Student engagement presentation cj

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  • Nuts and bolts – seating activityContent – finding the right activities for the right group
  • Discuss my naive perceptions about how students were going to be automatically engaged by listening to my voice.
  • Activity: what does this mean to you?Give one to a pair and discuss.Energy – is a pendulum – you get out of it what you put into it.Enthusiasm – again, trainer let. You need to invest yourself and your personality into your presentationsEngagement – Being switched on, the student who leans forward and nods at your every sentenceEntertainment – training is part education, part entertainment. Again, be unique with your personality (Marcs xylophones and music).For me I find international training to be exciting because it pushes me outside of my comfort zone all the time and I think outside the box.
  • Discussion of training course I attended – the people who where there and the activities we didGTKY activities are great for orientation or first classesOpeners/Warm Ups great for each day – to get students in the zoneEnergisers – to change the topic or to gain flagging interestEngagers – to make the content a bit more funSummaries – to reflect on what has been learnedActivity: share experiences in any of these activities. Pair/Share
  • There is obviously a balance that needs to be reached, but we all know that injecting some fun into our day at the very least lifts our mood.Give example that Marc did of the orange activity in Safety
  • Hi-Five – Index card and they must meet 5 other people and ask them each 1 question, record the answer on the cards, pick a random person and ask the class what they have learned about that person.People Bingo – find a person who’s wearing green shoes, purple hair, who has children, etcJargon Jumble – good for getting students used to technical termsGoogle Race – harnessing technology and getting students on their phones to research the answer to a questionTerror cards – Having a card with each students name on it, during the course the cards will be drawn when a question needs to be answered, so every one gets a turn but acknowledges that answering questions is hard and keeps students on their toes.A-Z I’ve used successfully in Safety and Diversity. The fun bit is doing XYZ180 review – emails in class – what did you learn today? What do you still not understand
  • Dominator – use the dominator to write on the board, Wandering – Move forward to apply pressure, move back to release; use proximity to demand attention; emotional stories from the lwft side of the room and jokes from the right; bring some theatre to your movementsGetting students back – play music or musical instrumentTake away – hand out menus
  • Take away
  • Student engagement presentation cj

    1. 1. Student Engagement How to use activities in the classroom
    2. 2. Engaging and Enlivening your Audience
    3. 3. The Four E’s to Learning • • • • Energy Enthusiasm Engagement Entertainment
    4. 4. The Trainer’s Toolkit • • • • • Get-to-know-you activities Openers/Warm-ups Energisers Engagers Fun Summaries
    5. 5. Make it Fun! • “Life can be stressful enough with the rigors of work, family, study and other personal commitments, for you to let the mediocre take over your training.” • “Be the champion of your own environment. Be the Fun Master! Be prepared to try something different. It might be something small that has a huge effect on the audience.”
    6. 6. Caroline’s Fail-Proof Activities • Get to Know You – Hi-Five, People Bingo • Engagers – Jargon Jumble, Google Race, Terror Cards • Fun Revision – A to Z, 180 degree review
    7. 7. Classroom Strategies • • • • The Dominator Wandering with Purpose Getting students back from activities Take-away
    8. 8. Final Thoughts… • Learning should be fun; • Collaboration is good; • Participants should be in the game, not sitting on the sideline; • Games should have some purpose or link back to content.

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