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Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching
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Omashani Naidoo: Peer coaching

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  • The Chalk-Talk activity is adapted from the Chalk Talk protocol, Coalition of Essential Schools Northwest. (2002). Chalk talk . Retrieved November 05, 2003 from http://www.cesnorthwest.org/CFG-protocols/chalk-talk.php
  • Working in the library
  • Transcript

    • 1. Peer Coaching<br />
    • 2. Peer Coaching - Introductions<br />The South African coaches<br />Brenda Hallowes (Eastern Cape - Port Elizabeth)<br />Claire Dean (Eastern Cape – East London)<br />Estia Warmenhoven (Limpopo)<br />Nomty Gcaba (KwaZulu Natal)<br />Sam Tobias (KwaZulu Natal)<br />Sarietjie Musgrave (Free State)<br />Saul Pila (Gauteng)<br />
    • 3. About Peer Coaching<br />National programme <br />between February – October<br />8 facilitator led workshops across 9 months<br />Built on three pillars: <br />Lesson Design<br />Coaching Skills<br />ICT Integration<br />http://schoolnet.org.za/PILP/<br />
    • 4. Chalk Talk Reflection<br />A silent reflection protocol that: <br />allows the group to reflect on learning; <br />generate ideas by writing instead of discussing them verbally. <br />
    • 5. Directions<br />Answer the question:<br />&quot;What are the essential elements of a learning activity?”<br />Write your responses to the question in silence. <br />You can add to other responses by: <br />Circling existing text (from someone else) that you find interesting or compelling. You may want to write a note that expands on why you find it interesting. <br />Connecting two ideas that seem related by drawing a line between them. If you think ideas might be related, but you aren’t sure, link them with a line and then put a question mark on the line. <br />Circling some text you have a question about and then writing the question next to that idea <br />
    • 6. Debrief the protocol<br />What patterns appear in the responses? <br />How did this silent activity help bring out ideas differently than a conversation would have done? <br />How could you use this in your school? <br />How could you use this in a classroom? <br />How might you use this in an informal one-to-many coaching situation? <br />
    • 7. KwaZulu Natal- Durban<br />
    • 8. East London cluster<br />Teachers are from Cradock, Middelburg, Queenstown, King Williamstown, Cintsa and East London.<br />SESSION 2 - 5<br />SESSION 1<br />
    • 9. Scenes from the Group …<br />
    • 10. Clock Partners<br />
    • 11. Happiness… after lunch<br />
    • 12. Lesson Improvement<br />There are six major steps to the lesson improvement process: <br /><ul><li>Assessment Standards: Identify no more than three assessment standards.
    • 13. Develop a Task : Authentic and engaging
    • 14. Learner/Teacher Directions
    • 15. Use of ICT : Helps students with </li></ul> - Communication <br /> - Collaboration <br />- Gathering information  <br /><ul><li>Organizing information 
    • 16. Expression
    • 17. Design Assessments
    • 18. Identify resources</li></li></ul><li>Lesson Improvement <br />What does it mean to enhancelearning with ICT? <br />How can ICT be integrated into the curriculum to help achieve assessment standards? <br />What are the principles of sound lesson design? <br />
    • 19. Lesson Improvement Activity<br />Activity : Let us try to improve the lesson together<br />Open “What’s for lunch” Lesson.<br />Use the following resources to show how different ICTs can be used to enhance it.<br />Learning Activity Checklist<br />Lesson Improvement Process rubric<br />
    • 20. KwaZulu Natal<br />Insert Nomty’s photos here….<br />
    • 21. One key role professional development plays is to help teachers to evaluatelearning activitiesby comparingthem to their principles of effective learning<br />Grant Wiggins (2009)<br />
    • 22. Quinn’s Six Questions<br />Developed by Juli Quinn<br />What am I teaching and to whom?<br />Whyam I teaching it?<br />How am I teaching it?<br />Why am I teaching it that way?<br />What evidence do I collect to show my students are getting it?<br />How do my students know they are getting it?<br />
    • 23. Promising Practices Scavenger Hunt <br />Teachers carefully plan their curriculum to help students meet academic standards, but often struggle with the creation of authentic, engaging tasks that can make powerful and appropriate use of technology.<br />As a coach, you and the teachers you collaborate with must share a common answer to the question:<br />“What are the essential elements of a learning activity that will prepare students with the skills they need for their future?”<br />
    • 24. Working independently, review the questions on the sheet relating to the video clip you are about to see. You may want to check your responses as you watch. <br />
    • 25.
    • 26. Wagon Wheel Activity (30 minutes)<br />Purpose:<br />• To stimulate lots of generative thinking in a very short time.<br />• To stimulate powerful thinking between people who might not know each other.<br />• To create a “vivid image bank” of a new idea in action.<br />• To develop a sense of team with a common purpose.<br /> What we need to answer at the end of the activity:<br />How did technology contribute to student learning?<br />Refer to the video example, explain how the design of the lesson and use of technology contributed to the improvement of student learning. <br />Set up<br />Three chairs back to back at the hub of the wheel and three chairs on the outer circle facing the chairs at the hub.<br />
    • 27. Wagon Wheel Activity <br />Directions<br />Bring paper and pen and fill in the seats in the wheel(s).<br />Take notes of your own ideas as well as your partner’s.<br />The people on the outside of the wheel will be moving one seat to the right at each rotation; people at the hub remain in their seats.<br />You will be working on one topic with each partner for approximately 7 minutes — i.e. you will work with 3 different partners during the activity.<br />For each topic you have to reach a common understanding of what the topic means and then brainstorm what it would look like in action.<br />At the end of each rotation, each participant sitting on the outside of the wheel will rotate one seat to the right. <br /> The three topics<br />How can learners be engaged in substantive learning?<br />How can activities engage students in higher-order thinking skills?<br />How can technology enhance learning?<br /> Going Deeper<br />Pick your favourite ideas for each topic and write them down on post-its. Make sure you label the top of each post-it. Place your Post-it on the large flip chart sheets with the topic title on the top around the room.<br />
    • 28. A well-prepared coach can:<br />Help collaborating teachers improve their lessons using a common definition of effective lesson design. <br />Recommend content resources or suggest instructional strategies to improve learning activities. <br />Use communications skills that encourage the collaborating teacher to think more deeply about adopting new approaches that meet the needs of students to improve learning. <br />Assist other teachers to understand how technology can enrich and enhance learning.<br />
    • 29. Integrate ICT so that one or more of the following objectives is met:<br /><ul><li>Learners gain access to information or points of view they could not readily find elsewhere.
    • 30. Learners investigatea concept in ways they could not without the ICT (e.g., virtual dissection).
    • 31. Learners organizeinformation to facilitate comparison, analysis, or synthesis.
    • 32. Learners use the same problem-solving tools adults use.
    • 33. Instruction is differentiatedto meet the needs of different learners.
    • 34. Learners collaboratewith remote groups or subject-matter experts outside the classroom. </li></li></ul><li>Sometimes learners&apos; excitementabout learning a new technology significantly increasestheir engagementin a learning activity, but increased engagement is not enough: <br />ICT integration must add learning value<br />Technology needs to be like oxygen - ubiquitous, necessary, and invisible. <br />Chris Lehmann , Principal, SLA<br />
    • 35. Images from Bloemfontein Clusters<br />
    • 36. Thank You<br />Presented By:<br />Peer Coaches<br />Date:<br />06 July 2011<br />Contact:<br />011 403 5777<br />omashani@schoolnet.org.za<br />

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