Talking to communitiesabout heart health andresearch
Why?South Asian communities•Higher risk of developing heart disease than generalpopulation.•Twice as likely to develop dia...
Relevant fact &figures UK Times
Relevant casestudies
Relevantspokespeople
Celebrities
Be culturally aware• Calendar events• Cultural beliefs
Links withadvertising
Stronger researchmessaging• Fight for Every Heartbeat(7 pieces of coverage)• Mending Broken Hearts…..
Questions
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SCC2013 - Inclusive initiatives - Jenny Legg

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Presentation from "Inclusive initiatives" at the 2013 Science Communication Conference organised by the British Science Association - slides by Jenny Legg

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  • Coordinate media work with BME agency Here & Now
  • Higher risk Issues over awareness of risk
  • BHF BME media work is: 70% promoting BME projects/messages specifically about these groups 30% adapting ‘mainstream’ campaign messages and making them relevant Translation not always necessary. But, being relevant is key. Specific statistics, especially new ones, are a great media hook. Coverage is from press conference last autumn. Released new YouGov figures specific to UK Asian and African Caribbean communities
  • Examples from recent Fight for Every Heartbeat campaign. Michelle in The Gleaner Shamshad in Asian Lite (Manchester based publication but big reach) Used mainstream materials, plus relevant risk stats and case study stories
  • Prof Nishi Chaturvedi, BHF trustee and researcher at Imperial College London, was interviewed for Asian Star Radio about her research into diabetes in BME communities (SABRE study). Also interviewed for Woman’s Hour re heart disease in BME women. Jaspal Kooner, Professor of clinicial cardiology at Imperial College, interviewed for Eastern Eye. Working on ‘Lolipop’ study looking at why some people including Indian Asians are at higher risk of heart disease. This study received funding from the BHF.
  • Bonnie Greer spoke at heart health event in Southwark last year Singer and songwriter Tasha Tah supported our No Smoking Day messages (shisha focused) at a concert (Desi Dhamaka) in March Patty Dumplin, created character, devised by local partner agency in Nottingham. Larger than life chef who gently berates people into leading healthier lives Celebs don’t have to be A-list in a conventional sense to achieve cut-through
  • Know important dates in the calendar (means you’ll know where to find people and have a better idea of what they might be thinking of) Notting Hill Carnival – BHF sponsored float in 2011 Diwali menu for Pardes Weekly, to coincide with Diwali last year Understand concept of communities plural (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi) Importance of community leaders Understanding cultural barriers to your messaging eg. Fatalism, shisha smoking
  • Common for smaller, and some not so small, outlets to ask whether you’re doing any advertising with them while they’re considering whether to run your PR story. Not always just on merit of the story. Link with money is strong, especially in smaller outlets
  • BHF BME media work previously focused more on health prevention messaging. Now, much greater focus on bringing in science and research messaging to these groups Signs so far are good! Seven pieces of coverage for FFEH (essentially a research story) Now, Dr Samuel Boateng, BHF funded researcher at the University of Reading (researching heart failure) is one of our researchers currently on TV in our MBH adverts talking about how research can help heart failure.
  • SCC2013 - Inclusive initiatives - Jenny Legg

    1. 1. Talking to communitiesabout heart health andresearch
    2. 2. Why?South Asian communities•Higher risk of developing heart disease than generalpopulation.•Twice as likely to develop diabetes•40% of South Asians don’t realise their ethnicity increasestheir risk of diabetesAfrican Caribbean communities•Twice the risk of stroke as Europeans.•Highest risk of high blood pressure for ethnic minorities inthe UK•More than twice as likely to develop diabetes than thegeneral UK population•1 in 4 African Caribbean adults don’t realise their ethnicityincreases their risk of high blood pressure and diabetes
    3. 3. Relevant fact &figures UK Times
    4. 4. Relevant casestudies
    5. 5. Relevantspokespeople
    6. 6. Celebrities
    7. 7. Be culturally aware• Calendar events• Cultural beliefs
    8. 8. Links withadvertising
    9. 9. Stronger researchmessaging• Fight for Every Heartbeat(7 pieces of coverage)• Mending Broken Hearts…..
    10. 10. Questions

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