Connectivity and Community:Reconsidering the Digital Divide         Hovig Tchalian, Lecturer Viterbi School, Engineering W...
TOYOTA COMMERCIALhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUGmcb3mhLM
Findings from a Pew Research Center study (June 2011)Users of social networking sites…•Have more “close ties” than the ave...
ALL CELL PHONE USERS   100%                                o                                                              ...
YOUNG ADULTS (18-29)                                                             ed                                       ...
YOUNG ADULTS (18-29)                                                             ed                                       ...
Findings published in New Media and Society (Nov. 2011)•“Social media users knew people from a greater variety of backgrou...
Findings from a Pew Research Center study (June 2011)Conclusion:“There is little evidence that social media is responsible...
not in Toyota commercialStrengtheningexisting relationships
Glaring Irony: site (complete with cricket sounds) leads kids… back to the forest
YOUNG ADULTS (18-29)                                                             ed                                       ...
YOUNG ADULTS (18-29)                                                             ed                                       ...
The Bottom Half…
The Top Half…
Results: You are an Ambivalent Networker (Me)If you are an Ambivalent Networker, you have folded mobile devicesinto how yo...
Results: You are a Digital Collaborator (Students?)If you are a Digital Collaborator, you use information technology towor...
Findings from a Cambridge University study (July 2011)•1 in 3 people felt “overwhelmed” by new communication technology•65...
Applications1. Norms and “noise”3. Blended activities5. Connectivity and community
Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
NORMSNOISE
Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
In Short…
connectivitycommunity
APPENDIX
http://news.bookweb.org/graphics/articles/200903/adoption.jpg
DISCOVER THE FOREST ads: billboards and online
A recent follow-up study, “Social Networking Sites and Our Lives” (Pew ResearchCenter), found that the average user of a s...
•Cell phones are useful for quick information retrieval (so much so that their absence can cause problems)– Half of all ad...
New communications technology makes one in three people feel ‘overwhelmed’, according to anew study from Cambridge Univers...
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian
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Reconsidering the Digital Divide, by Hovig Tchalian

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  1. 1. Connectivity and Community:Reconsidering the Digital Divide Hovig Tchalian, Lecturer Viterbi School, Engineering Writing Program
  2. 2. TOYOTA COMMERCIALhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUGmcb3mhLM
  3. 3. Findings from a Pew Research Center study (June 2011)Users of social networking sites…•Have more “close ties” than the average American•Are “half as likely” to be socially isolated as the average American•Receive more social support than those not using the siteshttp://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/02/12/the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-living-alone/social-media-as-community
  4. 4. ALL CELL PHONE USERS 100% o ak nf m re do ei ab iat re bo ed t g 75% ge t in m f of to ac im er ve ff, t in t Ge st a o ne id lp ho vo He 50% dp oa ne et r on Tu ph ed 51% Us 25% 42% 29% 13% 0%http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  5. 5. YOUNG ADULTS (18-29) ed or nb he t, w en nm tai o er 100% inf nt ve re rie fo ak ng et ed re r ti ab Us kly ac er ic t 75% ge Qu int to id vo ff, o oa ne et ho on 50% dp ph ne ed r Tu Us 64% 70% 25% 32% 30% 0%http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  6. 6. YOUNG ADULTS (18-29) ed or nb he t, w en nm tai o er 100% inf nt ve re rie fo ak ng et ed re r ti ab Us kly ac er ic t 75% ge Qu int to id vo ff, o oa ne et ho on 50% dp ph ne Toyota ed r Tu Us 64% 70% commercial 25% 32% 30% 0% vs. 13%http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  7. 7. Findings published in New Media and Society (Nov. 2011)•“Social media users knew people from a greater variety of backgrounds”•“Much of this diversity was a result of people using these technologies whosimultaneously spent an impressive amount of time socializing outside of the house” substitute for socializing complement to socializinghttp://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/02/12/the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-living-alone/social-media-as-community
  8. 8. Findings from a Pew Research Center study (June 2011)Conclusion:“There is little evidence that social media is responsible for a trend of isolation, or a lossof intimacy and social support.”http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/02/12/the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-living-alone/social-media-as-community
  9. 9. not in Toyota commercialStrengtheningexisting relationships
  10. 10. Glaring Irony: site (complete with cricket sounds) leads kids… back to the forest
  11. 11. YOUNG ADULTS (18-29) ed or nb he t, w en nm tai o er 100% inf nt ve re rie fo ak ng et ed re r ti ab Us kly ac er ic t 75% ge Qu int to id vo ff, o oa ne et ho on 50% dp ph ne ed r Tu Us 64% 70% 25% 32% 30% 0% vs. More “fidgety” 42%http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  12. 12. YOUNG ADULTS (18-29) ed or nb he t, w en nm tai o er 100% inf nt ve re rie fo ak ng et ed re r ti ab Us kly ac er ic t 75% ge Qu int to id vo ff, o oa ne et ho on 50% dp ph ne ed r Tu Us 64% 70% 25% 32% 30% 0% vs. 29% But also less “plugged in”http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  13. 13. The Bottom Half…
  14. 14. The Top Half…
  15. 15. Results: You are an Ambivalent Networker (Me)If you are an Ambivalent Networker, you have folded mobile devicesinto how you run your social life, whether through texting or onlinesocial networking tools. You also rely on ICTs* for entertainment.At the same time – perhaps because of the volume of digital pingsfrom others – you may sometimes find all your connectivity to beintrusive. You are confident in your ability to troubleshoot yourvarious information devices and services.*Information and Communication Technologies
  16. 16. Results: You are a Digital Collaborator (Students?)If you are a Digital Collaborator, you use information technology towork with and share your creations with others. You areenthusiastic about how ICTs help you connect with others andconfident in your ability to manage digital devices and information.For you, the digital commons can be a camp, a lab, or a theatergroup – places to gather with others to develop something new.
  17. 17. Findings from a Cambridge University study (July 2011)•1 in 3 people felt “overwhelmed” by new communication technology•65% of adults and 64% of children prefer communicating “in person”•People are happier when they feel they can control new technologyhttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/8615989/One-in-three-overwhelmed-by-technology.html
  18. 18. Applications1. Norms and “noise”3. Blended activities5. Connectivity and community
  19. 19. Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
  20. 20. NORMSNOISE
  21. 21. Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
  22. 22. Applications• Norms and “noise”• Blended activities• Connectivity and community
  23. 23. In Short…
  24. 24. connectivitycommunity
  25. 25. APPENDIX
  26. 26. http://news.bookweb.org/graphics/articles/200903/adoption.jpg
  27. 27. DISCOVER THE FOREST ads: billboards and online
  28. 28. A recent follow-up study, “Social Networking Sites and Our Lives” (Pew ResearchCenter), found that the average user of a social networking site had more close tiesthan and was half as likely to be socially isolated as the average American. Additionally,my co-authors and I, in another article published in New Media & Society, found notonly that social media users knew people from a greater variety of backgrounds, butalso that much of this diversity was a result of people using these technologies whosimultaneously spent an impressive amount of time socializing outside of the house.A number of studies, including my own and those of Matthew Brashears (a sociologistat Cornell), have found that Americans have fewer intimate relationships today than 20years ago. However, a loss of close friends does not mean a loss of support. Because ofcellphones and social media, those we depend on are more accessible today than at anypoint since we lived in small, village-like settlements.Social media has made every relationship persistent and pervasive. We no longer losesocial ties over our lives; we have Facebook friends forever. The constant feed of statusupdates and digital photos from our online social circles is the modern front porch. Thisis why, in “Social Networking Sites and Our Lives,” there was a clear trend for those whoused these technologies to receive more social support than other people.The data backs it up. There is little evidence that social media is responsible for a trendof isolation, or a loss of intimacy and social support.http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/02/12/the-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-living-alone/social-media-as-community
  29. 29. •Cell phones are useful for quick information retrieval (so much so that their absence can cause problems)– Half of all adult cell owners (51%) had used their phone at least once to get information they needed rightaway. One quarter (27%) said that they experienced a situation in the previous month in which they hadtrouble doing something because they did not have their phone at hand.•Cell phones are an important tool in emergency situations – 40% of cell owners said they foundthemselves in an emergency situation in which having their phone with them helped.•Cell phones can help stave off boredom – 42% of cell owners used their phone for entertainment whenthey were bored.•Despite their advantages, some cell phone owners just need an occasional break – 29% of cell ownersturned their phone off for a period of time just to get a break from using it.•With advantages comes frustration – 20% of cell owners experienced frustration because their phone wastaking too long to download something; 16% had difficulty reading something on their phone because thescreen was too small; and 10% had difficulty entering a lot of text on their phone.•Cell phones can help prevent unwanted personal interactions – 13% of cell owners pretended to be usingtheir phone in order to avoid interacting with the people around them.Young adults (those between the ages of 18 and 29) are especially likely to say that they have encounteredseveral of these situations recently:•70% of 18-29 year old cell owners have used their phone for entertainment when they were bored•64% have used their phone to quickly retrieve information they needed•42% have had trouble doing something because they did not have their phone nearby•30% have used their phone to avoid interacting with the people around themhttp://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Cell-Phones/Key-Findings.aspx
  30. 30. New communications technology makes one in three people feel ‘overwhelmed’, according to anew study from Cambridge University.The eight-month research project, which also examined other countries, found that whileBritons overwhelmingly viewed new technology such as mobile phones and social networks as apositive thing, 38 per cent of 10-14 year olds felt that too much of it could be upsetting; 34 percent of 25-34 reported feeling similarly.Young people, however, did not say that they favoured digital communication over face-to-face.While 65 per cent of adults said they preferred communicating in person, the same was alsotrue for 64 per cent of children.Those people who felt overwhelmed by new technology were also more likely to feel unsatisfiedin other areas of their lives. Individuals who retained control over new technology generally felthappier.Professor John Clarkson, director of the Engineering Design Centre at the University ofCambridge and Principal Investigator of the study, said families who had a better understandingof their use of communications technology appeared to have a more balanced and positiverelationship with it. “There is much discussion about whether communications technology isaffecting us for the better or worse. The research has shown that communications technology isseen by most as a positive tool but there are examples where people are not managing usage aswell as they could be.” He added, “it is not necessarily the amount but the way in which it isused.”http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/8615989/One-in-three-overwhelmed-by-technology.html

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