2012 SAS | Meredith Speier | A Failure to Plan, is a Plan for Failure.

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  • My goal today is to share with you the different types of planning, at a high level, and then talk about the importance of planning for the most desired outcome.
  • Planning originated at JWT (depending who you ask, of course) in the 1960’s in London. It was the birth of a new way of servicing clients and incorporating the consumer into the advertising process, but I’ll talk more about that in a bit.
  • Strategic planning covers a lot of disciplines. At the root of all of it, however, is strategy: the idea of knowing what to do. Of formulating a plan. Planning helps take the risk out of marketing. Marketing can happen without planning…
  • But it might not end well.
  • Strategic planning covers a lot of disciplines. At the root of all of it, however, is strategy: the idea of knowing what to do. Of formulating a plan. Planning helps take the risk out of marketing. Marketing can happen without planning…
  • Let’s talk a little about each type of planning. Starting with strategic planning overall.Starting point – ending point – and a map to get there.Think Google maps. If you don’t have a starting point it will fail to yield a result. Same for an end point.Google maps will often give you multiple routes. You have to choose the best.Clients will also need a multi-year plan. Things like changing brand perception, increasing sales, growing customer base, all take time and sometimes they need to bite off quick hits before they can get to their final destination, that’s what a good strategic plan will deliver.Typically you’re going to see MBA’s as strategic planners because of the level of expertise, financial sense and overall business understanding required.
  • Here’s the way the process works at JWT…and lots of other consultants use a similar process.
  • Brand planning is about storytelling. Brands need ideas and ultimately stories, because people spend more time with brands that have a story behind them.
  • You’ll notice that these ideas are not what you see or hear in advertising. These are the essence of the brand, behind the scenes. These are what help shape the brand story that makes it a brand people want to spend time with. But they are NOT the ad or the creative idea for the brand…those come from the creative team and the account planners
  • Account planners are the inspiration behind the ads. And they are qualified to be this inspiration because they serve as the representative of the consumer in the advertising process. Account planners are responsible for understanding the audience and providing the research needed to understand them to the fullest. Account planning is relatively new to the advertising world. It was created in the 1970’s in London by 2 agencies at the same time…which, if you read much about the generation of new ideas, you’ll find that the best ideas often simultaneously occur…
  • JWT and SMP in London both experienced a similar observation. Client information went to the account director, who then distilled it to the creative team and the media team. What they noticed was that the creative team was often hungry for more information about the customers and who they were designing ads for. Meanwhile the media team was often dredging up all sorts of information on consumers from their media research tools that ultimately went nowhere. CLICKWhat they came up with was a new disciple and ultimately a new process. Whereby the injected another person, a person who was dedicated to understanding the consumer. A sort of bridge between the product and the creative, that represented the customer…not only did it solve a problem, it also got everyone talking and working together more than ever before.
  • Where strategic planners put out roadmaps, and brand planners come up with brand ideas and hierarchy; account planners are the owners of the creative brief. As the representative of the customer, it is their job to understand what the customer wants and distill it down into a brief document that the creative teams can use to generate ideas and ultimately advertising.
  • Media planners often get a bum rap as the guys who are in charge of “spots and dots.” It’s an old reference to the days when all media planners did was plan TV spots and print ads. But today that has changed. Media planners are some of the most strategic thinkers in the planning bunch. They’ve got a lot of venues to consider and are often challenged to think far outside the box to help reach today’s time-challenged consumers.Show inMobi presentation from YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=L3li207NZbA
  • Here are some of my recent favorite outside the box media placements that really incorporate the medium into the ad itself.
  • Some folks are starting to refer to this extension outside the box as a new discipline in itself, Connection Planning. Especially when it relates to the web and social media…but that’s for another day.
  • Digital Strategy is the last of the Planning disciplines I’ll have time to cover today. Digital strategists are a close sibling to Strategic Planners, but with an emphasis on the digital channel. Thanks to the growth in digital usage across the globe, digital is becoming more important to businesses. As you can see here, just about everyone and their grandparents go online and use mobile phones.
  • Let’s talk a little about each type of planning. Starting with strategic planning overall.
  • Though many of the planning skill sets cross over, there are some distinct differences.
  • Though many of the planning skill sets cross over, there are some distinct differences.
  • Though many of the planning skill sets cross over, there are some distinct differences.
  • Though many of the planning skill sets cross over, there are some distinct differences.
  • Though many of the planning skill sets cross over, there are some distinct differences.
  • 2012 SAS | Meredith Speier | A Failure to Plan, is a Plan for Failure.

    1. 1. March 2, 2012ON PLANNINGBY MEREDITH SPEIER, SENIOR DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC PLANNING
    2. 2. Overview Who am I Types of planning What kind of planner are you?2
    3. 3. A little bit about me year Year year year 1–3 3–7 7 – 12 12 – 173
    4. 4. A little bit about JWT 200 offices 90 countries 10,000 marketing professionals One of 300 WPP companies The Minneapolis office of JWT is the digital center of excellence4
    5. 5. JWT and Planning Ugo Ceria Said Seihoub Madrid Jack Perone Vienna Brooke Curtis Ekaterina Filimonova Toronto London Moscow Meredith Speier Minneapolis Pragya Singh New Delhi Adrian Barrow New York Jordan Price Tokyo Vannya Martinez Mexico City Hajime kato Tokyo Antonio Abello Haidong Guan Bogotá Shanghai Mollie Hill Singapore Gonzalo Fonseca Buenos Aires Russell Martin Thomas McGillick Kareem Farid Cape Town Sydney Cairo Ana Hernandes Khurram Hussain São Paulo Lahore Over 250 planners across the globe
    6. 6. TYPES OF PLANNING6
    7. 7. The roots of planning Connection Planning Media Planning Communication Planning Digital Strategy Content Strategy Brand Planning Account Planning CRM Planning Strategy7
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. Types of planning we’ll cover today Digital Strategy Media Planning Account Planning Brand Planning Strategy9
    10. 10. Strategic Planning Assess the Map a plan situation for success Identify and solve the problem10
    11. 11. Strategic Planning Competitive/ Stakeholder Audience Success Strategic Plan Industry Alignment Insights Metrics & Roadmap Assessment11
    12. 12. Brand Planning PLANNER12
    13. 13. Brand Planning “Somewhere in your product, or in your business, there is a ‘difference’, an idea that can be developed into a story so big, so vital, and so compelling to your public as to isolate your product from its competitors,and make your public think of it as distinctly a different kind of product.” J. Walter Thompson, 1917
    14. 14. Examples of brand ideas Real beauty Creative Fun family Authentic independence entertainment athletic performance
    15. 15. Account Planning15
    16. 16. Account Planning Creative Client Account Before Account Planning Director Media Account Creative Director After Account Planning Client Account Planner Media16
    17. 17. Account Planning Coca Cola’s Creative Brief Excerpted from: Coca Cola Content 2020 Part One, The CognitiveMedia17
    18. 18. Media Planning18
    19. 19. Media Planning Source: Griffin Farley, Strategic Planning in Advertising, Tampa Ad2 Club19
    20. 20. Media Planning Source: Griffin Farley, Strategic Planning in Advertising, Tampa Ad2 Club20
    21. 21. Media Planning21 Source: Griffin Farley, Strategic Planning in Advertising, Tampa Ad2 Club
    22. 22. Digital StrategyOldest Age 86 65 46 29Youngest Age 66 47 30 10Total Population 35,254,874 77,980,296 63,425,317 87,608,116Percent of Pop 11% 25% 21% 29%Average time online/month 33.7 38.0 36.4 29.2Mobile owners 69% 87% 94% 65%Smartphone owners 18% 35% 62% 58% 22 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, September 2011 and eMarketer, November 2011
    23. 23. Digital Strategy Competitive/ Stakeholder Audience Success Strategic Plan Industry Alignment Insights Metrics & Roadmap Assessment Online usage, Mobile & web Web analytics, Digital roadmap & savvy, etc. assessment digital metrics release plan23
    24. 24. Which one is right for you? Media Planning Digital Strategy Account Planning Brand Planning Strategy24
    25. 25. Which one is right for you? My planning quiz: 1. Are you a business major and/or do you have a solid understanding of business process? 2. Do your future plans include an MBA? 3. Do you like to solve complex problems? If you answered YES to 2 out of 3 of these, you’re a great candidate for Strategic Planning If you also have a passion for all things digital (the web, mobile, social media, etc.), you could be a great candidate for Digital Strategy25
    26. 26. Which one is right for you? My planning quiz: 1. Do you love brands and everything about them? 2. Do you love to watch advertising and dissect commercials? 3. Do you have a good understanding of all of the facets of marketing? If you answered YES to 2 out of 3 of these, you’re a great candidate for Brand Planning26
    27. 27. Which one is right for you? My planning quiz: 1. Do you love research; both conducting it and analyzing it? 2. Do you often find yourself trying to “figure people out”? 3. Do people ever tell you you’re inspirational or a good “idea” person? If you answered YES to 2 out of 3 of these, you’re a great candidate for Account Planning27
    28. 28. Which one is right for you? My planning quiz: 1. Do you love crunching or analyzing data? 2. Most of the time, do you prefer to operate within a defined process, but sometimes do something totally outside the box? 3. Do people ever tell you you’re one of those rare students who are good with numbers and with people? If you answered YES to 2 out of 3 of these, you’re a great candidate for Media Planning28
    29. 29. Planning Recap Planning Outputs Skill set Strategic Planning Business roadmaps, success metrics, Business acumen, MBA, objectives and strategies financial understanding Brand Planning Brand ideas and architecture Creativity, love for brands Account Planning Creative briefs, inspiration, research Researcher, thoughtful, and audience insights creativity Media Planning Media plans, social media plans, Mathematics, research, audience research forward-thinking Digital Strategy Digital roadmaps, research, web Business acumen, analytical, analytics reports, process change forward thinking29
    30. 30. Q&A30

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