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Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
Seattle Access It Stats
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Seattle Access It Stats

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IT use statistics for City of Seattle. by David Keyes

IT use statistics for City of Seattle. by David Keyes

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • 16% answered, 96% completed Not 17.5% cell only (13.3% cell/land line – no answer)‏
  • High Speed breakdown: 50% cable/32% DSL. Home computer: Desktop 31%, laptop 22%, both48% Having a cell phone in the family increased from 70% to 86%. Having any home computer 76% to 88% 2000 – 2009. Note high speed Internet access from 18% to 74%. The national average for home Internet access 2007 was 62% according to the most recent survey we could find (USA Today, 2009). So, either interpret that Seattle’s ahead (which we are) or that it’s tougher to be disconnected in a very connected region (also true)‏
  • Education and income are strongest predictors of access to most technology. Exception: Satellite is reverse.
  • Education and income are strongest predictors of access to most technology. Exception: Satellite is reverse.
  • Note Hispanics and Satellite TV
  • About ten percent of 2009 survey respondents reported that they have “a disability, handicap, or chronic disease that keeps [them] from participating fully in work, school, housework or other activities .” Figure 9 shows that residents with disabilities are less likely to have access to cell phones and to computer-related technology than residents without disabilities, although they are as likely to have access to cable and satellite TV.   This gap in IT access may be particularly troubling because the use of technology, both standard IT technology and specialized assistive technology, has proved to be a powerful tool. We’ll come back to this  
  • Both those at the high end of access and those at the low end believe that access to the internet is important. When asked what one thing, if anything, would improve your Internet service the most, price was named first (47%) followed by speed (26.7%). Value of higher speed service:  Just over three-fourths of computer or Internet users felt it would valuable to have significantly faster Internet service. 41.6% said very valuable and 36.1% said somewhat valuable.
  • Important distribution – shows in many ways the value of bring online – looking for a job, job training. Health information.
  • Significant differences by ethnicity (African Americans are least likely to download a podcast; Caucasians most likely to make an online donation; Asians and African Americans less likely to get health information, etc.)‏ Disability: People with disabilities less likely to express comfort with various tasks (sending e-mail attachments, opening and closing a file, searching the web)‏
  • Increase in use of government website to obtain information varies with many variables, including ethnicity, age, etc. This figure indicates that the big increases (among all respondents, and among self-identified computers users) was in respondents with more than a high-school education.
  • For graduate students: 79% wanted to contact gov via web or email. 90% cell only users vs 44% with land line. Wanted to give opinion via email or online survey (87% overall, 93% cell users)‏
  • More than half of respondents in 2009 say they participate in some type of community group. 2/3rds of these visit a website or belong to an e-mail list. Much less likely to participant among Latinos and especially Spanish speakers. Participant rises with income as well. Communicating with Government: Online access to government perceived as more important over time. Telephone still very important, in-person contact less so. But this Figure points out that this varies dramatically by ethnicity. Asians and Caucasians far more likely to prefer the web or e-mail access to government than are African Americans and Hispanics, each of which is relatively more comfortable with the telephone. For graduate students: 79% wanted to contact gov via web or email.
  • High interest in using Internet and tech more…they know it’s the future. People recognize the disparity between those who have and are able to use pc and Internet Need for more low-cost training, purchasing, maintenance. Tech: High interest in using Internet and tech more…they know it’s the future. People recognize the disparity between those who have and are able to use pc and Internet Need for more low-cost training, purchasing, maintenance. Use trusted places Need home access and chance to practice Use trusted places Need home access and chance to practice
  • Transcript

    • 1. 2009 Information Technology Residential Survey
      • Measures based on city & community goals
      • Follows up 2000 & 2004 Seattle surveys
      • 1064 Phone Surveys
      • Oversamples of Hispanic/Latino and African-Americans
      • 10 Focus Groups with 310 community members
      • Filipino, Spanish Language, African Americans, Somali, Korean, Chinese, Vietnamese, & Grad Students, including many cell only users
    • 2.
    • 3.
    • 4.
    • 5.
    • 6. About 10% reported “a disability, handicap, or chronic disease that keeps [them] from participating fully in work, school, housework or other activities .”
    • 7. How to improve Internet: Price (47%), Speed (26.7%)‏
    • 8.
    • 9.
    • 10.
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13. Civic engagement
      • Just over half participate in a community group. Slightly less get information about their local community via web or e-list.
      • African Americans more likely to participate, but not electronically. Caucasian respondents were more likely to participate both in person and electronically.75% willing to be contacted
    • 14.
    • 15.
    • 16. From The Focus Groups It’s important for everyone, esp. our kids. Computers are expensive, and so is Internet access Lots of people in our community are afraid of Hackers and Scams I wish I could get free Internet access in order to make my home expenses lower – and we would often use the Internet We need more computers in (Chinese, Spanish, Vietnamese, Somali, Korean…)‏ Trusted and culturally relevant places and teachers are important
    • 17.
      • High interest, want to give opinions.
      • Need to address comfort and trust.
      • Need full services in their language.
      • Barrier could be literacy, and/or English.
      • May not know what participation means.
      From The Focus Groups: Government Info
    • 18. In sum
      • We’re well wired.
      • High interest in more speed.
      • Still disturbing difference in access level and use of services.
      • Cost is largest barrier for entry and high speed.
    • 19.
      • High speed Internet cost
      • Training
      • Help purchasing computers
      • Maintaining them safely and securely
      How to increase technology adoption
    • 20. For more info
      • Information Technology Access and Adoption in Seattle
      • Seattle.gov/tech/indicators

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