Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
The united states constitution
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The united states constitution

660

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
660
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The United States Constitution By: Sarah Shepherd
  • 2. When was the Constitution Written? • The Constitution was written between May 25th and September 17th, 1787. • The Framers met 89 out of 116 days during that time. • On May 25th, George Washington was unanimously elected as the first president • On May 28th, the second session, rules were established for procedure of creating the constitution. • On September 17th, the Constitution was signed by 39 men
  • 3. Who Created the Constitution? • 74 delegates who were chosen from 12 out of 13 of the states (only 55 showed up though) • Many had fought in the Revolution • 39 were previous members of the Continental Congress, Congress of the Confederation, or both. • 8 served in constitutional conventions in their own States. • 7 had been State governors • 8 had signed the Declaration of Independence • 31 had gone to college (at the time there were very few colleges) • 2 were future presidents and 1 was a future vice president • 17 served for the Senate and 11 served for the House of Representatives • Average age of the men was 42; Benjamin Franklin was the oldest at 81 years old
  • 4. Why was the Constitution written? • The articles created a weak government • Government couldn’t handle the problems of the nation • Those most threatened by it took the initiative to fix the problem (such as large property owners, merchants, traders, etc.)
  • 5. What events led to its creation? • After the Revolutionary War, problems started to occur in effect of the weakness of the Articles of Confederation • The states stopped supporting the central government • Some made agreements with foreign governments without approval of the National Government • The states would put taxes on each others goods or would ban some trade of some goods • Economic instability caused violence to break out, one incident was so bad that the Springfield, Massachusetts Supreme Court was closed
  • 6. Where was it written? Philadelphia is where the meetings between May 25th, 1787 and September 17th, 1787.
  • 7. What was the Constitution modeled after? • William Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England • Baron de Montesquieu’s The Spirit of the Laws • Jean Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract • John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government
  • 8. What problems did the Constitution solve? It solved the issues of the Articles of Confederation that “established ‘a firm league of friendship’”. The government didn’t have enough power, and the Constitution gave the government more but balanced power over America.
  • 9. What are its limitations? The government is not all-powerful. It only has as much power as the citizens give to it. The government is never above the law. The government must obey the law.
  • 10. How would I improve the Constitution? I honestly wouldn’t change anything about the Constitution. I think that the Constitution equals out all of the power of government very well and it shouldn’t be changed in any way.
  • 11. Is it still relevant? The Constitution is still very relevant. Though we’ve progressed as a nation, the very laws that started us as a strong nation should always be kept, in my opinion.
  • 12. Credits http://www.regent.edu/general/library/about_the_library/news_publications/2007_08.cfm - Title Page background picture Magruder’s American Government All the information on this power point.

×