FAME-MACHINE

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  • http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/11/business/media/11youtube.html
  • http://paigepiskin.com/social-media/how-much-do-youtube-partners-make
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/michellephan
  • Independent YouTube partners (not part of a brand or media company)Using $0.75 per thousand viewsJuly 2009 to July 2010http://www.businessinsider.com/meet-the-richest-independent-youtube-stars-2010-8#10-natalie-tran-101000-1
  • He is an exception and others charge a lot less
  • $10,000 per tweet  company limits1 tweet per day  $3.5 million a year
  • YouTube Haulers Elle & Bair Fowler got paid $4,000 to conduct a product review on SunLove’s tan spryOverall, different celebrities make money in different ways and some make more money than others depending on how they can monetize what they do and the interests from companies
  • Information which users have the choice to interpret and is not asked to click or purchaseHowever, misleading and biased information is created when celebrities have an incentive to recommend the products and thus should be disclosed  this is also required by the Federal Trade CommissionsBut, most people do not follow these rules. From companies to agencies, they are not telling the people that the payment should be disclosed.
  • Meet Joe
  • Wmv
  • Celebrity endorsements have been the bedrock of Pepsi's advertising. Over the years, Pepsi has used and continues to use a number of celebrities for general market and targeted advertising, including Shaquille O'Neal, Mary J. Blige, Wyclef Jean, and Busta Rhymes, who did a targeted campaign for their Mountain Dew product.George Foreman for Meineke. He has also sold more than 10 million Lean Mean Fat-- Reducing Grilling Machines since signing with the manufacturing company.Nike golf balls, since the company signed Tiger Woods in 1996, have seen a $50 million revenue growth. Nike's golf line grossed more than $250 million in annual sales. In 2000 he renegotiated a five-year contract estimated at $125 million.Venus Williams, tennis player and Wimbledon champion has signed a five-year $40 million contract with sportswear manufacturer Reebok International Inc.
  • Establishment of Credibility: Approval of a brand by a star fosters a sense of trust for that brand among the target audience- this is especially true in case of new products. We had the Shah Rukh-Santro campaign. At launch, Shah Rukh Khan endorsed Santro and this ensured that brand awareness was created in a market, which did not even know the brand.Ensured Attention: Celebrities ensure attention of the target group by breaking the clutter of advertisements and making the ad and the brand more noticeable.PR coverage : is another reason for using celebrities. Managers perceive celebrities as topical, which create high PR coverage. A good example of integrated celebrity campaigns is one of the World’s leading pop groups, the Spice Girls, who have not only appeared in advertisements for Pepsi, but also in product launching and PR events. Indeed, celebrity-company marriages are covered by most media from television to newspapers (e.g. The Spice Girls and Pepsi)Higher degree of recall: People tend to commensurate the personalities of the celebrity with the brand thereby increasing the recall value. Golf champion Tiger Woods has endorsed American Express, Rolex, and Nike. Actress Catherine Zeta-Jones is used by T-Mobile and Elizabeth Arden. 007 Pierce Brosnan promotes Omega, BMW, and Noreico.Associative Benefit: A celebrity’s preference for a brand gives out a persuasive message - because the celebrity is benefiting from the brand, the consumer will also benefit.Mitigating a tarnished image: Cadbury India wanted to restore the consumer's confidence in its chocolate brands following the high-pitch worms controversy; so the company appointed AmitabhBachchan for the job. Last year, when the even more controversial pesticide issue shook up Coca-Cola and PepsiCo and resulted in much negative press, both soft drink majors put out high-profile damage control ad films featuring their best and most expensive celebrities. While Aamir Khan led the Coke fightback as an ingenious and fastidious Bengali who finally gets convinced of the product's `purity,' PepsiCo brought Shah Rukh Khan and SachinTendulkar together once again in a television commercial which drew references to the `safety' of the product indirectly.Psychographic Connect: Celebrities are loved and adored by their fans and advertisers use stars to capitalise on these feelings to sway the fans towards their brand.Demographic Connect: Different stars appeal differently to various demographic segments (age, gender, class, geography etc.).Mass Appeal: Some stars have a universal appeal and therefore prove to be a good bet to generate interest among the masses.Rejuvenating a stagnant brand: With the objective of infusing fresh life into the stagnant chyawanprash category and staving off competition from various brands, Dabur India roped in Bachchan for an estimated Rs 8 crore.Celebrity endorsement can sometimes compensate for lack of innovative ideas.
  • http://internationalentertainment.blogspot.com/2011/10/viva-glam-spokesperson-lady-gaga-and.html
  • Beat
  • If the Kate Moss scandal of 2005 showed anything, it was the power of celebrity endorsement. Three companies immediately opted out of their contracts with the supermodel after a tabloid published a photo of her allegedly snorting cocaine. Burberry, Chanel and H&M all panicked that she would bring their brands down on her fall from grace. Conversely, when celebrity endorsement works, it can be a dream partnership between brand and personality and the result is, quite simply, a huge upturn in sales.
  • http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2011/08/16/abercrombie-and-fitch-offer-to-pay-the-situation-to-stop-wearing-their-clothes/
  • Cybill ShepherdIn 1986, the Beef Industry Council hired actress Cybill Shepherd to expound on her beef cravings for the "real food for real people" campaign. Within weeks of the campaign starting in January 1987, however, Shepherd admitted in public that she tried to "stay away from red meat." In January 1988, her contract was not renewed.The reputation of the celebrity may derogate after he/she has endorsed the product: Pepsi Cola's suffered with three tarnished celebrities - Mike Tyson, Madonna, and Michael Jackson. Since the behaviour of the celebrities reflects on the brand, celebrity endorsers may at times become liabilities to the brands they endorse.The vampire effect: This terminology pertains to the issue of a celebrity overshadowing the brand. If there is no congruency between the celebrity and the brand, then the audience will remember the celebrity and not the brand. Examples are the campaigns of Dawn French—Cable Association and Leonard Rossiter—Cinzano. Both of these campaigns were aborted due to celebrities getting in the way of effective communication. Another example could be the Castrol commercial featuring RahulDravid.Inconsistency in the professional popularity of the celebrity: The celebrity may lose his or her popularity due to some lapse in professional performances. For example, when Tendulkar went through a prolonged lean patch recently, the inevitable question that cropped up in corporate circles - is he actually worth it? The 2003 Cricket World Cup also threw up the Shane Warne incident, which caught Pepsi off guard. With the Australian cricketer testing positive for consuming banned substances and his subsequent withdrawal from the event, bang in the middle of the event, PepsiCo - the presenting sponsor of the World Cup 2003 - found itself on an uneasy wicketMulti brand endorsements by the same celebrity would lead to overexposure: The novelty of a celebrity endorsement gets diluted if he does too many advertisements. This may be termed as commoditisation of celebrities, who are willing to endorse anything for big bucks. Example, MRF was among the early sponsors of Tendulkar with its logo emblazoned on his bat. But now Tendulkar endorses a myriad brands and the novelty of the Tendulkar-MRF campaign has scaled down.Celebrities endorsing one brand and using another (competitor): Sainsbury’s encountered a problem with Catherina Zeta Jones, whom the company used for its recipe advertisements, when she was caught shopping in Tesco. A similar case happened with Britney Spears who endorsed one cola brand and was repeatedly caught drinking another brand of cola on tape.Mismatch between the celebrity and the image of the brand: Celebrities manifest a certain persona for the audience. It is of paramount importance that there is an egalitarian congruency between the persona of the celebrity and the image of the brand. Each celebrity portrays a broad range of meanings, involving a specific personality and lifestyle. Madonna, for example, is perceived as a tough, intense and modern women associated with the lower middle class. The personality of Pierce Brosnan is best characterized as the perfect gentlemen, whereas Jennifer Aniston has the image of the ‘good girl from next door’.
  • Angelina Jolie was paid as much as $10 million as the new face of Louis Vuitton, above. LeBron James signed a $90 million deal with Nike when he was still in high school. Rapper 50 Cent negotiated a executive office with Vitamin Water and raked in tens of millions of dollars upon endorsing it. Catherine Zeta-Jones got paid $20 million to endorse T-Mobile (and that was before her contract extension and raise).
  • Dan O'Brien and Dave JohnsonDuring the 1992 summer Olympics, Reebok spent $25 million on an ad campaign featuring the two track and field stars. Dan vs. Dave commercials ran almost non-stop, asking which would be the world's best athlete and saying that the debate would be settled in Barcelona. The fact that Dan failed did not win a single medal in '92 when he failed to score in the pole vault and Dave only captured bronze on a broken foot made the spots downright laughable
  • When a product or service is endorsed by a celebrity, more than three-quarters answered that it has no impact on their intent to buy,” Adweek reports. “Just 4 percent said it makes them more likely to purchase.”And when consumers get up to retirement age, celebrity endorsements can actually work against a product, according to the poll. For those 55 and older, 19% noted that a celebrity endorsement might cause them to not buy a particular brand.http://www.brandchannel.com/home/post/2011/06/14/Celebrity-Endorsements-Study-Adweek.aspx
  • Celebrity endorsements have been the bedrock of Pepsi's advertising. Over the years, Pepsi has used and continues to use a number of celebrities for general market and targeted advertising, including Shaquille O'Neal, Mary J. Blige, Wyclef Jean, and Busta Rhymes, who did a targeted campaign for their Mountain Dew product.George Foreman for Meineke. He has also sold more than 10 million Lean Mean Fat-- Reducing Grilling Machines since signing with the manufacturing company.Nike golf balls, since the company signed Tiger Woods in 1996, have seen a $50 million revenue growth. Nike's golf line grossed more than $250 million in annual sales. In 2000 he renegotiated a five-year contract estimated at $125 million.Venus Williams, tennis player and Wimbledon champion has signed a five-year $40 million contract with sportswear manufacturer Reebok International Inc.
  • Haulers with corporate sponsors sometimes host contests, giving away products as a way to attract new subscribers. Sometimes the women are paid a commission: Maryapril Bautista of Los Angeles, for example, says she earns a 15 percent commission from a hair care company, Flat Iron Experts, on sales generated by her product reviews.
  • Contracts are very short
  • http://www.xconomy.com/seattle/2011/03/30/lady-gagas-favorite-seattle-tech-startup-clarisonic-cracks-big-time-with-100m-sales/2/
  • rs get up to retirement age, celebrity endorsements can actually work against a product, according to the poll. For those 55 and older, 19% noted that a celebrity endorsement might cause them to not buy a particular brand.http://www.brandchannel.com/home/post/2011/06/14/Celebrity-Endorsements-Study-Adweek.aspx
  • FAME-MACHINE

    1. 1. ‘Everybody will be world famous for 15 minutes’
    2. 2.  create and publish content, to share ideas, to vote on them, and to recommend things to others…etc. WELL. IT’S POSSIBLE…!
    3. 3.  A term used most often by others to label someone who is perceived to have a great deal of depth and experience in a certain topic / subject & use SM to showcase & execute their skills Blogs, video channels, personal websites, forums, etc. Ordinary, regular people Community
    4. 4. FAME = Personal Branding + Publicity + Brand You Market + Personal Financial Development + Brand Longevity Strategies SUPER SIMPLE. RIGHT?
    5. 5.  ―from expectation to trial to rating to sharing the actual experience—is now a part of most every purchase or conversion process‖
    6. 6. Celebrity Endorsements KimKardashian Kim Kardashian @ancredible is about to share an awesome presentation on celeb endorsements via #socialmedia! 2 minutes ago
    7. 7. AGENDA1. Effectiveness2. Advantages3. Tools4. Issues
    8. 8. Effectiveness
    9. 9. Awareness
    10. 10. Famousfaces VS. Ordinary faces
    11. 11. Desire to emulate
    12. 12. Meaning Movement and theEndorsement Process Grant McCracken (2009)
    13. 13. Advantages
    14. 14. Millions of followers
    15. 15. 1 millionfollowersin 1 day= #winning
    16. 16. Typical ads = easily ignored
    17. 17. Tools
    18. 18. Moms
    19. 19. Sports Fans
    20. 20. Teen Girls
    21. 21. Teen Boys
    22. 22. Women 18-24
    23. 23. Men 18-24
    24. 24. Issues
    25. 25. Skepticism…
    26. 26. Scandals
    27. 27.  Celebrity gossip/chatter host on YouTube  Quit full time administrative assistant job Revenue: $100,000+ yearly from YouTube Costs: $2,000 camera + $6 backdrop
    28. 28.  Make money through advertisements on your videos  Clicks or every 1000 impressions
    29. 29.  Monetize all videos 1,000+ subscribers & regular uploads Video Views: $2.5 to $5 per 1000 views Channel Views: $0.01 per channel view
    30. 30.  Video: $2.4 million Channel: $0.75 million Total $3.15 million
    31. 31.  TubeMogul  Research and advertising agency Celebrity Revenue $ Shane Dawson 315,000 Annoying 288,000 Orange Ryan Higa 151,000 Fred 146,000 Smosh 113,000 Natalie Tran 101,000
    32. 32.  Banners & text ads Google Adsense Amount charged depends on: › Popularity/Visits › # of ads › # competitors › # interested advertisers › How much advertisers are willing to pay
    33. 33. $0.5 million a year
    34. 34.  Companies gives products or money for recommendations
    35. 35. Should they disclose they are getting paid? • Visible ads (YouTube/Blogs) that No recognizable by a reasonableDisclosure person • Hard to recognize ads that are biased (Recommendations)Disclosure • Federal Trade Commission requires disclosure People do not follow these rules!
    36. 36. Meet JOE
    37. 37. Celebrity Endorsements Hmm!
    38. 38. Sexy DancerLegs
    39. 39. • Ensured Attention – PR coverage – Higher degree of recall 15-20 million $!
    40. 40. • Rejuvenating a stagnant brand – Compensate for lack of innovative ideas.
    41. 41. • Mass Appeal – Psychographic Connect – Demographic Connect
    42. 42. • CO-Creation
    43. 43. There are risks... Hmmmm..... .
    44. 44. • The vampire effect What brand was she promoting again?
    45. 45. • Mismatch between the celebrity and the image of the brand
    46. 46. • Multi brand endorsements by the same celebrity would lead to overexposure – Celebrities endorsing one brand and using an other (competitor)
    47. 47. • Cost
    48. 48. • The reputation of the celebrity may der ogate after he/she has endorsed the pr oduct. – Inconsistency in the professional popularity of the celebrity
    49. 49. In the end people always forget...
    50. 50. So Does it Work?According to Adweek... 4% 78% 18% BUT
    51. 51. BrandAwareness/Equity
    52. 52. YouTube Celebrity Endorsements Hmm!
    53. 53. • Cost –Promotional tactics Promo Codes + Discounts Contests
    54. 54. • Specified Target audience – More relatable and trusted by consumers Companies only selling New and starting companies online
    55. 55. • Measurement of success –Feedback 11, 038,984 Views!
    56. 56. • Less Risk – Can pull out without being noticed – Can use multiple Youtube celebrities
    57. 57. There are risks...• http://www.gurugossip.net/t394p175-bad-experience-with-products-gurus-rave-about
    58. 58. • Youtube personalities must state that the product was endorsed Juicy Tuesday Fowler Sisters
    59. 59. • It stays on YouTube Forever...
    60. 60. Increase Sales/ Gain new consumers to try it out
    61. 61. The ultimate product: The ClarasonicStep 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 3
    62. 62. So Does it Work?
    63. 63.  Are they better role models or just ordinary people who do not deserve celebrity status?
    64. 64.  29% have bought a celebrity endorsed product 57% have bought a product mentioned by a Guru
    65. 65. Celebrity Endorsements: -way to raise price of product -self-benefiting
    66. 66. Guru Endorsements: -want information, not an advertisement -easy to pick out the ones being paid -avoid reviews
    67. 67. • WOM -speaker motivation: expert status -listener motivation: people of goodwill and bearers of tangible evidence
    68. 68. Future of Social Media Fame and Endorsements
    69. 69. X1=Create a twitter account X2=Follow targeted people X3=People will follow you back X4=Tweet relevant information to that target audience
    70. 70. How do you feel about brands paying celebrities andothers to post on social networks? I think it’s ineffective and unethical — 28.41% I don’t have an ethical problem with it, but I think it’s ineffective — 26.14% I think it brings in business, but it makes me uncomfortable – 25.00% I think it is a fine tactic that delivers results – 20.45%
    71. 71. First Generation Stars
    72. 72. Celebrities
    73. 73. 490 Million Users÷5 Million Subscribers= 1 in every 100 viewers$150,000÷5 million subscribers= Approximately $0.03 per subscriber700 Million Users÷100= Approximately 7 Million Subscribers7 Million x 0.03= 210,000=Adjusted for Inflation $236,500
    74. 74. Federal Trade Commission “FTC will levy a fine of $11,000 on anymarketers (e.g. reviewers, bloggers, users ofFacebook, Twitter, etc.) that endorse a productand fail to disclose a relationship with the makerof that product (if one exists). ”

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