worksheets (some are included for the activities outlines in Chapters 3 & 7, but you could also make your own)
    Hand-written notes taken by facilitators
    Recording the discussions to listen back to later (you need to tell participants very clearly what is going to happen to the recording, and gain their informed permission to record them)
    The science journey posters that participants make
    You will very easily forget what people say, so do try to capture as much as possible in as many ways as possible in order to gain the most from your event.
  • Optional extra: segmenting your participants
    We have included a short questionnaire and an Excel tool that allows you to quickly assign participants to one of the broad science attitudes as described above, based on their answers to 16 questions about science. At the PAS 2014 Day of Discovery, participants were given coloured name badges that denoted their overall science attitude.
    This allowed facilitators to ask tailored questions of people. It could also help you when thinking about your findings. For example, it may be that lots of people who have the ‘Concerned’ attitude are interested in TV programmes about the ethical implications of new science discoveries, while those in the ‘Late Adopter’ group had some useful ideas about how to get parents and kids talking about science together. Knowing which attitude group people belong to can help keep track of these kinds of differences.
    Instructions on how to use these tools are in the appendices.
  • Chat through some key findings from the Day of Discovery:
  • In fact, the 9th presentation of PAS 2011 will take place next Thursday at the 2012 British Pharmacological Society Winter Meeting
    The most recent tweet of PAS 2011 was in November, with someone saying the summary report was the most useful UK stats on this issue they had seen
    Ipsos MORI has 8837 Twitter followers and BSA Science in Society Team has 886
    5,538 unique page views of Ipsos MORI PAS 2011 webpage

Transcript

  • 1. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Running your own Day of Discovery Using the results of the PAS 2014 survey to spark a science debate! Kerry Seelhoff (BIS), Sarah Pope (Ipsos MORI), Ben Johnson, Graphic Science
  • 2. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI What this session will cover Introduction to PAS Day of Discovery and toolkit Activity – My Science Journey Using PAS 2014 for engagement Questions & discussion (at any time!)
  • 3. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Why we run Public Attitudes to Science? • Builds a better understanding of what the public think about science and technology in the UK. • Gauges public trust and governance of science and emerging technologies. • Increases our understanding of how people engage with science and their views on public involvement. • Informs BIS policy areas and the Government’s strategies for the Eight Great Technologies. • Contributes to the evidence base for BIS Science and Society team.
  • 4. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Overview of PAS 2014 research Survey research •1,749 UK adults aged 16+ and a booster sample of 315 16-24 year-olds interviewed in-home from July to November 2013 •Move to probability sampling (quota sampling in previous years) Survey research •1,749 UK adults aged 16+ and a booster sample of 315 16-24 year-olds interviewed in-home from July to November 2013 •Move to probability sampling (quota sampling in previous years) Qualitative research •Research with Ipsos MORI’s online community and social listening •Day of Discovery workshop with 100+ members of the public in London in January 2014 Qualitative research •Research with Ipsos MORI’s online community and social listening •Day of Discovery workshop with 100+ members of the public in London in January 2014 Fifth in the series •Wide range of objectives, covering what people think about science, scientists and science policy in the UK •Previously run in 2000, 2005, 2008 and 2011 (and data from earlier surveys) Fifth in the series •Wide range of objectives, covering what people think about science, scientists and science policy in the UK •Previously run in 2000, 2005, 2008 and 2011 (and data from earlier surveys)
  • 5. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Base (for 2014): 1,749 UK adults aged 16+ The UK public are as enthusiastic about science as they have ever been in the last 25 years. 72 We depend too much on science and not enough on faith It is important to know about science in my daily life The benefits of science are greater than any harmful effects Science makes our way of life change too fast 55 34 30 57 45 49 44 % agree in 1988 % agree in 2014
  • 6. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Many are still uncertain of how scientists go about their work Base: 1,749 UK adults aged 16+ think scientific research is never or only occasionally checked by other scientists before being published agree scientists adjust their findings to get the answers they want 35% 29%
  • 7. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Bases: c.900+ adults per wave Scientists and engineers are highly regarded … % strongly agree that scientists make a valuable contribution to society % strongly agree that, in general, scientists want to make life better for the average person
  • 8. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Q. How much, if at all, do you trust each of the following to follow any rules and regulations which apply to their profession? Base (for 2014): 858 UK adults aged 16+ … and more trusted than before, regardless of where they work 90 Scientists working for private companies Scientists working for Government Scientists working for universities Scientists working for charities Scientists working for environmental groups 88 79 74 60 84 77 72 5672 % trust in 2011 % trust in 2014
  • 9. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Q. To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Base: 1,749 UK adults aged 16+ People think scientists, regulators and government need to engage with the public when making decisions Those who regulate science need to communicate with the public The Government should act in accordance with public concerns about science and technology Scientists should listen more to what ordinary people think % agree % disagree 3
  • 10. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI People want to hear more directly from scientists and those who govern them Source: Day of Discovery workshop participant When you watch the news or read it, there is always someone manipulating them. You should have scientists from scientific bodies talking about it.
  • 11. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Source: Day of Discovery workshop participant (quote) and social listening (tweet) The messenger matters, with scientists seen as authority figures “Because politicians are playing the short- term game, it can have an effect on what they say about science.” “Smart remarks and selective use of evidence won’t feed 9bn by 2050. GM is one tool to try.” @EU_ScienceChief Tweet seen by largest audience on Twitter after online GM debate in summer 2013
  • 12. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Q. From which one or two of these, if any, do you hear or read about new scientific research findings most often? Bases: 1,749 UK adults aged 16+; 510 16-24 year-olds In a digital age, traditional media still matters, even online 59% TV 14% radio15% online newspapers/ news websites 6% social networks 23% print newspapers 19% among 16-24 year-olds19% among 16-24 year-olds Of whom, 69% mention BBC NewsOf whom, 69% mention BBC News
  • 13. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI % agree that “it is important to know about science in my daily life” Bases: c.150+ adults per generation per wave Some of the change over time comes from generational differences Pre-war generation (born before 1945) Baby boomers (born 1945-1965) Generation X (born 1966-1979) Generation Y (born since 1980)
  • 14. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Bases: 821 men; 928 women Finally, there are also gender differences % among women % among men % feel informed about science 34 56 % say they don’t really know what scientists do 24 15 % are/want to be more involved in decision-making about science issues 25 38 % agree school put them off science 30 17
  • 15. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Why a Day of Discovery? What the survey told us (and what it didn’t) The public continue to see science as important, are interested in finding out more People are positive about the contribution science makes to the UK economy Scientists and engineers are highly respected, but people do not know much about how scientists work The public lack awareness of how scientific research is funded Traditional media is still important, but there is low trust in science journalism Public involvement is important to the public • What’s driving this, and (how) does it differ for different types of science? • What do they see as that contribution? How do they know? • Do people want to know more? How would knowing more change how scientists are viewed? • How does this effect people’s views on science and scientists? • How can that trust be improved? • What should that public involvement look like for different types of people? An opportunity to gain public feedback on the results, and to dig deeper into some of the questions that the survey raises
  • 16. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Using the survey results to kickstart a conversation! What is the best way to communicate with the public about science? How does that differ for different types of people? What makes people informed about certain topics, and how can that be harnessed to make them interested in topics they are currently uninformed about? How can we help people better understand scientists and how they work? How can we facilitate greater trust in science and scientists among the less trusting? What would drive greater public support for investment in science and technology? The toolkit: using the PAS 2014 results to start conversations about science and science engagement with members of the public, and challenge them to come up with new and better ways of public engagement. ? ? ? ? ? 4 scientists 109 Participants 15 facilitators Hundreds of views about science and science engagement! PAS 2014 DAY OF DISCOVERY
  • 17. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI The PAS 2014 Day of Discovery
  • 18. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Using the toolkit Before the day: Decide some objectives, and find the materials that will help you meet them Print (customised) materials and discussion guides (and read the advice on how to use them) Find participants – how can you make the event more attractive to them Invite scientists and arrange and brief other organisers Remember the practicalities! On the day: Materials hung up around the room Information, post its and pens for participants Prompting and probing Facilitated interviews or focus groups Activities Participant feedback Capturing what participants say
  • 19. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Remember the segments! Who do you want to speak to? Can the segments help you make sense of what you find? Disengaged Sceptics were put off science at school, and today they find it overwhelming Disengaged Sceptics were put off science at school, and today they find it overwhelming The Concerned distinguish themselves through a more religious or spiritual outlook on life, informing views on science The Concerned distinguish themselves through a more religious or spiritual outlook on life, informing views on science Confident Engagers are strongly positive about the role of science in society, and already feel sufficiently engaged Confident Engagers are strongly positive about the role of science in society, and already feel sufficiently engaged Distrustful Engagers think science benefits society, but are less trusting of scientists and less confident of regulation Distrustful Engagers think science benefits society, but are less trusting of scientists and less confident of regulation Late Adopters did not enjoy science at school, but now take a strong interest, based on environmental and ethical concerns Late Adopters did not enjoy science at school, but now take a strong interest, based on environmental and ethical concerns The Indifferent do not feel informed about science, but are not especially interested or concerned either The Indifferent do not feel informed about science, but are not especially interested or concerned either
  • 20. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Activity – Create your science journey!
  • 21. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI What you’ll get out of using the toolkit – depends on your objectives! The aim of this toolkit is to facilitate a conversation about better science engagement. We’re hoping people will share their outputs, for example: •Photos/videos of the day (ask consent!) •A write up of what participants said •Communication and engagement ideas •Tips for others running similar events •Participants’ outputs (a word cloud of their post-its, their science journeys posters etc.) Whatever your objectives though, you should end the event with: 1) A better understanding of your participants’ experiences with and attitudes towards science 2) New ideas about how to inform and engage people about science to action or share Send outputs to pas2014tookit@ipsos.com, or tweet to @ipsosmori using the hashtag #pas2014
  • 22. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI What will participants get out of it? Source: Day of Discovery workshop participants
  • 23. Version 1 | Internal use only© Ipsos MORI Thank you kerry.seelhoff@bis.gov.uk sarah.pope@ipsos.com ben@graphicscience.co.uk