Autism Training Solutions Webinar 2-29-2012

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Look through the presentation from the webinar held on February 29, 2012 with Emaley McCulloch from Autism Training Solutions about training educators to do behavior assessments with their FBA Toolkit.

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  • Performance indicators and satisfaction
  • Have 40 second video of 13 year old boy speaking out of turn in class that we can show here to practice creating behavioral definition
  • Have 40 second video of 13 year old boy speaking out of turn in class that we can show here to practice creating behavioral definition
  • Have 40 second video of 13 year old boy speaking out of turn in class that we can show here to practice creating behavioral definition
  • Have 40 second video of 13 year old boy speaking out of turn in class that we can show here to practice creating behavioral definition
  • Will hand out Functional Interview Form for them to use
  • Have ABC forms that allow you to tailor the antecedents/consequences from the interview form. ABC form should use multiple choice so you don ’t have to write down each condition. This is helpful when you are taking data and running a lesson. Hand out ABC recording forms for them to use in virtual FBA and for teachers to use
  • Virtual Observation 3 min. video. Audience will practice taking ABC data here.
  • Will pass out Functional Assessment form for teacher use.
  • Have audience provide answers here and give feedback on practice sessions.
  • Identify that an FBA needs to be done Make an observable and measurable definition of the problem behavior Gather information on the behavior Prioritize what behavior needs attention first Collect data on the antecedents and consequences of the problem behavior in several environments Make a functional hypothesis of what the function(s) is/are, the triggers and what is supporting the behavior. Last BUT NOT LEAST, create a plan that utilizes proactive procedures, teaches replacement behavior and outlines how everyone will respond to the behavior.
  • Autism Training Solutions Webinar 2-29-2012

    1. 1. This webinar took place on Feb. 29, 2012.View the recording at: http://www.schoolimprovement.com/pd360-free-pd/webinars/ Training Educators to Do Behavior Assessments Emaley McCulloch Autism Training Solutions © 2012 School Improvement Network
    2. 2. February 29, 2012CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    3. 3. Autism Training Solutions- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -Who - - are:- - -- - we -Autism Training Solutions is the online education company dedicated to training professionals withinthe field of autism and other behavioral disorders.We are dedicated to:. . . creating an evidence-based intervention video training solution to ensure professionals areequipped with the knowledge to improve and enhance the lives of people with autism and otherrelated disorders.We s trong ly believe that :…. success starts in the hands of the mentor, teacher, therapist, tutor and parent. Professionals whowork with children with special needs have the hardest jobs and hearts of gold - they deserve moretools in their tool belts. ATS provides just that!“Children with autism are not learning disabled, they are teaching challenged.”-Vincent Carbone CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    4. 4. What’s the function?- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -
    5. 5. Functional Behavior Assessment & Positive Behavior Support - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Behavior Assessments is an established systematic process for • -Functional - - assessing the relationship of a behavior and the context in which it occurs (Blair, Umbreit, & Bos; 1999; Carr et al., 1999; Lee, Sugai, & Horner, 1999) • The primary goal of an FBA is to guide the development of effective positive interventions based on the functions of behavior (e.g. escape, attention, access to items, access to self-stimulation) (Horner, 1994) • Thus, an FBA is “critical to the design and successful implementation of positive behavior interventions”(Watson & Steege, 2003). • A summary of this information will help an individual student team develop effective behavioral supports that: -prevent problem behaviors from occurring -teach alternative behaviors -& effectively respond when problem behaviors occur. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    6. 6. Functions that behaviors serve Problem Behavior Escape/ Obtain/Get Avoid Something Something Stimulation/ Tangible/ Social Sensory Activity Adult Peer 6
    7. 7. School Wide Positive Behavior Support Model of Prevention - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Functional Analysis is complex, time consuming focused on a more intensive behavior problems. Behavior Specialist needed. FBA involves simple and realistic team-driven assessment and intervention strategies. Trained school-based personnel can do it. Predict common problems and develop interventions at a school level CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    8. 8. Practical FBA vs. Comprehensive FBA Practical FBA (Tier 2) Comprehensive FBA (Tier 3) For: Students with mild to Students with moderate to moderate problem behaviors severe behavioral problems; (behaviors that are NOT may be dangerous and/or dangerous or occurring in occurring in many settings many settings) What: Relatively simple and Time-intensive process that also efficient process to guide involves archival records review, behavior support planning family-centered planning, and collaboration with agencies outside of school Who School-based personnel (e.g., Professionals trained to conduct functional assessments with students teachers, counselors, with severe problem behaviors (e.g., administrators) school psychologists, behavior specialists) Loman & Borgmeier (2010)CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    9. 9. Competencies to doing a Practical FBA- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- •- Identify-that-an FBA needs to be done - - - - • Make an observable and measurable definition of the problem behavior • Gather information on the behavior • Prioritize what behavior needs attention first • Collect data on the antecedents and consequences of the problem behavior in several environments • Make a functional hypothesis of what the function(s) is/are, the triggers and what is supporting the behavior. • Last BUT NOT LEAST, create a plan that utilizes proactive procedures, teaches replacement behavior and outlines how everyone will respond to the behavior. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    10. 10. Practical FBA in-service curriculum• Loman, S. & Borgmeir, C. (2009). Practical FBA: Practical Functional Behavior Assessment Training Manual for School- Based Personnel. Portland State University Retrieved October 15, 2011 from http://www.pbis.org/common/pbisresources/publi
    11. 11. How to Scale Down FBAs for School Staff- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Use everyday language • Break down the FBA process into simple steps • Provide all of the materials for them to use (which we will give to you today) • Have them practice data virtually with video (which we will give to you today) • Have them apply what they have learned one step at a time. Scott, Alter & McQuillian, (2010) CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    12. 12. How to “Scale Down” the FBA in a D.A.S.H.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - Define Ask about See the Hypothesize Behavior the Behavior Behavior D A S H Loman & Borgmeier (2010) CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    13. 13. Step One: Define Behavior- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - Define Ask about See the Hypothesize Behavior the Behavior Behavior • Definitions of behavior need to be: • Observable: the behavior is an action that can be seen • Measureable: the behavior can be counted or timed • Define the behavior so that an unfamiliar person could recognize what the behavior looks like CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    14. 14. What are the observable behaviors?- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Speaking out of turn • Chewing his pencil • Getting mad • Getting out of seat • Not holding still • Lack of social skills • Being fidgety • Being disruptive • Hyperactive CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    15. 15. What are the observable behaviors?- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Speaking out of turn • Chewing his pencil • Getting mad • Getting out of seat • Not holding still • Lack of social skills • Being fidgety • Being disruptive • Hyperactive CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    16. 16. Define the Behavior- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Cleaning • Speaking out of turn • Tantrum CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    17. 17. Define the Behavior- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Cleaning- moving a broom back and forth on the floor, wiping surfaces, and putting items away • Speaking out of turn- speaking without being called during times he is required to raise his hand • Tantrum- crying, screaming, physically resisting prompts CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    18. 18. Step 2: Ask about the Behavior- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Using the Functional Interview form adapted from Durand and Crimmins (1988) assists one in identifying the behaviors that are of higher priority. • Conducting an interview can also help you plan and maximize your observation times. • Using the Motivation Assessment gives the team some ideas that contribute to the functional hypothesis. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    19. 19. Step 3: See the Behavior- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - Use an ABC recording form that is simple to use. Antecedent Behavior Consequence  Denied access to item or activity   Physical discomfort relieved    Verbal redirection  Demand situation    Interruption/blocking response  No materials or activities   Nothing/ignored    Interruption/ transition activity    Social attention  Highly stimulating environment  Physically guided to comply  Wants something (can have)  Task was removed  Denied access to item/activity  Attention given to others  Time out (duration: _______)  Seemed uncomfortable or sick  Access to preferred item/activity  Other ___________________  Other ___________________ CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    20. 20. Step 3: Practice ABC data with video- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    21. 21. Step 4: Hypothesize- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    22. 22. Step 4: Hypothesize- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -   Functional Assessment (FBA) Summary Person of Concern: Age: Sex: Male / Female Date of Interview: Evaluator: _______________________ G.Behavior(s) being evaluated: ______________________________________________________________________ B. Review the information from the Functional Interview(s) and the observation to complete the areas below: 1. Behavior Definition: _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 2. Identified Environmental conditions /mo’s (e.g. sleep deprivation, medical conditions etc.) _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 3. Antecedents (demand, termination, no attention, not engaged etc.) _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    23. 23. Step 4: Hypothesize- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • What are the Antecedents? • What are the Consequences? • What are some modifications that can be put in to prevent the behavior from happening? • What are some replacement behaviors that can be taught? • What can be done in response to the behavior so that the behavior is less likely to happen in the future? CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    24. 24. Put Results into Behavior Plan- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -Behavior Prevention Replacemen Response to Reinforce other Measure- Strategies t Problem or absence of ment Behavior Behavior behavior StrategiesTalking out Pro-active Raising his Cost Response Reward Joseph Tallyof turn- access to hand when he hasspeaking social Loss of points days with lowwithout interaction- Allow him towards iPad levels of talkingbeing called give Joseph share time out of turn withon during opportunities appropriate more iPad timetimes he is to share stories orrequired to when he commentsraise his raises hishand hand CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    25. 25. Application in the Classroom- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • Have teachers/ staff apply steps of FBA with actual student within a week of online video training and report results to you for feedback. • Ability to take data and create a functional hypothesis is only half way to completing a Behavior Plan. Determining appropriate antecedent and consequence interventions appropriate to the behavior’s function is another skill entirely. Additional training on evidence-based interventions is needed. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    26. 26. Provide Continued Training with Online Videos- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -• Takes evidenced-based interventions and breaks them down into step-by- step video modules• Uses everyday language, real examples and real teachers in the classroom• Empowers teachers to make treatment decisions when behavior specialists are not available• Provides resources (data forms, self checklists, and lesson plans) to help implement interventions learned in training• Needs-based (only learn information that is pertinent to your student’s needs)• Self-paced (do this at your own time and pace) CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    27. 27. Premium Course Through PD-360- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -Positive Behavior Supports for Special Behavioral Strategies for Students - - - - - - Education (Tier 2 and 3 Students) with Autism · What is the foundational science of · All the topics covered in PBIS positive behavior support? series · How to use principles of behavior to · What are the characteristics of decrease and prevent problem autism and related disabilities? behaviors? · How to teach new behaviors that · How do students with autism replace problem behaviors? learn? · What are the steps to doing a behavior assessment? · How to develop a positive behavior support plan? CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    28. 28. Research:- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - Does training translate into the classroom? CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    29. 29. Impact of Online Videos on Paraprofessionals- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -PURPOSE: - - - - - - The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an online training technology on the implementation of mand training on three paraprofessionals. METHOD: A multiple baseline design across participants was used. The study was conducted in a special education classroom in a rural part of Hawaii. Three female paraprofessionals with limited higher education, ages 26, 34, and 46 all of Hawaiian ancestry. One girl and two boys ages 6,8,10 also participated. All paraprofessionals had no previous training in autism interventions. All three students had developmental disabilities and language delays and goals in their IEPs to increase functional communication. PROCEDURE: Data was collected before and after training on the teachers ability to implement mand training procedures the children spontaneous mands. Teachers watched online training and used self-checklist during implementation. Inter-observer reliability was done 35% of the time and was 84% for teacher and student. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    30. 30. Independent Variable- Online Training Videos- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -During-training, paraprofessionals logged• - - - - - into Autism Training Solution’s Learning Management System.• The system required a pretest• Series of video modules• A competency quiz is given after each module.• After passing competency quizzes, a post-test was required to complete the training.• They were then prompted to download a self checklist to use during intervention.• Total training = 2hours CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    31. 31. Results- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - • During baseline the three paraprofessionals showed low performance (mean was 15% in baseline) and after training all three paraprofessionals showed improvement in implementing mand training procedures (mean in post training was 62%). • The students also showed improvement in using mands to communicate. The mean scores were 22% baseline and 52% post-training. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    32. 32. Rebecca and Maili- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    33. 33. Autumn and Ezra- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    34. 34. Molly and Adam- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    35. 35. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    36. 36. Steps to Training Your Teachers in Practical- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -FBA- -FBA-Competencies - - - - - Handout  Identify that an FBA needs to be done • FBA overview  Make an observable and measurable • Video exercise definition of the problem behavior  Gather information on the behavior • Functional Interview Form  Prioritize what behavior needs attention first • Motivation Assessment  Collect data on the antecedents and • ABC Recording Form consequences of the problem behavior in several environments  Make a functional hypothesis of what the • Functional Assessment Summary Form function(s) is/are, the triggers and what is supporting the behavior.  Create a plan that utilizes proactive • Behavior Intervention Plan Template procedures, teaches replacement behavior and outlines how everyone will respond to the behavior. CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    37. 37. References- Cooper,-J.O., - - - T.E.-& Heward, W.L. (2007). -Applied - - - -Analysis:-Second Edition. - - - - - Heron, - - - - - - - - - - Behavior - - - - - - -- Pearson, Columbus,-OH. - - - - - - Loman, S. & Borgmeir, C. (2009). Practical FBA: Practical Functional Behavior Assessment Training Manual for School-Based Personnel. Portland State University Retrieved October 15, 2011 from http://www.pbis.org/common/pbisresources/publications/PracticalFBA_TrainingManual.pdf O’Neill, R.E., Horner, R.H., Albion, R.W., Storey, K., & Sprague, J. (1996). Functional assessment and program development for problem behavior: A practical handbook. Scott, T.M., Alter, P.J., McQuillan K. (2010) Functional behavior assessment in the classroom settings: scaling down to scale up. Intervention in School and Clinic 46:87-94. Sugai, G., Horner, R. H., Dunlap, G. Hieneman, M., Lewis, T. J., Nelson, C. M., Scott, T., Liaupsin, C., Sailor, W., Turnbull, A. P., Turnbull, H. R., III, Wickham, D., Wilcox, B., & Ruef, M. (2000). Applying positive behavioral support and functional behavioral assessment in schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2, 131-143. Wadsworth Publishing Company. Witt, J.C., Daly, E.M., & Noell, G.H. (2000). Functional assessments: A step-by-step guide. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.  CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    38. 38. Thank you!- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -more information about online training, visit For - - www.AutismTrainingSolutions.com School Improvement Network www.SchoolImprovement.com CONF NT LA PROPR T R IDE IA ND IE A Y
    39. 39. V is it U s O n lin e Call us: 1-800-572-1153 Visit us on the web: www.schoolimprovement.com Visit http://www.schoolimprovement.com/pd360-free-pd/webinars/ to see past recordings and register for future webinars. YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/SchoolImprovementNet Blog: http://schoolimprovementnetwork.blogspot.com Facebook http://www.facebook.com/SchoolImprovementNetwork Twitter: @sinetpd360 LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/school-improvement-network Click here to request more information about PD 360, the ATS premium courses, or one of our other innovative products.© 2012 School Improvement Network

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