Fundamentals of Managing the Data Center Life Cycle for Owners
 

Fundamentals of Managing the Data Center Life Cycle for Owners

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Just as good genes do not guarantee health and well-being, a good design alone does not ensure a data center is well-built and will remain efficient and available over the course of its life span. For ...

Just as good genes do not guarantee health and well-being, a good design alone does not ensure a data center is well-built and will remain efficient and available over the course of its life span. For each phase of the data center’s life cycle, proper care and action must be taken to continuously meet the business needs of the facility. This presentation describes the five phases of the data center life cycle, identifies key tasks and pitfalls, and offers practical advice to facility owners and management.

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Fundamentals of Managing the Data Center Life Cycle for Owners Fundamentals of Managing the Data Center Life Cycle for Owners Presentation Transcript

  • Fundamentals of Managing the Data Center Life Cycle for Owners Schneider Electric Data Center Science Center White Paper 195 Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Just as good genes do not guarantee health and well-being, a good design alone does not ensure a data center is well-built and will remain efficient and available over the course of its life span. For each phase of the data center’s life cycle, proper care and action must be taken to continuously meet the business needs of the facility. This presentation describes the five phases of the data center life cycle, identifies key tasks and pitfalls, and offers practical advice to facility owners and management. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Introduction – Understanding the Big Picture The Five Phases of the Data Center Life Cycle Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Plan Phase Determines key project parameters of the physical system to be created, i.e., system concept, site selection, and project process ● Ideal project process ● Often referred to as “programming” ● System concept ● Players at this stage ● Facilities and IT departments ● Executives ● CFO ● Real estate group within the company NOTE: In this paper, only system planning is covered. System planning refers to the power, cooling, racks, and other support infrastructure systems. Planning related to the IT equipment is not discussed here. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Plan Phase Ideal project process ● Conduct project efficiently, reliably, and understandably ● Have safeguards to eliminate missed handoffs, ambiguous responsibility, and lost information ● Detail key stakeholders, responsibilities ● Include strategies to manage unplanned occurrences, i.e., project changes and defects ● Be modular and configurable, adaptable to projects of different types and sizes White Paper 140, “Data Center Projects: Standardized Process”, offers a detailed definition and description of a formal, standardized, and documented process. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Plan Phase System concept ● A high level description of the system ● Includes validated user preferences and constraints, standards, codes, resource assignments, deadlines, and process requirements for project ● These design requirements become input for design phase See white paper 142, “Data Center Projects; System Planning”, for more information. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Establish PROJECT PARAMETERS 1 Develop SYSTEM CONCEPT Make the six foundational decisions that will control the system architecture and budget 2 Choose a model design for the system, based on the six PROJECT PARAMETERS Plan Phase System System concept Planning Sequence Incorporate USER PREFERENCES AND CONSTRAINTS Identify, validate, and adapt user-specific Determine IMPLEMENTATION REQUIREMENTS Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 3 4 details that will refine the SYSTEM CONCEPT Collect standards, codes, deadlines, resource assignments, and process requirements the project must conform to • Criticality • Capacity • Growth plan • Efficiency • Density • Budget •Reference design •Room choice •Concept Adaptations •Validated Preferences •Validated Constraints Implementation requirements The combined outputs are the design requirements for input to the DESIGN phase
  • Plan Phase System concept Avoid Problems in Project Process ● Right information > right decision Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 maker > right sequence ● Focus on shared understanding and consensus: criticality, capacity, growth plan, efficiency, density, and budget ● Avoid detailed design work until design requirements are validated and agreed upon
  • Plan Phase System concept Reference Designs ● Validated, documented high-level plan for physical infrastructure ● Especially important in the absence of design engineers in early planning phase See white paper 147, “Advantages of Using a Reference Design” for more information. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Plan Phase Site selection ● Site must meet design requirements ● Site evaluation must consider availability risks and financial benefits ● Key considerations ● Energy costs ● Tax preferences/incentives ● Labor costs See white paper 81, “Site Selection for Mission Critical Facilities”, for more information. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Design Phase Involves detailed design work required to translate Plan phase outputs into site-specific schematics and buildable construction documents, i.e., drawings and specifications ● Approved documents used for permitting by governmental authorities-having-jurisdiction Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 - AHJs ● Construction contractors evaluated, selected ● Well-managed design/build model takes about 4-6 weeks ● Well-managed design/bid/build model takes about 8-10 weeks
  • Design Phase Typical high-level overview Owner’s Design Requirements from Plan Phase (see Figure 2) Architect & CE Firm OR Design/Build Firm Key Tasks: Project management, meet budget, feasibility studies, preliminary design, detailed design & specification, quotation, hire/bid general Owner evaluates, hires, and enters into contract with… contractor and/or sub-contractors for build & commissioning phases Detailed design outputs (approved by owner): •Schematic design (10% complete) •Design development (50% complete) •Construction documents (100% complete) General Contractor Likely parties involved in detailed design: Owner/Owner’s Rep Architect MEP engineers Structural, civil engineers IT consultants Energy/LEED consultants Commissioning agent Facility Operators Electrical Contractor Mechanical Contractor Low Voltage Contractor Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 Cycles of design iteration typically take place as requirements, preferences, and constraints change. If construction delivery model is “design/bid/build”, bidding by contractorsoften takes place at each of the design documentation levels (10%, 50%, 100% are common) …hired by architect or design/build firm Networking Contractor
  • Design Phase Construction delivery models Design/bid/build Traditional approach. Contractors bid during design development. Lowest priced responsible bidder meeting requirements is selected Construction begins. PROs: ● Possibly lower cost if design change orders are well-controlled ● Typically presented with more choices from more vendors for a given design Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 CONs: ● Bid process can add months to project schedule
  • Design Phase Construction delivery models Design/build Owner or architect hires team responsible for both design and construction. Selection based on merits and price. Price is guaranteed. Change orders typically not allowed by contractor. PROs: ● Shortens schedule by months. Eliminates time needed for bidding process. Construction starts in parallel with design documentation development ● Owner more likely to get exactly what is specified ● Enables early contractor involvement in design, possibly reducing risk and number of design iterations ● Fosters close cooperation between designers and contractors Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 CONs: ● Likely not the lowest cost
  • Design Phase Owner’s contract ● Important tool for ensuring right people > right time > right focus ● Defines key stakeholders roles, responsibilities by phase ● Defines compensation and insurance requirements ● Describes ● Cost of work ● Change resolution methods ● Change order process, limitations ● Termination grounds and processes Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Build Phase Information gathered and approved during Plan and Design phases is used as a basis for Build phase. ● Construction documents used ● To bid for contractors ● To secure building permits ● As basis for what is actually built at the chosen site ● Construction begins according to project plan ● Perform regular audits, quality assurance ● Weekly progress meetings ● Opportunity to train owner and facility operations team Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Build Phase Complete when ● Quality assurance confirms work is complete to project requirements ● Final certification of completion is issued to owner by construction team lead ● Passing score on commissioning test, if part of project ● Owner issues letter of formal acceptance of project Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Build Phase Commissioning ● Defined as a reliability science that documents and validates the result of a data center’s design and build processes ● Addresses Data Center complexity by testing and documenting overall system’s response to real world inputs and changes ● Ensures design and implementation in construction phase are sound ● Commissioning agents develop commissioning plan and schedule ● Work with design and construction teams Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Build Phase Commissioning Output Documents ● “As built” script report Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 ● Provides line-by-line report on what passed/failed ● Component error log report ● Describes what failed and what was impacted ● Trending report ● Executive summary of performance trends
  • Operate Phase Time during which physical infrastructure does what it was intended to do: house, power, cool, and secure IT servers, storage, and networking gear. ● A properly designed, implemented, and supported O&M program will ● minimize risk ● reduce costs ● provide competitive advantage for the overall business the data center serves Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Operate Phase Mission Critical Mindset ● Focuses on risk mitigation ● Grasps interconnectedness of facility and IT systems ● Analytical, process-driven approach to risk avoidance and problem solving ● Commitment to continuous learning and process improvement Owners & management must imbue the Ops team with this philosophy and mindset Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Operate Phase 12 Essential Elements of Data Center O&M Program ● Environmental health and safety ● Personnel management ● Emergency preparedness and response ● Maintenance management ● Training ● Change management ● Documentation management See white paper 196, “Essential Elements of Data Center Facility Operations”, for more information. Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 ● Infrastructure management ● Quality management ● Energy management ● Financial management ● Performance monitoring and review
  • Operate Phase Facilities-IT cooperation ● Cooperation will Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014 ● Make capacity planning more accurate and day-to-day operations more efficient ● Minimize impact to SLAs and the business when problems occur ● Reduce disruption caused by facility or IT equipment moves, adds, changes It is the responsibility of owners and management to foster this cooperation!
  • Assess Phase Concurrent with Operate phase, gives visibility to how operators and physical infrastructure systems are performing on an on-going basis. ● Yields useful, actionable information including… ● Degree to which the design intent and facility objectives are being met by current infrastructure in operation ● Energy efficiency of physical infrastructure in supporting IT ● General health and current risk profile of physical infrastructure ● Current power, cooling, and space capacities and use trends ● Effectiveness and experience levels of personnel ● Facility operations & maintenance program maturity and effectiveness Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Outsourcing Services Advantages ● Benefit from experience and expertise of others ● Frees up internal resources to focus on other key tasks and responsibilities ● Avoids learning curve and mistakes resulting from first time tasks ● Provides alternative to internal resources that lack bandwidth/resources required to learn new skills or perform certain functions Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Conclusion ●Provided owners, management teams with basic understanding of mission critical facility projects and operations in the context of a Data Center Life Cycle ●Described phases, their interconnection, principal players, key areas of focus Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014
  • Resources Data Center Projects: Standardized Process White Paper 140 Data Center Projects: System Planning White Paper 142 Data Center Projects: Advantages of Using a Data Center Reference Design White Paper 147 The Top 9 Mistakes in Data Center Planning White Paper 145 Site Selection For Mission Critical Facilities White Paper 81 Data Center Projects: Commissioning White Paper 148 Ten Errors to Avoid When Commissioning a Data Center White Paper 149 Essential Elements of Data Center Facility Operations White Paper 196 Avoiding Common Pitfalls of Evaluating and Implementing DCIM Solutions White Paper 170 Browse all APC white papers whitepapers.apc.com Browse all APC TradeOff Tools™ tools.apc.com Schneider Electric – Data Center Science Center WP 195 Presentation – February 2014