Preparing for Distributed EnergyResourcesAt the core: real-time network modeling with an Advanced DistributionManagement S...
SummaryExecutive Summary . ................................................................................... p	 1Introdu...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesExecutive summaryMore and more, as utilities face decreasing margin between syst...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesIntroductionThe deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) is growing as ...
Preparing for DistributedEnergy Resources
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesThe state of the Smart GridUp to now                                            ...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesWhat’s needed to move Smart Gridimplementations ahead?Many utilities are experie...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesDistributed energy resources arebecoming a ‘new normal’Regulatory driverWhile so...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesLoad transfer with distributedgenerationFigure 3 illustrates, very simply, the e...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesGetting ready with softwareThe next logical question: how do utilities manageloa...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesADMS optimizes DER management;grid operations and planningADMS is the large-scal...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesNetwork operation optimization – includingVolt/VAR Control to manage load tap ch...
Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesConclusionSecurity is of utmost importance when deploying ADMS in a mission-crit...
©2012 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.Schneider Electric USA, Inc.   4701 Royal Vista Circle   Fort Collins, CO 80...
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Preparing for Distributed Energy Resources

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More and more, as utilities face decreasing margin between system load and system capacity, they are in need of innovative smart grid solutions that can help them effectively disperse and store energy and manage load to meet resource requirements. Many are incorporating Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) to help fill the gap while, at the same time, meet requirements for reduced emissions and energy independence; these utilities will require the capability to accurately forecast and control DER contribution to the network, to assure security and grid reliability.
Advanced smart grid software designed to support DER management and optimize grid operations and planning works with a real-time network model, based on an accurate geodatabase and incorporating data from operational systems such as a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system and outage management system (OMS). Along with real-time visualization and monitoring of network status, this Advanced Distribution Management System – ADMS – provides a host of analytical tools that recommend the most optimal device operations, or optionally automate device operations, to maximize network efficiency and reliability. For example, the utility can apply Volt/VAR control to reduce feeder voltage automatically with no effect on the consumer. Detailed load profiling and load forecasting based on integrated weather feeds yield network load forecasting for effective renewables integration. Network simulation helps forecast medium-term and long-term load and supports effective development and planning.
ADMS functionality and tools are demonstrating that utilities can effectively manage demand without building large-scale generation.

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Transcript of "Preparing for Distributed Energy Resources"

  1. 1. Preparing for Distributed EnergyResourcesAt the core: real-time network modeling with an Advanced DistributionManagement System (ADMS)Make the most of your energy SM
  2. 2. SummaryExecutive Summary . ................................................................................... p 1Introduction ................................................................................................. p 2The state of the Smart Grid ......................................................................... p 4What’s needed to move Smart Grid implementations ahead?....................... p 5Distributed energy resources are becoming a ‘new normal’.......................... p 6Load transfer with distributed generation ..................................................... p 7Getting ready with software.......................................................................... p 8ADMS optimizes DER management; grid operations and planning . ............. p 9Conclusion................................................................................................... p 11
  3. 3. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesExecutive summaryMore and more, as utilities face decreasing margin between system load andsystem capacity, they are in need of innovative smart grid solutions that can helpthem effectively disperse and store energy and manage load to meet resourcerequirements. Many are incorporating Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) tohelp fill the gap while, at the same time, meet requirements for reduced emissionsand energy independence; these utilities will require the capability to accuratelyforecast and control DER contribution to the network, to assure security and gridreliability.Advanced smart grid software designed to support DER management andoptimize grid operations and planning works with a real-time network model,based on an accurate geodatabase and incorporating data from operationalsystems such as a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systemand outage management system (OMS). Along with real-time visualization andmonitoring of network status, this Advanced Distribution Management System– ADMS – provides a host of analytical tools that recommend the most optimaldevice operations, or optionally automate device operations, to maximize networkefficiency and reliability. For example, the utility can apply Volt/VAR control toreduce feeder voltage automatically with no effect on the consumer. Detailed loadprofiling and load forecasting based on integrated weather feeds yield networkload forecasting for effective renewables integration. Network simulation helpsforecast medium-term and long-term load and supports effective developmentand planning.ADMS functionality and tools are demonstrating that utilities can effectivelymanage demand without building large-scale generation. White paper | 01
  4. 4. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesIntroductionThe deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) is growing as isthe impact on electric utility distribution networks. While DERs are increasingrenewable energy with their multitude of benefits, there are many concernsutilities must tackle to assure successful management of a diverse anddistributed energy mix.Here, we discuss how DERs will contribute to achieving a smart electric grid andhow proper network planning, monitoring, analysis, and control, through ADMS,can transform distributed generation into an efficient asset. White paper | 02
  5. 5. Preparing for DistributedEnergy Resources
  6. 6. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesThe state of the Smart GridUp to now TerminologyEnergy policies are evolving worldwide, with differingregulations from country to country and within Here’s how we are using some commoncountries, helping drive Smart Grid investment industry terms –priorities. While the impetus to embark on advancedSmart Grid initiatives varies, and no two projects are Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) –the same, there are some common drivers: small-scale power generation technology that supplies less than 10 MW and is• Regulations promoting reduced carbon emissions, located throughout the distribution network. Increasingly, DERs consist of renewable energyrenewable technology and energy independence and energy storage – making DERs a popular component of Smart Grid implementations. - ifferent locations have more advanced D regulations than others Distributed Generation (DG) – referring to any dispersed generation less than 100 MW. In - ind and solar have become viable energy W this paper we are considering DG as a smaller- sources scale, subset of DER Electric Vehicles (EV) – serve as a source of - torage is enabling permanent and on-demand S significant load but can also serve as a form of load shifting virtual generation (storage)• timulus funding helping advance deployment of S Demand Response (DR) – management of advanced technology consumption, anywhere along a feeder, in response to supply conditions• onvergence of traditional generation capacity and C increasing system load Microgrid – a local network of DERs that is a subset of the distribution network. It can operate in an isolated manner or beNear term connected. Microgrid management targets local energy supply and demand.Regional factors are likely to predominate:• lectric vehicles (EVs) will begin to make an impact E • s volatile renewables – those such as solar and A on the distribution system. Their initial effect is wind that are intermittent sources – see increased not expected to be system-wide; instead, early deployment, Information Technology (IT) solutions adopters are likely to be localized within specific will be integral to their success and storage areas of a utility’s service territory, impacting the technology will have to advance. network at the distribution transformer level. See sidebar discussion for more about planning for the • olicy concerns – Customer privacy and cyber P deployment of EVs. security will continue to provide some challenge to Smart Grid implementation. White paper | 04
  7. 7. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesWhat’s needed to move Smart Gridimplementations ahead?Many utilities are experiencing a common trend:the margin between system load and system Electric vehiclescapacity is decreasing and is expected to continueto decrease. The utility can incorporate new power Utility thought leaders concur that penetration of EVs will initially be concentrated in‘sources’, purchased or generated; improve demand localized areas (early adopter neighborhoods)management; and add storage capability in order to – impacting secondary networks of themaintain a healthy margin between load and capacity. distribution system.Management of demand is the option least utilized,yet it poses significant potential because of the Nevertheless, penetration of EVs will requireseveral innovative ways it can be implemented. planning: • attery-charging scenarios vary: the higher BNeed to fill the gap the charging level, the faster the charge andThe Ontario Power Authority of Canada collected the greater the energy demand.data identifying the existing power sources that have • ermitting processes should be defined to Pbeen meeting its resource requirements over the past identify where EVs will reside.few years and its forecast of available generation inthe coming years; see Figure 1. This report forecasts • ate structures are needed to help control Rretirement of most existing nuclear facilities, a charging.decrease in reliance on existing oil and gas and coalsources and continuation of existing renewables. • eal-time monitoring can help model R demand accurately.What power sources, including ‘virtual sources’, are • etwork planning can preemptively address Nto be added to meet the increasing annual peak potential issues.forecasts? What is going to fill the gap? Many utilitieswill be required to disperse and store energy and • romotion by the utility can help encourage Pmanage load to meet resource requirements. desired charging habits. The utility armed with mitigation strategies will be best prepared to meet the demand and supply challenges, and the environmental and commercial benefits, of EVs.Figure 1. Expected change in how existing power sources contribute toward resourcerequirements (effective MW). Source: Ontario Power Authority White paper | 05
  8. 8. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesDistributed energy resources arebecoming a ‘new normal’Regulatory driverWhile some utility customers are installing renewablegeneration on their own initiative, the primary driveis coming from regulations that push for reducedemissions and energy independence. For example –The Canadian province of Ontario has implementedan aggressive feed-in tariff (FIT) that supportspenetration of DER (http://fit.powerauthority.on.ca/).California’s general strategy of cutting GHGemissions and creating green jobs includes these2020 targets: 33 percent of energy sourced fromrenewables; installation of one million solar rooftops;and stimulation of EV deployment and battery storageimplementation(http://www.energy.ca.gov/energypolicy/index.html)New business modelUtilities incorporating DER will have to plan fornew connections and ways to achieve accurateforecasting and the control needed for grid reliabilityand security.For these utilities, distributed energy resources willbecome a major factor in the new utility businessmodel; see Figure 2. At the heart of the new modelis the centralized intelligence system that integratesand manages devices, with intelligence moving outto provide more comprehensive management andcollect more data. Figure 2. Distributing energy resources is expected to be the new paradigm in utility management. Source: Progress Energy. White paper | 06
  9. 9. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesLoad transfer with distributedgenerationFigure 3 illustrates, very simply, the existence of DGin the event of a feeder trip. The DG, along with theneighboring feeder, might help back-feed the feederin question. Real-time data and accurate networkrepresentation are needed to facilitate the responsedecisions required for safe and reliable transfer ofload. The presence of DG will benefit from adaptiverelay protection to properly deal with the initial faultand manage increasing load following restoration. Figure 3. Managing load with distributed generation. White paper | 07
  10. 10. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesGetting ready with softwareThe next logical question: how do utilities manageload – to maintain the margin between load andsystem capacity – and plan for and leverage DER,to meet increasing demand?Operating the electric distribution networkwith a growing number of distributed energydevices (DERs) is simply not feasible withoutthe deployment of advanced software analytics– specifically, a real-time network model thatwill support operations management, networkoptimization and comprehensive planning. Thismodel resides at the centralized control centerillustrated in Figure 2 and is created and maintained Figure 4. Distribution network load is expected to continue to increase, in large part dueby advanced Smart Grid software. With this to population growth and the proliferation of consumer technology. A smart IT controlsoftware, utilities can integrate DER to defer capital system enables network management that will, in effect, increase system capacity andexpenditures for new generation sources; see maintain the margin between load and capacity without investment in new and costly traditional generation facilities.Figure 4. White paper | 08
  11. 11. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesADMS optimizes DER management;grid operations and planningADMS is the large-scale IT control system that canserve as the brain of the distribution network andsupport network operating decisions. It leverages theGIS as-built network model and integrates with manyoperational systems such as supervisory controland data acquisition (SCADA) systems and outagemanagement systems (OMS), to create a real-timenetwork model; see Figure 5.Utilities minimize losses and maximize reliability andsafety by applying ADMS functionality to manage thedistribution network throughout the service territory ina real-time manner. The ideal ADMS approach offersthree operating approaches to best meet reliabilityand efficiency goals: Figure 5. ADMS model provides network visualization via geographic, schematic and station one-line views.• rovide users with the solution’s advanced tools P and visual context • lanning analysis: online to evaluate ‘what if’ P scenarios and offline to assess historical activity and• rompt users with recommended switching P plan for future network enhancements operations • reparing for effective and secure deployment of P• ully automate network management with closed F DER, including storage and microgrids loop control functionality An ADMS solution can deliver a host of analyticalThe ADMS model delivers the information needed functions – some of which are identified below – thatacross the utility enterprise for: will optimize grid efficiency and enable effective and efficient integration of DERs.• onitoring, analysis and control of network M operations Network operation control – including Fault Location, Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR)• anaging load and adjusting the shape of the M with optional closed loop control (automated) demand curve switching, as well as large area restoration and load shedding to help sustain system stability during extreme peak periods. White paper | 9
  12. 12. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesNetwork operation optimization – includingVolt/VAR Control to manage load tap changers, Cutting-edge projects are puttingcapacitors, and voltage regulators with optional demand management to workclosed loop control in a self-healing manner. AnADMS also enables monitoring of renewable energy Automate peak load shaving. Using ADMSthrough detailed load profiling and, with integrated, Volt/VAR Control functionality, one utility is reducing feeder voltage automatically, withreal-time weather data, supports improved near-term no effect on the consumer, and deferring,and short-term load forecasting. It also supports or eliminating, the need to build large-scalethermal energy storage and evolving battery generation. The ADMS model is helping thetechnology. utility plan for ‘green’ MWs. According to a utility spokesperson, “We see this projectNetwork operation analysis – including energy as something that could change the power industry.”losses, both technical and commercial; relayprotection through settings and device coordination; Maximize Distributed Generation. This utilityreporting of harmonic distortion; and contingency serves a large, primarily rural territory andand security assessment to identify re-supply options looks to support feed-in tariff regulations andfollowing faults. distributed renewable energy. It is deploying ADMS modeling functionality to monitor theNetwork planning – including simulation that high growth of DG and proactively plan for effective dispatch and control of DGs. Thesupports development; minimizing loss and detecting utility is doing this in a way that also providesoverload for network reinforcement; medium-term economic benefits, by leveraging network loadand long-term load forecasting; and load growth forecasting based on meter load profiles andanalysis. integrated weather data. Optimize network efficiency and reliability. The most common benefit utilities realize with ADMS deployment is enabling efficient and reliable network operations in the face of ever-growing constraints. A utility is deploying ADMS to manage its distribution network in a real-time manner to minimize losses and maximize reliability and safety. ADMS provides three operational approaches this utility can use for device management: availability of advanced tools and visual context; recommendation of the most optimal device operations; and automation of device operations. White paper | 10
  13. 13. Preparing for Distributed Energy ResourcesConclusionSecurity is of utmost importance when deploying ADMS in a mission-criticalenvironment. From a standards perspective, much work remains to be done to OASyS DNA securityaddress Smart Grid cyber security. There is significant benefit in developing ADMStechnology that addresses the evolving NERC CIP and NISTIR requirements. Telvent collaborates with Idaho National Laboratories (INL), the host of the United States Department of Energy’s NationalOne of the best ways to address security concerns is deploying a single solution SCADA test bed, in joint cyber securitythat integrates ADMS with SCADA technology with a proven, high-level of security, testing of Telvent Energy’s OASyS DNAreliability and performance. Of course, the SCADA incorporated in this solution SCADA infrastructure and in developing andmust: documenting best practices.• e able to support tens of thousands of intelligent field devices B• ave a robust reporting engine to deliver real-time data for critical business and H operational analysis and decisions• upport a ‘self-healing’ network architecture S• erform system-wide health monitoring P• e designed for standards compliance that will support long-term deployment BA comprehensive ADMS solution applies this combined-technology approach. Itcreates a single infrastructure and user interface for enterprise consistency andefficiency. With its comprehensive set of tools, utilities can perform monitoring,analysis, control, dispatch, planning and training for their distribution networks,using real-time, planning, or study modes.The most-advanced technology supports both three-phase balanced andunbalanced state estimation. With it, the utility can take advantage of advancedload management (DSDR), closed-loop control for self-healing automation, anddistributed energy resource modeling that supports economic decisions andreliability management. White paper | 11
  14. 14. ©2012 Schneider Electric. All rights reserved.Schneider Electric USA, Inc. 4701 Royal Vista Circle Fort Collins, CO 80528 Phone: -866-537-1091 1 + (34) 9-17-14-70-02 Fax: 1-970-223-5577 www.schneider-electric.com/us June 2012

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