Open Educational Resources - what are they; finding and evaluating them; creating and licensing them
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Open Educational Resources - what are they; finding and evaluating them; creating and licensing them

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by Sarah Morehouse, Librarian at Empire State College

by Sarah Morehouse, Librarian at Empire State College
and Kathleen Stone, Coordinator of Curriculum Development and Instructional Design at Empire State College

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Open Educational Resources - what are they; finding and evaluating them; creating and licensing them Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What are they? Finding and evaluating them Creating and licensing them By Kathleen Stone and Sarah Morehouse
  • 2.  Online delivery method  But can have a physical version  Any format or medium  Any genre  Any size/length or level of granularity
  • 3.  Open Textbooks are one kind of OER  Free  Online  Often customizable by the professor  Many have the same kinds of editorial support and peer review as traditional textbooks
  • 4.  15 peer reviewed FREE ONLINE textbooks in critical subject areas  Will be published this fall through SUNY Press  The IITG grant got renewed, so keep your ears open for the next call for proposals.
  • 5. FREE  No cost to access  Can link to it OPEN  No cost to access  Can link to it  Can copy and share copies  Sometimes can create derivative works  No need to ask permission  No royalties
  • 6.  Copyright allows major content providers (publishers, vendors) to:  Make content too expensive  Put up barriers to good educational practice  Creative Commons is a workaround within the copyright system  Copyright owners can opt in to Creative Commons
  • 7.  Opt-in system of license that allows the copyright owner to specify what permissions are automatically granted:  Make copies and share copies  Make derivative works  And to whom:  Everyone or non-commercial only?  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/
  • 8.  Creative Commons: http://search.creativecommons.org  Google Advanced Search: http://www.google.com/advanced_search
  • 9.  OER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/  MERLOT: http://www.merlot.org/merlot/index.htm
  • 10.  Connexions: http://cnx.org  The Orange Grove: http://florida.theorangegrove.org/og/access /home.do  Vimeo: https://vimeo.com  YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/
  • 11.  OER Assessment Rubric – http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm? code=L9WC6X&sp=yes
  • 12.  Enlightened self-interest - participate in something that benefits you  Gain a wider audience  Improve higher education and help control the costs  Make it easier for your colleagues to reuse and repurpose your work
  • 13.  Make sure others can translate it and adapt it for local needs  Non-proprietary format (a.k.a. open format)  Allow derivative works  Make it accessible for people with disabilities  Make it accessible for people with old/slow technology
  • 14.  What if somebody uses it in an inappropriate context or changes it in a bad way?  It doesn’t reflect on you any more than it would if they had cited you.  They have to link back to your original, so people will see what you actually intended.  You can add instructions or recommendations for use.
  • 15.  OER Authoring Tools - http://subjectguides.esc.edu/oerauthoringto ols  Some you install, some you use online  Some free and open source, others just free
  • 16.  You need to own the copyright  Your co-authors agree to it  It’s not a work for hire  You didn’t sign the copyright over to a publisher/journal  You’ve cleared the copyrights for any other works that are part of it
  • 17.  Creative Commons License Chooser http://creativecommons.org/choose/
  • 18.  Put it out there:  MERLOT and YouTube/Scribd/Slideshare are good places to start.  Share it with your colleagues  Give it a title and keywords (metadata, tags) that will help people find it