Keep calm andcarry onBecky Purvis
• Head of policy at the Association of Medical Research Charities• National membership organisation of charities funding m...
Embedding research in the NHS – launch of our vision for research in theNHS15 May 2013Investing in medical research for th...
We’ve heard a lot about being prepared for all eventualities large and small when holding an event.I’m going to focus on h...
Our priorities• Getting the right people to our events• Hosting constructive eventsDesign your event with these in mind• G...
Getting the people you want to be there
Designing your event:Be clear who your audience is– Make sure everyone is clear what you’re trying to achieve from the out...
Invites:Who do you invite?– Fill the room with interesting people, ensure it will be busy whether or not the people you’re...
Incentives to tempt people along:– This is where clear objectives tailored to your audience pays off– Marketing– put your ...
Holding an event in parliament raises some pretty unique challengesHolding an event in a very busy place• Run through ever...
Security• Arrange deliveries well in advance• Run through what you plan to bring with the events teamVictorian rooms, tigh...
Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on t...
Challenges:• Lost speakers– Maps– Arrange for them to arrive early– Take their mobile numbers, give them yours• The runawa...
Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker– Brief them thoroughly• Explain the aim of the meeting and where they fit•...
Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe– High possibility of flying visits and las...
Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on t...
Be clear about what you are trying to achieve from the outset– Events work better if they have a clear objective which you...
Becky PurvisHead of policyAssociation of Medical Research Charitiesb.purvis@amrc.org.ukThank you
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

SCC2013 - Keep calm and carry on: Practical tips on how to cope when public engagement events go wrong - Becky Purvis

269 views
183 views

Published on

Presentation from "Keep calm and carry on: Practical tips on how to cope when public engagement events go wrong" at the 2013 Science Communication Conference organised by the British Science Association - slides by Becky Purvis

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
269
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

SCC2013 - Keep calm and carry on: Practical tips on how to cope when public engagement events go wrong - Becky Purvis

  1. 1. Keep calm andcarry onBecky Purvis
  2. 2. • Head of policy at the Association of Medical Research Charities• National membership organisation of charities funding medical research in the UK. 124 members.• Work with our member charities and partners to support the sector’s effectiveness and advancemedical research by developing best practice, providing information and guidance, improvingpublic dialogue about research and science, and influencing government to ensure the bestresearch can go ahead and be translated into new treatments.• Run workshops, seminars, host awards, annual events – to share best practice, bring peopletogether, policy development, influence• Manage the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Medical ResearchAbout me
  3. 3. Embedding research in the NHS – launch of our vision for research in theNHS15 May 2013Investing in medical research for the UK’s future – A breakfast with Sir PaulNurse14 May 2013Annual Dinner - The interface between public, charity and industry funderswith David Willetts MP and Professor Mariana Mazzucato6 February 2013All-Party Parliamentary Group on Medical Research
  4. 4. We’ve heard a lot about being prepared for all eventualities large and small when holding an event.I’m going to focus on how to design events to achieve your objectives and reduce the risk of lastminute panics, with a particular focus on parliament which poses it’s own unique set ofchallenges..Never work with children, animals or politicians..
  5. 5. Our priorities• Getting the right people to our events• Hosting constructive eventsDesign your event with these in mind• Getting the people you want to be there• Logistics• Getting the most out of your speakersNever work with children, animals or politicians..
  6. 6. Getting the people you want to be there
  7. 7. Designing your event:Be clear who your audience is– Make sure everyone is clear what you’re trying to achieve from the outset– Are politicians really your audience?Timing– Pick a good time for your dream attendees– For politicians, not Monday morning, not midday Wednesday, not Friday. Check it’s notrecessType of event– What are your priorities?– Sit down meals particularly breakfasts work well if you want a focused discussion– afternoon receptions allow people to wander in and outGetting the people you want to be there
  8. 8. Invites:Who do you invite?– Fill the room with interesting people, ensure it will be busy whether or not the people you’reafter turn upHow many?– At receptions work on a third not showing up– For sit down meals – keep a reserve list, one or two always drop out last minuteRegister people with your audience in mind– Conference attendees might be happy to fill in a form, politicians invited to a breakfast/dinnerwant an email to RSVP to or a phone number to ring.– Acknowledge their registrationGentle reminders– No nagging, just reminding. Get people’s contact details when you register them and sendthem joining information a week ahead, if you have a good list of attendees share this -people won’t want to miss out if everyone else is there. There’s lots of great software about tohelp you do this – eventbrite etc – but they don’t work for all events.Getting the people you want to be there
  9. 9. Incentives to tempt people along:– This is where clear objectives tailored to your audience pays off– Marketing– put your feet in your dream attendees shoes and tell them why they need to comealong, what’s in it for them?– Think about what will tempt them along. Big speakers, photo-opps, topical discussionsGetting the people you want to be there
  10. 10. Holding an event in parliament raises some pretty unique challengesHolding an event in a very busy place• Run through everything with the banqueting team• Aim to think through all the steps and possible hiccups in advance. Ask their advice• Don’t be too ambitiousLast minute room changes/cancellations• Go armed with paper, pen and blu-tack• Be prepared to pull an event if necessary – make sure you collect contact details for everyonewhen you register them.Logistics
  11. 11. Security• Arrange deliveries well in advance• Run through what you plan to bring with the events teamVictorian rooms, tight timeslots• Think about plug sockets, windows, spaces to put tables – these rooms weren’t built forelectronics and presentations, sound doesn’t carry, people can end up behind pillars• If you want to bring display boards in, plan in advanceInterruptions• Division bells, clashes with big debates happen to everyone.Logistics
  12. 12. Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on topicGetting the most out of your speakersYou’ve sourced the perfect speakersthey’ve all agreed to join you on the dayyou’ve got a great chairyour dream attendees are going to be thereWhat could go wrong?BRIEFING
  13. 13. Challenges:• Lost speakers– Maps– Arrange for them to arrive early– Take their mobile numbers, give them yours• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on topicGetting the most out of your speakers
  14. 14. Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker– Brief them thoroughly• Explain the aim of the meeting and where they fit• Tell them what the room looks like, who is in the audience• Underestimate the time you are giving them to speak – they will run over• If possible talk to them beforehand– Brief your chair• Arrange for them to talk to speakers beforehand so they will be confident keeping themto time if necessary• Encourage them to introduce each speaker explaining what they will talk about– If possible, put plenty of wriggle-room in the agenda• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on topicGetting the most out of your speakers
  15. 15. Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe– High possibility of flying visits and last minute changes to when they will arrive and leave– Keep agendas flexible – don’t print until you have to• Keeping the conversation flowing and on topicGetting the most out of your speakers
  16. 16. Challenges:• Lost speakers• The runaway speaker• Ministers on a tight timeframe• Keeping the conversation flowing and on topic– Food and drink – even tea and biscuits gets people talking– Detailed briefings for the Chair – give them a list of people they can call on to discuss specifictopics, or to change topic/restart the conversation– Give attendees some written material to look through, a list of topics can be useful at roundtable discussions– At receptions, set up things to look at with people ready to answer questionsGetting the most out of your speakers
  17. 17. Be clear about what you are trying to achieve from the outset– Events work better if they have a clear objective which you, and those attending, canunderstand. Your target attendees are more likely to see the benefits for them and comealong, your speakers are more likely to keep to time if they understand where they fit in theoverall aims of the day.Assume nothing– Be flexible. Agendas, attendee lists and seating plans are likely to change right up until theday. Finalising and printing is sometimes best done closer to the time.– Get everyone’s contact details so you can make last minute changesNo one will notice when it goes wrong– Chopping and changing on the day is fine, the only person who will know it didn’t go to plan isyou.Food and drink– The best way to get people talking.Be lovely to everyoneTop tips
  18. 18. Becky PurvisHead of policyAssociation of Medical Research Charitiesb.purvis@amrc.org.ukThank you

×