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Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
Inspect and Adapt Workshop template
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Inspect and Adapt Workshop template

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This Scaled Agile Framework template is for use in the program-level Inspect and Adapt Workshop (see http://scaledagileframework.com/inspect-and-adapt). …

This Scaled Agile Framework template is for use in the program-level Inspect and Adapt Workshop (see http://scaledagileframework.com/inspect-and-adapt).

The Inspect and Adapt Workshop consists of quantitative and qualitative parts. Quantitatively, the teams demo the solution and self-assess how well they delivered features against the PSI objectives (the Release Predictability Measure) and review whatever additional program-level metrics they have agreed to. With this data in hand, the qualitative (i.e., subjective) part follows. For this, we recommend a structured “Inspect and Adapt” root cause analysis and corrective action-planning format, as we will describe in the details below.

The SAFE Inspect and Adapt workshop consists of three parts:

1. The solution demo and collection of customer feedback
2. Quantitative measurement
3. The problem solving workshop

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  • 1. 1© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC.Scaled Agile Framework ® is a trademark of Leffingwell, LLC.Inspect and AdaptApplying the Philosophy andDiscipline of “Kaizen Mind”Training . Certification . Communityacademy@scaledagile.comV5.3
  • 2. 2© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.AgendaInspect & Adapt ContextPart 1: The PSI Solution DemoPart 2: Quantitative MeasurementPart 3: The Problem Solving Workshop– Overview– Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone) Diagram– Pareto Chart– Corrective Action Plan
  • 3. 3© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Inspect & Adapt Context
  • 4. 4© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Predictive vs. Empirical ProcessIf a process is too unpredictable or too complicated for the planned,(predictive) approach, then the empirical approach (measure andadapt) is the method of choice. - Ken Schwaber
  • 5. 5© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Kaizen Mind70% of improvement processes that requirechange fail, mainly due to a lack of senseof urgency amongst leadership.- John Kotter, Harvard Business SchoolThere is a sense of danger.- Koki Konishi, Toyota City Technical Skills AcademyWe need “kaizen mind” an unending senseof crisis behind the company‟s constantdrive to improve.- Jeff Sutherland – co-creator of ScrumKaizen ( ) is Japanese for "change for the better" and refers to aphilosophy of continuous improvementThe „Toyota Way‟ Is Translated for aNew Generation of Foreign Managersby Marking Fackler, New Your Times,February, 2007
  • 6. 6© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Kaizen Mind ExampleExcerpt from a board presentation from a high performing agilecompany, in year 4 of agile
  • 7. 7© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Kaizen Mind and Lean Thinking– Go and See for yourself to thoroughly understand thesituation– Make decisions slowly by consensus, thoroughlyconsidering all options; implement decisions rapidly;– Become a learning organization through relentlessreflection– The Toyota WayContinuously solving root problems drives organizational learning
  • 8. 8© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Inspect and Adapt OverviewI&A has three parts: Part 1. The PSI demoof the solution’scurrent state toprogram stakeholders Part 2. Quantitativemeasurement Part 3. The problemsolving workshopTimebox: 3-4 hours perPSIInspect and Adapt (I&A) is to a Release Train what the sprint demoand retrospective are to a team
  • 9. 9© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 1: The PSI Solution Demo Often led by productmanagement and thesystem team Attended by businessowners, programstakeholders, productmanagement, releasetrain engineer(s), ScrumMasters, and teamsTeams demonstrate the current state of the solution to theappropriate stakeholders, thereby getting the fast feedback they needto steer a proper courseReprinted by Permission of Rally Software Development
  • 10. 10© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 2: Quantitative MeasurementsNotes Teams and businessowners self-assessthe percentage ofbusiness value theyachieved for eachobjective Each team’s plannedvs. actual can then berolled into theRelease PredictabilityReport Teams also reviewany other agreed tomeasuresAs part of the PSI Solution Demo, teams compare planned vs. actualbusiness value achieved for the PSI ObjectivesTeam Performance Report Other Metrics
  • 11. 11© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Release Predictability ReportThe Release Predictability Report show whether the PSI objectives %completion falls within an acceptable process control bandPSI 2 PSI 3 PSI 4PSI 1 PSI 5
  • 12. 12© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved. Establish accountability Create new stories Specify measurable results Set achievable deadlines Monitor progressPart 3: The Problem Solving WorkshopUsing root cause analysis, teams systematically address the largerimpediments that are limiting velocity
  • 13. 13© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 1: The PSI SolutionDemo
  • 14. 14© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Solution PSI DemoPSI 1 Demo1. System level demo2. Team 1 highlights3. Team 2 highlights4. Team 3 highlights5. ...Timebox:60 minutes(Insert anycontext slidesand stage thedemo using thisagenda)
  • 15. 15© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 2: QuantitativeMeasurements
  • 16. 16© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Team Performance AssessmentTimebox:30 minutesHow did we do? All teams’ PSI objectives were assigned abusiness value from 1-10 Review and rate your releaseachievements– How well did you do against your statedobjectives, including (a) timeliness, (b)content, and (c) quality?– Scale: (1-10), max being max totalbusiness value Average these across all objectives andgive yourself a program percentachievement score
  • 17. 17© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Other MetricsTimebox:30 minutesHow did we do? Collect and discuss any other programmetrics that the team has agreed tocollect(Insert anycontext slidesand stage themetrics reviewusing thisagenda)
  • 18. 18© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 3: The ProblemSolving Workshop Overview Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone)Diagram Pareto Chart Corrective Action Plan
  • 19. 19© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved. Establish accountability Create new stories Specify measurable results Set achievable deadlines Monitor progressPart 3: The Problem Solving WorkshopUsing root cause analysis, teams systematically address the largerimpediments that are limiting velocity
  • 20. 20© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Agree on the ProblemAgree on the Problem(s) to Solve1. Identify program issues and restate as problems– You may arrive at these through a variety of means:• Have Scrum Masters summarize top themes which emerged in their teamretrospectives and the improvement backlog items which were identified, targeted,and completed.• Collectively discuss program issues as a group– Restate the information you gather as succinct problem statements2. Vote on most important– Either select enough so each breakout group will have one, or have multiple groupswork on one in parallel3. Self organize into groups of 7 +/- 2 and select the problem your groupwill be analyzingTimebox:90 minutes
  • 21. 21© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 3: The ProblemSolving Workshop Overview Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone)Diagram Pareto Chart Corrective Action Plan
  • 22. 22© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Root Cause Analysis Diagram Definition: A graphic tool used to explore and displayopinion about sources of variation in a process.– Also called a Cause-and-Effect , Ishikawa Diagram (whofirst used the technique in the 1960s.) or FishboneDiagram.Source: wikipedia Purpose: To arrive at a few key sources that contribute mostsignificantly to the problem being examined.– These sources are then targeted for improvement.– Also illustrates the relationships among the wide variety of possiblecontributors to the effect. The name of a basic problem of interest is entered at the right of thediagram at the end of the main "bone".
  • 23. 23© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone) DiagramOur main “bones” representtypical sources of problemsin software
  • 24. 24© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Root Cause Analysis Diagram, contd. The main possible causes of the problem (the effect) aredrawn as bones off of the main backbone. The starting bones represent all possible influences. Brainstorming is typically done to add possible causes to themain "bones" and more specific causes to the "bones" onthe main "bones." This subdivision into ever increasing specificity continues aslong as the problem areas can be further subdivided. The practical maximum depth of this tree is usually four orfive levels. When the fishbone is complete, one has a complete pictureof all the possibilities about what could be the root cause forthe designated problem.Source: wikipedia
  • 25. 25© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.The 5 Why’s The 5 Whys is a question-asking method used to explorethe cause/effect relationships underlying a particularproblem. Ultimately, the goal of applying the 5 Whys method is todetermine a root cause of a defect or problem. A critical problem solving training component, integral toTotal Quality Management This tool is used routinely within Kaizen, lean manufacturing,and Six Sigma and TQM The architect of the Toyota Production System, TaiichiOhno, (Toyota Chairman) described the 5 whys method as"... ... by repeating why five times, the nature of the problemas well as its solution becomes clear.”Source: wikipedia
  • 26. 26© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Example ‒ The 5 Why’s Questioning could be taken further to a sixth, seventh, or greaterlevel. This would be legitimate, as the "five" in 5 Whys is not gospel;rather, it is postulated that five iterations of asking why is generallysufficient to get to a root cause. The key is to avoid assumptions and logic traps Instead trace the chain of causality in direct increments from theeffect to a root cause that still has some connection to the problem.My car will not start. (the problem)Why? - The battery is dead. (first why)Why? - The alternator is not functioning. (second why)Why? - The alternator belt has broken. (third why)Why? - The alternator belt was well beyond its useful service lifeand has never been replaced. (fourth why)Why? - I have not been maintaining my car according to therecommended service schedule. (fifth why, root cause)Source: wikipedia
  • 27. 27© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone) DiagramCause 1Cause ofcause 1Cause ofcause ofcause 1Cause ofcause ofcause ofcause 1Cause ofcause ofcause ofcause ofcause 1
  • 28. 28© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Root Cause AnalysisCreate Your Fishbone Diagram Succinctly state the problem you are addressing Create a fishbone diagram for your problem statement Brainstorm potential causes of the problem, and place themon the chart For each cause identified, use the 5 whys technique to get toa potential root cause Prepare to present your resultTimebox:45 minutes
  • 29. 29© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 3: The ProblemSolving Workshop Overview Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone)Diagram Pareto Chart Corrective Action Plan
  • 30. 30© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Pareto Analysis Pareto analysis is a statisticaltechnique in decision making thatis used for selection of a limitednumber of tasks that producesignificant overall effect. It uses the Pareto principle –20% of the work can generate80% of the advantage of doingthe entire job. In terms of quality improvement,a large majority of problems(80%) are produced by a few keycauses (20%).Source: wikipedia
  • 31. 31© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Pareto Analysis (cont’d) Useful where many possible courses of action arecompeting for your attention. The problem-solver estimates the benefitdelivered by each action, then selects a number ofthe most effective actions that deliver a totalbenefit reasonably close to the maximal possibleone. Helps stimulate thinking and organize thoughts.Source: wikipedia
  • 32. 32© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Prioritize Root CausesCause 1Cause ofcause 1Cause of cause ofcause 1Cause of cause ofcause of cause 1Cause ofcause 1
  • 33. 33© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Pareto AnalysisResult: a histogram of relative importance of root causes012345678910Cause 1 Cause 2 cause 3 Cause 4 Cause 5 Cause 6
  • 34. 34© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Pareto AnalysisCreate Your Pareto Chart Use a cumulative voting technique todo a Pareto analysis of eachidentified root cause Each team member gets 10 votes Place your votes on as few or asmany (limit 5 votes per item) rootcauses as appropriate Refactor, re-aggregate causes asappropriate Use that data to create a big visiblehistogram chart Prepare to present your resultTimebox:30 minutes0246810Cause1Cause2cause3Cause4Cause5Cause6
  • 35. 35© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Part 3: The ProblemSolving Workshop Overview Root Cause Analysis (Fishbone)Diagram Pareto Chart Corrective Action Plan
  • 36. 36© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.After we determine we have aproblem, what’s next?a. Ignore it - the problem may go awayb. Blame it on another teamc. Blame it on the business ownerd. Blame it on another programe. Create a Corrective Action PlanHouston, we have a problem.Answer:e. Create a Corrective Action PlanHouston, wehave aproblem...
  • 37. 37© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action PlanWhat is a CorrectiveAction Plan anyway?Corrective – A different courseof actionAction – Active steps we canrealistically accomplishPlan –Organized, purposeful, accountable, measurable
  • 38. 38© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Effective Corrective Action Plans1. State the new problem (theselected root cause)succinctly2. Brainstorm some potentialsolutions3. Break it into parts. Takeresponsibility4. Specify measurable results5. Set achievable deadlines6. Monitor progressHouston, wehave a plan!CorrectiveActionPlan
  • 39. 39© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components1. State the new problemclearly and succinctly• Pick one specific root cause,i.e. the top root cause thatyou identified in your paretoanalysis• Restate that as the newproblemClearly restate your problem
  • 40. 40© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components2. Brainstorm a solution• Brainstorm prospectivesolutions with the team• Cumulative vote onsuggested next stepsBrainstorm solutionsVote on next steps
  • 41. 41© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components3. Take responsibility• Identify the stories you’llneed to effect the solution• Take responsibility for stories• Prepare to put the stories onyour release planKnow who‟s owning what
  • 42. 42© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components4. Specify measurableresults• What measures can we useto track progress?What does progress look like?
  • 43. 43© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components5. Set achievabledeadlines• Not too fast• Not too slow• Not TBDAction 1March 16thAction 2April 11thAction 3May 1stMake your goals achievable
  • 44. 44© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action Plan Components6. Monitor Progress• How will we track our actionsteps?• How will we know when thisis no longer the biggestproblem?• Define what “done” meansfor the Corrective Action PlanMake your progress asvisible as your problems
  • 45. 45© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Corrective Action PlanBuild Your Corrective Action Plan Pick the top root cause on your Pareto chart Restate it as a problem Build a corrective action plan. This will createyour program improvement backlog items Prepare to present your results to the groupTimebox:60 minutes
  • 46. 46© 2008 - 2013 Scaled Agile, Inc. and Leffingwell, LLC. All rights reserved.Questions?

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