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Four Perspectives
on Change Management
July 2014
Emer O’Kelly, Regional Director
Europe, Chazey Partners
Ann-Marie Massenb...
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
INTRODUCTION	
  
Why	
  do	
  projects	
  ...
1	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
Change	
   Management	
   is	
   all...
2	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
adoption	
  by	
  the	
  receiving	
...
3	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
Failings	
  in	
  Change	
  Manageme...
4	
  
	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  	
  
	
  	
  
	
  
Kayzad	
  Hir...
5	
  
	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  	
  
	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
Customer...
6	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
Kayzad	
  Hiramanek,	
  COO	
  
Avan...
7	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
What	
  are	
  3	
  core	
  factors	...
8	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
are	
  around	
  10-­‐15%).	
  Abili...
9	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
CONCLUSION	
  
Change	
  Management	...
10	
  
Chazey	
  Partners	
  Practitioners’	
  Corner	
  │	
  Change	
  Management	
  
For	
  more	
  articles	
  about	
 ...
North America | Latin America | Europe | Middle East | Africa | Asia
Email: enquiries@chazeypartners.com | Web: www.chazey...
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Four Perspectives on Change Management

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What Can an Automotive Products Manufacturer, a US Federal Government Agency, and an Indian Insurance Giant Tell You about Change Management? Quite a lot, judging by the scars they all bear. We asked them why they believe some Shared Services or Business Transformation projects fail, what mistakes they have made, and what they would do differently if they had another chance. It all boils down to Change Management: how it's planned, communicated, and managed. Think it's easy? Read on ...

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Transcript of "Four Perspectives on Change Management"

  1. 1. Four Perspectives on Change Management July 2014 Emer O’Kelly, Regional Director Europe, Chazey Partners Ann-Marie Massenberg, Chief of Staff, Program Support Center, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Kayzad Hiramanek, COO, Avantha ERGO Life Insurance Richard J. Rowan, Jr., Director, Global Shared Services, TRW Automotive
  2. 2. Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   INTRODUCTION   Why  do  projects  fail?  A  simple  enough  question.  If  you  analysed  a  hundred  answers,  you’d  find   the  common  denominator  to  be  “ill-­‐planned  and  ill-­‐implemented  change.”   But  despite  the  lip  service  given  to  change  management  as  a  “core  enabler”  of  project   implementations  like  Shared  Services,  the  evidence  supporting  its  deployment  is  still  weak.   We’ve  asked  some  of  Chazey’s  clients  and  fellow  practitioners,  all  of  whom  have  led,  and   continue  to  lead,  Shared  Services  implementations  or  transformations  and  who  have  first-­‐hand   experience  of  operating  at  the  frontline,  to  comment  on  key  mistakes  made  in  planning,  tips  on   managing  customer  resistance,  and  advice  on  how  to  get  it  right,  first  time.   THE  PITFALLS  OF  “CHANGE”   o Change  Management  is  all  too  frequently  underestimated  or  insufficiently  accounted for  in  corporate  transitions.  Why  is  this  important? o Failings  in  Change  Management  boil  down,  time  and  again,  to  overlooking  a  few  key stepping  stones.  What  are  the  most  common  mistakes? o Customer  resistance  is  one  of  the  biggest  obstacles  to  change.  How  can  you  work around  this  constructively? o What  are  3  core  factors  to  consider  that  ensure  Change  Management  supports  your objectives?
  3. 3. 1   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   Change   Management   is   all   too   frequently   underestimated   or   insufficiently   accounted  for  in  corporate  transitions.  Why  is  this  important?     Emer  O’Kelly   Regional  Director  Europe   Chazey  Partners   Any  significant  change  to  a  business’s  operations,  including  a  transformation  of   its  support  services,  requires  a  clear  vision  and  strategy  in  order  to  have  a   fighting  chance  of  succeeding.  This  vision  needs  to  be  clearly  linked  to  the   challenges  facing  the  business,  make  realistic  allowance  for  the  circumstances   but,  above  all,  be  demonstrably  supported  by  the  key  leaders  in  the  business.   Actions  must  mirror  words  and  many  an  initiatives  has  been  “damned  by  faint   praise”  by  those  senior  people  in  the  company,  who  others  look  to  for   leadership,  and  have  faded  away  as  a  result.   Major  organisational  changes  require  business  leaders  to  show  their  mettle  and   this  includes  giving  true  commitment  and  guidance  which  others  can  focus  on,   follow  and  build  on  themselves.  This  applies  especially  to  a  transformation  or   migration  to  a  shared  services  structure,  where  there  is  a  natural  fall-­‐back   position  of  continuing  to  do  what  was  done  before,  regardless  of  what  is   happening  at  the  front-­‐end  of  the  business  in  terms  of  market  changes,  product   development  and  customer  expectations.   Transmitting  the  vision,  internally  and  externally,  is  critical  to  successful  change   and  under-­‐committing  to  communicating  this  can  slow  down,  or  even  de-­‐rail   success  of  an  otherwise  well  planned  initiatives.  The  ideal  is  to  build  a  guiding   coalition  of  people  who  are  evangelical  about  the  project  and  who  will  foster   emotional  engagement  and  ownership  of  the  solutions.     Ann-­‐Marie  Massenberg,  Chief  of  Staff,  Program  Support  Center   U.S.  Department  of  Health  &  Human  Services     SSO  implementations  by  their  nature  involve  a  certain  amount  of  angst  on  the   part  of  the  organization  that  is  transitioning  from  a  self-­‐serve  model  to  an   outsourced  model.  Typically,  there  tends  to  be  a  feeling  of  loss  of  control,   concern  about  responsiveness  and  quality,  and  a  general  sense  of  uncertainty.   Couple  that  with  the  mechanics  and  coordination  involved  in  shutting  down   one’s  own  operation  and  transitioning  that  to  a  shared  service  provider  (e.g.   transitioning  data,  performing  business  process  improvements,  and   configuration)  and  it  can  be  incredibly  overwhelming.  In  this  situation,  when   change  management  is  lacking,  the  impact  to  the  implementation  can  be  costly.   Without  change  management,  SSO  implementations  stand  the  risk  of  poor  
  4. 4. 2   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   adoption  by  the  receiving  organization.  Stakeholders  who  are  confronted  with   change,  and  not  supported  with  a  comprehensive  change  management  strategy   that  includes  a  clear  vision  of  the  end  state,  informative  and  consistent   communications,  and  inclusive  involvement  in  the  change  activities,  are  more   likely  to  produce  undesired  results.  These  include,  delays,  errors  that  require   extensive  re-­‐work,  and  poor  morale.   Kayzad  Hiramanek,  COO   Avantha  ERGO  Life  Insurance   The  basic  human  nature  is  resistance  to  change.  Therefore  to  say  that  any  form   of  transition  or  change  will  cause  upheaval  within  and  outside  an  organization  is   stating  the  obvious.    The  most  common  issues  reported  in  poor  change   management  and  the  resultant  consequences  include  an  atmosphere  of   uncertainty,  talent  attrition,  staff  de-­‐  motivation,  inter  department  politicking   and  one-­‐upmanship.  All  new  initiatives  will  be  still  born  and  the  overall   organization  agenda  will  be  derailed  owing  to  poor  communication  from  the   management  on  the  intent  regarding  the  changes  to  follow.       Eventually,  people  like  working  in  a  stable  environment  where  changes,  if  any,   are  introduced  in  small  doses  and  keeping  all  affected  parties  informed  on  the   timelines  and  long  term  organization  goal  around  the  same.  The  moment  people   perceive  a  threat  to  their  jobs,  the  resultant  push  back  through  the  grape  vine   and  corridor  conversations  will  swiftly  obscure  the  real  motive  of  the  change.   Richard  J.  Rowan  Jr.,  Director,  Global  Shared  Services   TRW  Automotive     While  there  is  a  broad  and  growing  shared  services  and  business  services   presence  in  the  board  rooms  and  operations  of  companies  worldwide,  there   remains  -­‐  even  among  practitioners  -­‐  variation  in  the  definition,  scope  and   structure  of  shared  services.    In  light  of  that,  to  expect  a  targeted  area  of  a   business  to  understand  what  shared  services  or  business  services  is  with  little  to   no  introduction  and  no  listing  of  expected  benefits  to  both  the  target   area/function  and  the  broader  company  is  a  recipe  for:    at  best,  a  difficult   implementation  and  at  worst,  a  failed  shared  services  implementation.   Commitment/support  from  the  top  is  critical  but  paying  attention  to  all  levels  is   vital.  
  5. 5. 3   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   Failings  in  Change  Management  boil  down,  time  and  again,  to  overlooking  a   few  key  stepping  stones.  What  are  the  most  common  mistakes?   Emer  O’Kelly,  Regional  Director  Europe   Chazey  Partners   “Too  little,  too  late  and  not  often  enough”  could  sum  up  the  challenges  to  avoid   in  achieving  effective  change  management  through  communication.   It  is  too  often  perceived  as  something  to  do  later,  or  to  be  done  by  someone   else.  To  be  effective,  there  needs  to  be  consistent,  regular,  clear  flow  of   communication  with  working  structure  to  allow  for  this  communication  to  be   genuinely  two-­‐way,  and  this  needs  to  commence  at  the  earliest  reasonable  time.   For  a  transformation,  this  is  likely  to  be  after  a  business  case  has  been   established  and  the  commitment  is  made  to  performing  a  transformation.  (There   is,  of  course,  communication  required  during  a  business  case  phase  but  this  does   tend  to  be  a  more  limited  audience).     The  communication  network  also  needs  to  cover  all  levels  which  need  to  be   aware  of  the  proposed  changes  and  their  impacts,  some  of  which  are  obvious   (e.g.  “what’s  in  it  for  me?”)  to  others  which  are  less  so  (e.g.  the  company’s  ability   to  attract  suitable  talent  through  its  reputation  in  the  market-­‐place).  This  calls   for  the  use  of  many  different  channels  of  communication  –  e.g.  town-­‐hall   meetings,  smaller  groups,  1-­‐to-­‐1’s,  breakfast  briefings,  walk-­‐abouts,  confirmed   be  email  as  appropriate  and  backed  up  by  project  web-­‐site    /  blog  /  FAQ’s.   Whatever  channel  or  timing  is  followed,  the  message  needs  to  be  consistent  and   regularly  reinforced,  and  presented  in  a  positive  light.   Ann-­‐Marie  Massenberg,  Chief  of  Staff,  Program  Support  Center   U.S.  Department  of  Health  &  Human  Services     I  think  that  change  management  is  frequently  confused  with  a  communication   plan.  Some  leaders  focus  on  providing  training,  and  executing  a  communication   plan.  Many  fail  to  see  that  the  most  important  element  of  change  management   is  that  those  affected  must  be  involved  in  the  change  rather  than  having  change   imposed  upon  them.  They  need  to  buy  in  to,  or  at  the  very  least  understand,  the   vision  and  the  end  state.  And  they  must  be  involved  in  all  aspects  of  the  change   in  order  to  enable  and  facilitate  the  change.    All  parties  involved  need  to   understand  the  reason(s)  for  the  change  and  have  a  chance  to  be  involved  in  the   decisions  of  how  the  change  will  be  managed,  planned,  and  implemented.  
  6. 6. 4     Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management           Kayzad  Hiramanek,  COO   Avantha  ERGO  Life  Insurance       There  are  several  mistakes  leadership  can  make  in  this  area.  There  is  no  magic   formula  to  predict  whether  the  prescribed  change  will  actually  result  in   betterment  of  the  organization.  World  over,  we  have  seen  innumerable  take-­‐ overs,  mergers  and  transitions  fail  owing  to  the  lack  of  anticipation  of  forces  that   are  playing  in  the  background.         Some  of  the  common  reasons  for  such  failures  begin  at  the  thought  level:  is  this   change  really  required?  Is  the  organization  in  the  long  term  going  to  be  solely   focussed  on  its  core  competencies?  Is  the  leadership  team  sufficiently  convinced   that  this  decision  is  for  the  betterment  of  the  organization?  Can  our  customers   stand  by  us  through  this  journey  of  transition?  Do  the  laws  of  the  land  permit  me   to  make  such  a  transition?         Many  a  time,  if  the  key  leadership  is  not  convinced  of  the  decision,  they  play  a   vital  role  in  derailing  the  overall  change  and  its  implementation  schedule.  Even  if   key  leadership  is  convinced,  sometimes  a  synchronized  communication  strategy   is  essential  to  ensure  that  all  parts  of  the  organization  are  talking  the  same   language  to  the  affected  parties.  Not  speaking  in  one  voice  is  also  detrimental  to   the  overall  change  agenda.         In  addition,  not  identifying  key  resources  that  manage  large  customer   relationships  and  ensuring  their  retention  is  vital  to  ensure  that  the  internal   challenges  do  not  manifest  themselves  to  the  external  eco  system.         Richard  J.  Rowan,  Jr.,     Director,  Global  Shared  Services   TRW  Automotive       Change  management  is  often  perceived  as  a  nice  to  have  instead  of  the  critical   to  success  item.    As  such,  many  shared  services  implementations  spend  too  little   time  -­‐  at  all  levels,  especially  the  grass  roots  level  -­‐  working  to  understand  the   vantage  point  of  those  closest  to  the  targeted  work.    The  late  Stephen  R.  Covey   in  his  book  The  7  Habits  for  Highly  Effective  People  wrote  about  seeking  first  to   understand,  then  to  be  understood.    Taking  the  time  to  do  this  helps  build  the   relationship  and  ensure  that  you  understand  the  concerns  held  by  those   impacted  by  shared  services.    As  Covey  would  say,  being  efficient  with  people  is   not  effective.    Spend  the  time.          
  7. 7. 5     Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management             Customer  resistance  is  one  of  the  biggest  obstacles  to  change.  How  can  you   work  around  this  constructively?   Emer  O’Kelly,  Regional  Director  Europe   Chazey  Partners     Maintaining  the  level  of  customer  service,  performance  and  accessibility  is  a   prerequisite  to  protect  the  business’  activity  as  it  goes  through  a  major  change   process.  This  extends  to  presenting  why  the  change  is  required  i.e.  to  further   strengthen  the  business  and  its  ability  to  continue  to  deliver  good  quality   products  and  services.     Customers  must  be  reassured  there  is  no  significant  risk  to  their  supply  and  that   the  elements  which  cause  them  to  trade  with  the  company  in  the  first  place  are   recognised  and  valued  by  the  business,  and  will  be  maintained  or  enhance  by  the   transformation.  Thus,  there  needs  to  be  a  flow  of  communication  to  customers   which  makes  them  aware  there  is  a  change,  why  and  what  impacts  are   envisaged.  This  may  extend  to  specific  briefings  with  key  customers,  depending   on  the  nature  of  the  business.     This  need  to  disseminate  information  also  extends  to  other  stakeholders  such  as   suppliers  and  others  who  may  potentially  be  affected,  including  banks  and   regulatory  bodies.  This  whole  process  can  be  categorised  as  listening  to  the   “voice  of  the  customer”,  finding  out  what’s  important  to  them  and  ensure  they   are  given  the  appropriate  degree  of  attention.         Ann-­‐Marie  Massenberg,  Chief  of  Staff,  Program  Support  Center   U.S.  Department  of  Health  &  Human  Services       Managing  a  customer’s  resistance  to  change  requires  understanding  the  reason   for  the  resistance.  In  some  cases,  it’s  fear  of  the  unknown.  In  others,  it’s  a  lack  of   confidence  that  a  provider  can  provide  the  level  of  service  that  the  organization   is  used  to.  We  engage  our  customers  right  away  and  involve  them  in  the   planning  and  implementation  at  all  stages  of  the  process.  We  establish  quick   wins  to  show  progress  and  gain  customer’s  confidence  in  our  abilities.  This  sets   the  tone  for  what  they  can  expect  as  we  progress  with  the  transition.  We  ensure   that  the  vision  and  end  state  is  clearly  and  thoroughly  communicated  to  all   affected  people  and  provide  multiple  opportunities  for  clarification  and   explanation  along  the  way.  
  8. 8. 6   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   Kayzad  Hiramanek,  COO   Avantha  ERGO  Life  Insurance   While  the  real  challenge  in  the  management  of  change  is  internal,  it  eventually   manifests  itself  to  the  external  customer  if  key  stakeholders  decide  to  leave  the   organization  and  the  relationship  with  external  customers  thus  weakens.   Therefore,  identification  of  key  accounts  and  their  respective  relationship   managers  is  a  vital  activity  to  be  undertaken.  In  addition,  senior  leadership   should  take  charge  of  the  overall  organization  portfolio  and  build  one-­‐to-­‐one   relationships  with  the  decision  makers  in  these  key  accounts  to  mitigate  the   attrition  risk.       In  addition,  subtly  sounding  off  customers  of  the  impending  changes  within  the   organization  also  goes  a  long  way  in  building  a  relationship  of  trust  and  giving   the  customer  the  comfort  that  the  provider  is  taking  this  decision  for  the   betterment  of  all  parties  involved.  Nothing  could  be  worse  than  customers   finding  out  about  big  bang  changes  in  the  media  and  then  seeking  clarity  on   whether  the  existing  relationship  will  still  enjoy  the  same  level  of  priority  it  did.     Richard  J.  Rowan,  Jr.,    Director,  Global  Shared  Services   TRW  Automotive     Some  effort  should  be  extended  to  map  the  current  process.  Carefully  listen  to   issues  raised  as  well  as  spend  some  time  explaining  how  things  will  change.     Highlight  the  benefits  and  any  offsetting  detriments  from  the  new  process.     Stephen  R.  Covey’s  seek  first  to  understand,  then  to  be  understood  habit  is   extremely  beneficial.  This  is  truly  an  art.    If  too  much  time  or  attention  is  allotted   to  discussing  the  angst  of  change,  the  project  risks  being  thrown  off  schedule.     Alternatively,  if  not  enough  time  is  spent,  progress  on  the  project  will  likely  be   more  slow  and  painful.  
  9. 9. 7   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   What  are  3  core  factors  to  consider  that  ensure  Change  Management  supports   your  objectives?   Emer  O’Kelly,  Regional  Director  Europe   Chazey  Partners   Identify  why  the  change  is  required  and  why  it  is  worth  doing,  then  create  a   coalition  of  people  to  guide  the  initiative,  and  promote  and  drive  the  change   message  consistently.  Positive  changes  must  be  led  and  sponsored  –  they  do  not   happen  themselves;  they  require  energy,  enthusiasm  and  passion.   (1)   Clear  vision  /  consistent  message     Identify  why  the  change  is  required  and  why  it  is  worth  doing,  then  create  a   coalition  of  people  to  guide  the  initiative,  and  promote  and  drive  the  change   message  consistently.  Positive  changes  must  be  led  and  sponsored  –  they  do  not   happen  themselves;  they  require  energy,  enthusiasm  and  passion.   (2)   Communication   Create  a  communication  plan  which  addresses  the  major  issues,  concerns  and   audiences,  which  also  allows  for  feed-­‐back,  queries  and  challenges.     Then  double  it.  J   (3)   Managing  Stakeholder  relationships   Ensure  that  all  significant  stakeholders,  internal  and  external,  are  addressed   regularly  in  such  a  way  as  to  minimize  the  number  of  surprises  experienced  by   anyone  with  an  interest  in  the  progress  of  the  initiative.     For  example,  there  should  be  no  cases  of  “I  didn’t  realize  that’s  what  it  meant”   or  “that  timescale  is  unrealistic”,  encountered  at  crucial  points,  often  later  in  the   project.  It  is  important  to  maintain  consistency  within  the  new  processes  as  far   as  possible  and  to  avoid  unnecessary  workarounds  arising  from  such  potential   misunderstandings.   Kayzad  Hiramanek,  COO   Avantha  ERGO  Life  Insurance   While  there  are  so  many  factors  that  influence  the  course  of  successful  change,   in  my  opinion  the  top  three  success  factors  would  be:     a) Clarity  in  leadership  thought  process  on  why  the  change  is  essential  and beneficial  for  the  future  course  of  the  company.  In  conjunction,  buy  in  of  all   senior  leadership  to  this  course  of  action  is  a  must.     b) Two  way  communication  with  the  employee  base  on  why  the  change/ transition  will  not  affect  people’s  jobs  at  least  for  the  initial  period.   Eventually,  every  transition  is  accompanied  by  some  amount  of  attrition.   The  key  is  to  keep  it  within  a  reasonable  limit  (globally  recorded  standards  
  10. 10. 8   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   are  around  10-­‐15%).  Ability  to  accept  employee  feedback/  suggestions  and   a  visible  implementation  of  the  same  will  go  a  long  way  in  ensuring  that   people  to  not  sand  bag  the  initiative.       c) Management  of  the  eco  system  is  the  third  critical  element  in  this  piece.  No organization  wants  a  trial  by  the  media  or  its  retail  shareholders  regarding   its  motives.    In  addition,  foresight  in  managing  regulators  and  vendors  is  key   to  ensure  that  all  change  follows  legal  standards  with  regards  to  pending   payments  and  tax  laws.  Finally,  management  of  key  customer  relationships   should  be  thought  through  well  in  advance  to  ensure  survival  of  the   business  through-­‐out  the  critical  path  of  the  project   Ann-­‐Marie  Massenberg,  Chief  of  Staff,  Program  Support  Center   U.S.  Department  of  Health  &  Human  Services     1) Clear  Vision  –  there  must  be  a  clear  end  state  that  must  be  explained 2) Involvement  –  of  all  the  people  affected  by  the  changes  in  the    planning and  execution  of  the  changes 3) Communication  –  consistent,  accurate,  and  thorough  communications  to all  affected  people Richard  J.  Rowan,  Jr.,  Director,  Global  Shared  Services   TRW  Automotive     (1)   Change  leader,  change  thyself  -­‐  I  recently  read  a  McKinsey  &  Company   article  entitled,  Change  Leader,  change  thyself.    I  think  it  is  very   important  that  as  we  ask  people  to  look  at  a  process  and  change,  we  at   the  same  time  look  at  our  proposed  processes  and  remain  open  to   finding  an  even  better  way  to  forward  –  change  leader,  change  thyself.     Being  candid  about  this  item  with  your  customers/impacted  parties  will   build  credibility.   (2)   Follow  The  7  Habits  of  Highly  Effective  People,  especially  habit  four   through  six:   • Seek  first  to  understand,  then  to  be  understood. • Think  win-­‐win. • Synergize (3)   Communicate,  communicate,  communicate  –  remembering  all  aspects  of the  communication  process:  sender,  receiver,  feedback  and  “noise”. And,  don’t  forget  that  listening  is  a  part  of  communication.
  11. 11. 9   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   CONCLUSION   Change  Management  is  crucial  to  leading  a  project  to  success  –  whether  this  is  a  Shared  Services   implementation,  a  subsequent  process  improvement  or  transformation  initiative,  or  an   expansion  of  scope  of  service.  Every  shift  from  “business  as  usual”  should  be  preceded  by  a   change  management  plan.   If  you  would  like  to  discuss  your  existing  change  management  framework,  or  take  a  first  step   towards  embedding  solid  change  management  processes  in  your  operations,  our  practitioners   would  be  pleased  to  guide  you  through  this.     Email  us  at  enquiries@chazeypartners.com  or  visit  our  website  at  www.chazeypartners.com   More  Change  Management  Articles:   TOOLKIT:  3  Key  Factors  to  Effective  Change  Management  in  Shared  Services Change  is  a  constant  –  in  fact,  it's  often  a  simple  matter  of  survival.  But  the  best-­‐laid   transition  plans  can  and  will  fail  if  you  overlook  the  "how"  and  the  "when".  Our  six-­‐step   methodology  will  keep  you  on  track,  as  long  as  you  remember  three  key  factors.   BLOG:  What  Business  Services  Leaders  Can  Learn  About  "Change"  from  Parenting  Guides   Business  Services  is  a  bit  like  parenting  –  just  when  you  think  you  might  have  cracked  it,  a   spanner  is  thrown  in  the  works.  David  tells  it  as  it  is.   VIDEO:  7  Minutes  with  Chazey's  Change  Management  Expert   Robert  Towle,  Managing  Director  of  Chazey  Partners  North  America  (East)  tells  us  why   the  most  common  mistake  he  encounters  is  the  assumption  that  one  piece  of   communication  will  get  "buy-­‐in";  and  reminds  us  that  "change  management"  is  not  the   same  as  "eliminating  change".
  12. 12. 10   Chazey  Partners  Practitioners’  Corner  │  Change  Management   For  more  articles  about  Shared  Services  &  Business  Transformation   Please  visit  our  website  at  www.ChazeyPartners.com/Resources  or  subscribe  to  our  monthly  e-­‐ newsletters  for  the  latest  updates   Meet  Our  Practitioners   Phil  Searle  CEO  &  Founder   Chazey  Partners   +1  408  402  3008   philsearle@chazeypartners.com   Esteban  Carril  Managing  Director,  Latin  America   Chazey  Partners   +54  (911)  3085  5140   estebancarril@chazeypartners.com   Chas  Moore  Managing  Director,  North  America  (East)   Chazey  Partners   +1  855  692  6229  Ext  201   chasmoore@chazeypartners.com     Robert  Towle  Managing  Director  North  America  (West)   Chazey  Partners   +1  862  812  7851   roberttowle@chazeypartners.com   David  O’Sullivan  Co-­‐Founder  &  Partner   Chazey  Partners   +353  (0)  86  384  8573   davidosullivan@chazeypartners.com   Emer  O’Kelly  Regional  Director  Europe   Chazey  Partners   +44  (0)  7703  647  360   emerokelly@chazeypartners.com   Christina  Exarchou  Head  of  HR  Practice  EMEA   Chazey  Partners   +30  6944  525622   christinaexarchou@chazeypartners.com   Anirvan  Sen  Managing  Director,  Asia,  Middle  East  and  Africa   Chazey  Partners   +31  649133170  /  +65  85143766   anirvansen@chazeypartners.com   Janey  Jux  Head  of  Public  Sector  Practice  EMEA   Chazey  Partners   +  44  (0)  800  6440649   janeyjux@chazeypartners.com  
  13. 13. North America | Latin America | Europe | Middle East | Africa | Asia Email: enquiries@chazeypartners.com | Web: www.chazeypartners.com About Chazey Partners Chazey Partners is a practitioners-led global management advisory business. We bring together a unique wealth of experience empowering our clients to strive for world class excellence through Business Transformation, Shared Services & Outsourcing, Technology Enablement, Process Enhancement and Corporate Strategy Optimization. We pride ourselves in having built, operated and turned around some of the world's most highly commended and ground breaking Shared Services Organizations, and for implementing many highly successful multi-sourced (shared services and outsourced) delivery solutions. Over the last 20 years, we have delivered numerous programs globally, in the US, Canada, UK, Continental Europe, Ireland, India, Eastern Europe, South America, Singapore, Australia, China, Middle-East and Africa. Our experience covers both Private and Public Sectors, providing expertise in a wide spectrum of business functions, including Finance, HR, IT and Procurement. Learn more about, please visit our website www.chazeypartners.com Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook

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